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For the 1st part of my project it just seemed like I was adding and replacing parts. This project is approaching 15 years now and after just replacing my 14 year old rear tires and 10 year old MSD distributor, I thought about making a comprehensive long term maintenance list and records.

Some other items on the list;
Checking electrical wires for abrasion and checking connections
Heating, cooling, water pump
Checking frame for cracks, rust and checking fasteners
Checking suspension bearings, maintenance and wear
Transmission and differential fluid levels, filters where applicable, u joist leaks and seals
Brake system, fluid flush, pad, shoe condition, adjustment, seals
Lights, lighting, charging system
Engine, plugs, leads, cap rotor, fuel filter, belts
Being that bodywork is so expensive, checking any areas that might be developing rust, cleaning, painting,prevention

Likely most of the OEM parts would be stretching their life span without any attention after 5-6 years.

Even something as simple as checking the tire pressure and servicing and torquing the lug nuts.

in the past, I've been more guilty of servincg the vehicle when it needs attention, rather than planning. On new vehicles they have a prescribed service interval, such as on my truck (approaching 7 years) Curious if anyone else does this for their mustang?
 

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In the past, I've been more guilty of servicing the vehicle when it needs attention, rather than planning. On new vehicles they have a prescribed service interval, such as on my truck (approaching 7 years).
There are required and recommended maintenance services in your Owners Manual. It's a good idea to augment/adjust those to allow for changes made to the vehicle, if you have a hydraulic clutch as just one example. On a side note, I would guess that lubing things like PS and suspension components is neglected by many who just don't think of things like that as a matter of course.
 

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There are summer/winter services that need to be done. If you need to change OEM parts every 5-6 years, you're better off buying another car every 5-6 years. My daily driver is a 1970 pickup and it's still using it's original transmission and rear end, but then, I don't beat it up either. So, no, I don't do that either. And having been a professional mechanic for a company with a large fleet of vehicles, they only did scheduled maintenance twice a year.
 

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I change out oil/filter, check tranny and diff fluid level and lube the snot out of everything that needs lube every fall before storage. New tires every 7-8 years or so. Flush brake fluid every 3 years or so. Flush cooling system every 2 years or so also. New air filter only when needed - at 1000-1500 miles per year, it's not too often. Spray some white grease into clutch linkage/Z bar and the shifter trunnions area inside the shifter boot, and spray some penetrating oil onto the shift levers at the transmission and gas pedal linkage once or twice a year. Lube carb/choke linkage as needed. Top up the grease to specified level in the steering box once or twice per year. Clean and repack wheel bearings every 3-4 years. Spark plugs every 3-4 years at the rate I drive. Don't worry about points as I do the Pertronix 1 thing. Brake pads replaced every 10 years or so, but I check them every year. Once a year or so spray some Krown rustproofing inside door frames to keep the front corners rust free. Also shoot some rustproofing inside the frame rails (remove the little plugs in the trunk and shoot it up there), down the cowl, etc.
Cabin air filter = lube the window rollers again lol. That's about it.
 

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I only fix stuff when it clunks/squeaks/breaks or falls off entirely. But I do periodically look at everything to gauge its longevity (brakes, spark plugs, etc). These old cars can limp along with less than all its parts 100% functional. Plus the more you drive them the more in tune you are with what isn’t quite working right.

For example, if a timing chain starts to wear out the engine will start running like crap; in a modern engine with a timing belt, if you blow past the change interval you could end up with a buggered up motor. The belt self adjusters will take up the belt slack of a worn belt all the way up until it snaps, a timing chain will get sloppy and provide sloppy cam timing as a result. It won’t run very well as the chain wears but it won’t kill the motor either.

It won’t hurt to have a list of things to check, and any older-ish car maintenance schedule should be a good start, but I wouldn’t replace it unless it’s showing signs of wear. My $0.02 anyway... :)
 

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Your list looks a little like overkill to me ,why did you change the distributor ? Tires I get--going to have to do 3 cars worth here soon.

Fluids and other wear items,just follow the Owners manual.

How many miles have you put on this car ?
 

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I kept a log on it recording fill-ups/MPG, oil changes, mechanical work, etc, back when I bought it in '86, until I parked it in '03. Since getting it back on the road, the log for mechanical stuff is mostly receipts, since someone else has done the work most of the time. But I still log the stuff I've done, and still record MPG when I fill up. It's an app, so it's easy, and I don't have to do the math.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
After 10 years, it looks like the electronics of the distributor got moisture via the hood scoop or rain, so that likely caused the electronics to corrode or fail.
Same thing with the radiator hoses. I replaced the upper after 12 years, and have a new lower hose sitting on the shelf. Last thing I want is to blow a main hose on a road trip. The door weatherstripping is failing after 15 years, so it's normal for rubber parts to have a lifespan.

Doesn't sound like many people do this, or maybe I drive my car more frequently and on longer trips. True enough I rarely see vintage mustangs on the longer highway cruises.
Actually true story; one of the club members took his 67 fastback on a summer 200 mile cruise and blew up his period-correct BFG front tire. They were very lucky not to have been seriously injured. The front fender and chassis on that corner were completely mangled.
 

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I, for one, keep extensive records on all of my vehicles. My thread in the "Build" forum: 66 Bucket Coupe is showing what I did to restore a car I picked up in buckets and boxes.
 

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every spring at inspection time i change the oil (used to do it myself but not worth my time anymore)
12 yrs tires
antifreeze 4 yrs
brake fluid 5

hoses belts as I see fit usually 12-15 yrs

just keep a mileage log on everything else, fuel filter plugs, plus,points wires cap etc
get up around 10K and change those

no biggie have a trunk full of spare parts and hoses that i travel with in case one acts up on the road
 

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I am in the process of creating a parts log given my car has been resto-modded over the years. Over 36 years of working on the car lets just say I may "mis-remember" the current status of modification. :)

I do have a 3+ decade file of receipts and such. In a perfect world they would be scanned and organized by car system and current vs obsolete. I am putting that off until Mideast peace is achieved...
 

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I have records dating back to 1968 for my original owner 68 coupe.
 

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Yeah the receipts from Summit racing, NPD and my credit card bills!
 

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For the 1st part of my project it just seemed like I was adding and replacing parts. This project is approaching 15 years now and after just replacing my 14 year old rear tires.
487 cubic inches and you've just replaced the rear tires after 14 years?

As far as maintenance goes, when I first started autocrossing last year I put the car on the lift after every event and checked everything. It became every other event by the end of this summer. I figure between the commie, aftermarket, and parts engineered by me, I can't be too careful. Even if it's just a cruiser it's nice to get underneath the old Mustang, check things out, and see how beautifully simple it is!
 

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Yeah the receipts from Summit racing, NPD and my credit card bills!
You must be single! Those receipts are burned instantly and I don't have the passwords to Summit, NPD, or Street or Track saved on any computer.;)
 

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You must be single! Those receipts are burned instantly and I don't have the passwords to Summit, NPD, or Street or Track saved on any computer.;)
Nah, I'm just dumb! Actually, you can't hide the UPS truck showing up if your wife is always home before you!
 

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Nah, I'm just dumb! Actually, you can't hide the UPS truck showing up if your wife is always home before you!
Thats why I have it delivered where I work! Honestly, she has a pretty good idea-ish of what's going on and doesn't want to know the details as the bills are paid and pantry is full.
 

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Well, at the moment, I'm in maintenance. However, I do plan on a few upgrades this winter. One, even though I had my Distributor recurved 10-12 years ago, it was for use with a different engine config. All, as mentioned in another thread, I'm planning on swapping our my "CU" OP line with a braided synthetic unit.
Yes, I too, keep every receipt for every change I've made since 1996. All in a binder divided by systems. Also, have many, if not all of the bolts, and hard components I swapped out too. I guess, I'm way to anal. But, it all comes in handy when the situation calls.
 
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