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I am looking at purchasing a 1964.5 mustang and there is no door tag, the data plate. It is being sold in an estate sale and the person conducting the estate sale for the family advised me one of his employees spoke with a state trooper who told him that that year mustang does not have a data tag. I do not believe this to be accurate but can someone confirm for me either way.

Thanks
 

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There should always be a data plate unless
I am looking at purchasing a 1964.5 mustang and there is no door tag, the data plate. It is being sold in an estate sale and the person conducting the estate sale for the family advised me one of his employees spoke with a state trooper who told him that that year mustang does not have a data tag. I do not believe this to be accurate but can someone confirm for me either way.

Thanks

There should be a data plate to indicate all the information you need to verify the originality of the vehicle.
And technically there are no 1964 mustangs they are all titled 1965.
The dso will help indicate when the vehicle was scheduled to be built. You
 

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Always had a warranty tag. The trooper doesn't know what he's talking about. I would advise not telling him that.

The tag, of course, was only there to furnish dealers information they might need when involved in warranty repair work. I has no legal standing whatsoever, and if this one wasn't missing, you'd see it says so right on the tag. The good news is you can have perfect replacements made, by such as A.G. Backeast, and Marti.
 

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I am looking at purchasing a 1964.5 mustang and there is no door tag, the data plate. It is being sold in an estate sale and the person conducting the estate sale for the family advised me one of his employees spoke with a state trooper who told him that that year mustang does not have a data tag. I do not believe this to be accurate but can someone confirm for me either way.

Thanks
The State Trooper is in need of better training... (sorry, couldn't resist the timely jab.. ;) ).

In all seriousness though, even back in 1964, data plates were required by law to be installed by the factories, as well as VIN stampings in numerous predetermined places.

And "1964 1/2" is just a useful nickname for early-production cars. The VIN # for the car, if it had a data plate, would begin with the number 5, for 1965 production. The Mustang was introduced/released early, April 1964, as a new 1965 model.

If the title is good and clean, and there's a proper VIN # on the LH apron, I'd not worry about the data plate so much, as you can order a valid reproduction from Marti. www.martiauto.com .
 

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The State Trooper is in need of better training... (sorry, couldn't resist the timely jab.. ;) ).

In all seriousness though, even back in 1964, data plates were required by law to be installed by the factories, as well as VIN stampings in numerous predetermined places.

And "1964 1/2" is just a useful nickname for early-production cars. The VIN # for the car, if it had a data plate, would begin with the number 5, for 1965 production. The Mustang was introduced/released early, April 1964, as a new 1965 model.

If the title is good and clean, and there's a proper VIN # on the LH apron, I'd not worry about the data plate so much, as you can order a valid reproduction from Marti. www.martiauto.com .

But through the VIN there is no way to know the production date since there is no warranty tag correct.
 

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I think that Jim Smart's Mustang Registry can help you "ballpark" the build date, likewise 64 1/2 owners on this forum can look at the VIN and ballpark it.
 

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In Texas (where sleeton is located) a "state trooper" is an officer of the Texas Department of Public Safety. And the DPS doesn't hire bozos. Every state trooper I have ever had the occasion to meet, both in good and bad circumstances;), has been very professional. It would be my opinion that the fellow who blamed the misinformation on a state trooper was merely pulling that term out of thin air. His employee probably asked some clown at Autozone the question.
And FWIW- a person must be a state trooper for several years before they can even think about becoming a Texas Ranger.
 

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Lots of people may work at the State Troopers' office but not everyone is a Trooper. And sometimes even Troopers could be misinformed or mistaken. The early cars don't have a data plate on the dash, but were built with one on the door, a buck tag at some assembly plants was screwed to the inner fender apron near where the aprons were stamped with the VIN (or Consecutive Unit Number). If the car is missing all these, I'd probably stay away from it because it would likely be a B!+ch to get registered.
 

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A well, you'd be hard pressed to find someone more supportive than me, but I knew a guy who had his 65 Mustang towed to impound because a trooper couldn't see a VIN through the windshield, and refused to look under the hood.

Dash-top VIN plates did not appear until 1968, before that the only legal VIN on the car was stamped into the fender apron at the left-front corner. There were usually two VINs hidden under the fender flanges.

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The buck tag was a Metuchen thing,, which had no legal standing, it was there only for assembly crews at the plant. As for the Warranty Tag on the door, it has no legal standing either, and it says so right on it.

760898
 
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