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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there anyone with a large Ford literature/memorabilia collections? I am looking for actual Ford documents, press releases, flyers, etc about the 1964 Checkered Flag and Green Flag promotions. Info was possibly sent out the beginning of March 64 or so and the last info would probably be around the middle of June 64. The contest ran from march 20 to April 30. Thank you.
 

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I doubt there is much available since the promotion occurred internally between Ford and its franchises. There was no public involvement. There are several photos floating around on the internet showing a ford executive ceremony and the fleet of some of the pace cars parked in a lot at Dearborn.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
At one time I used to restore 68-70 AMC AMXs and Javelins and had the largest single collection of AMC-Rambler memorabilia, documents etc. The factory and zone offices used to send memos to the dealers all the time for sales contests internal vehicle recalls, auction data, ordering guides-you name it. I had a few hundred binders of this info. If there was a contest there were updates, rules and guides, and when over a list of the winners. There were also national and zone newsletters-for sales, for parts, for service, etc. As a teacher with summers off I used to travel New England and NY buying obsolete dealer inventories, and often a lot of this literature was still in the dealership. I can't believe Ford didn't do the same thing, and that somewhere there is a Ford collector who has this info.
 

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Is there anyone with a large Ford literature/memorabilia collections? I am looking for actual Ford documents, press releases, flyers, etc about the 1964 Checkered Flag and Green Flag promotions. Info was possibly sent out the beginning of March 64 or so and the last info would probably be around the middle of June 64. The contest ran from march 20 to April 30. Thank you.
@tbenvie
Hope this helps:
Early in 1964, Ford launched the Checkered Flag and Green Flag dealer contests to promote the Mustang and its selection as the 1964 Indianapolis 500 pace car. Designed to inspire dealers to sell more vehicles, the Checkered Flag winners would be presented with a Mustang pace car hardtop. (Unlike the Wimbledon White pace and festival cars, the hardtop replicas were painted Pace Car White, color code C, with blue "Rally" stripes over the top like the pace car convertibles). Green flag winners received a $500 discount. There were five Mustang pace cars per district for a total of 180 units (all assembled in mid-April) and divided between each contest. Some of the 37 districts had ties, which called for ordering roughly 20 additional Mustangs, which have "01E" (May 1, 1964) scheduled build dates and DSO 84 (Home Office Reserve) codes.
from here:Mustang Pace Car - Winner's Circle - Mustang Monthly Magazine

There’s more info in this one:

some little tidbits here:

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POSTCARD images below from an eBay listing:
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Trophy’s the Promotional Contest Winners received:


more mentions here about the contest:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the response. If I could address some items that I am looking for an answer. But first some background.

After the 1957 race a group of Indianapolis businessmen created the “500 Festival Associates” to capitalize on the popularity of the race. A number of events would come under their jurisdiction: The 500 Festival Parade, the Festival Queen contest, a professional golf tournament, Mayors breakfast, etc. There were any number of members, but there were 33 directors-the number chosen to coincide with the number of drivers in the race. These directors would be awarded a Festival Car usually around the middle to end of March to use to promote the race a practice still in use today. (These cars are designated as Festival Cars to avoid confusion, but are often called “Parade Cars”, “Track Cars”, and even “Princess Cars” ((there are 33 Princesses hoping to be Queen. Each director sponsored a girl, and they would be given a parade using the Festival Cars). The term “Replica” is reserved for the cars sold through the dealer network. There is often not a Replica each year)). Thus, you may often see “There were 33 Festival Cars produced” when researching the Pace Car program. Except they also gave one to the Festival Queen, so sometimes you see 34. And they gave one to the 500 festival Executive Director, so also you will see 35. But the Governor, Mayor, Indianapolis Police Chief, Marion County Sheriff, and track officials also got a car. For 1964 I believe there were 51 Festival Mustangs. These cars from 1958-1963 were sourced through one local dealer, or a local dealer group. In 1960 Charles Stuart Oldsmobile provided 108 vehicles to the track. The Pace Car was a white Oldsmobile Ninety Eight. (White was the traditional US Racing team color). But to think one dealer could absorb and resell 108 identical cars was doubtful. As a result the Ninety Eights all had different color interiors-and some Olds 88s were also used for Festival Cars. For 1961 the track was celebrating its Golden Anniversary, so gold T-Birds were sourced from a few different Indy area dealers-and they each had their dealer name on the rear quarter. I should also note that the Festival cars were not lettered like the Pace Cars, but had “500 Festival” lettering on the sides instead. In 1962 the Studebaker Lark Daytona was chosen as Pace Car. All the Festival Cars were also white Larks but with different color interiors. All the cars were provided by Charles Stuart Studebaker. For 1963 the Chrysler Pacesetter was the Pace car, painted in a special new color, “Pacesetter Blue”. However, less than 15 of the Festival Cars were painted this color -the others were red, white, dark blue, silver, and possibly other colors. The cars were supplied by two local dealers with the same owner.

Here are some links to a few Facebook Groups I created:

1960 Oldsmobile Ninety Eight

1963 Chrysler Pacesetter
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
After the race the winner was awarded the actual Pace Car as part of the prize package. This started about 1938 when a sponsor suggested it to Packard the Pace Car provider. One exception was 1941 when a prototype Chrysler Newport Phaeton paced the race-the winner was given another Chrysler. In 1946 Lincoln hand-built a car destined to be the Pace car and it was returned to Lincoln. The winner was given a similar car. In 1962 Rodger ward was awarded the first Avanti (which despite stories was never going to be the Pace Car). He returned it and asked for a car with AC instead. In 1965 the winner was under contract with Ford so declined the car (Plymouth Fury) and was given a cash prize instead. In recent years the winner received one of the Festival Cars that was on display at the track, or a replica of the actual pace Car (For instance a Camaro Festival Car and a Corvette Pace Car, the winner sometimes received a Corvette). The last time a winner received a real Pace Car was the Turbo Trans Am for 1989. Another note-sometimes the Festival Cars are completely different than the pace car. For 1978 there were only a handful of Corvettes at the track-the other cars were Monte Carlos and Camaros. There are also other cars provided for the race-in 1963 there was a number of Chrysler execs at the track and they all used Imperials for instance (Unknown if they were lettered on the sides).

So let’s talk about 1964. First, the Galaxie was never going to be a pace car-it was always the Mustang. The confusion may have come from the fact the 500 festival Directors were given Galaxie converts in mid March as the Mustang was not even introduced yet-and the press release stated the galaxies would be turned in when the new cars were available. And there is no truth to a statement “with Mustang mania around the world the Mustang was chosen”. The “New Ford Model” was chosen as Pace Car long before the car was introduced, and the name “Mustang” wasn’t even mentioned for almost a week after the announcement. And the car was introduced to the public April 17 at the New York Worlds Fair (Ford had a huge exhibit there) but the Fair was not open to the public until April 22.

On May 1 the Mustangs were exchanged for the Galaxies at a ceremony of the 500 Festival Directors. They were all white V8s but with different color interiors. I’ve read an account from stories in the 80s-90s the cars were sent from Ford, while later accounts state Ford sourced them from all over Indianapolis, trying to get the right number of cars. My opinion is this is crazy talk. Think about this for a minute: Ford lobbied hard to become the Pace Car. GM did not have a vehicle pace the race since 1960, and Chrysler was lobbying hard to get a Plymouth or Dodge the nod after their success in 1963. So part of the deal of becoming the Pace Car is providing the track with the needed amount of cars for the Festival Directors and other track officials and dignitaries (and about 1967 the support trucks and vans). So if this statement is correct, Ford decided to risk all the positive publicity by hoping there were 50 or so white V8 convertibles in the Indy area and they would be able to gather them for the event. What if there wasn’t? Think of the negative publicity. And to add to that there were less than 24,000 Mustangs made to the end of April. With just over 6,000 dealers it meant about 4 cars per dealer. (And the Festival Cars were delivered to Indy in late April, so really less than 24,000 made at that time). And every single report states that every single car immediately sold, and waiting lists were started at every dealership. So a local Indy dealer just happened to have 50 or so spare white V8 converts on the lot for Ford to use? And what was the deal? Did they get the car back? It was now a used car, so what discount was given? I am pretty sure all the cars were sourced through Bob Phillips Westside Ford in Indianapolis
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, IN. And they had different V8s and interior colors for the same reason I already mentioned: so one dealer would not have a glut of cars exactly the same. Bob Phillips Westside Ford also provided 25 dignitary cars for the Ford officials who were at the track, both two and four door model full size Fords. (Unknown if they were lettered or not). Where did this “procured from local dealers” story come from? I would bet this came from the fact the local dealers DID provide 16 Mustangs for race week to be displayed at the track on various locations, at the airport, and for guests to use-as well as the press. These 16 cars were both coupes and converts, various colors and engine combos.
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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
After the race it is stated the cars went to auction in Kentucky. Again, does not make sense. Indianapolis had its own Sales District, so why would they ever send them to Kentucky? Indianapolis had everything Kentucky had. And there were 160 dealers in the Kentucky Sales District, so Indy dealers drove all the way to the auction to compete against these 160 Kentucky dealers, then use whatever savings they got on the cars to have them shipped back to Indy? Doubtful. Add to that the race was on a Saturday, and On Thursday Bob Phillips Westside Ford ran an ad stating they had Mustang Festival Cars for sale. So the race ended Saturday the day the cars were also turned in by the festival Directors and dignitaries. They were inspected and inventoried and cleaned, shipped to Kentucky , sold at auction, then shipped back to Indy in time for a Thursday ad? One more piece is Westside Ford is the ONLY dealer advertising these cars for sale, running an ad the beginning of July “Only one left”. Jerry Alderman Ford may very well have taken some of these cars to sell as 75 plus used cars (the Mustangs and Ford officials cars) in inventory would perhaps be a lot for one dealer. So I stand by my statement Ford made the cars specifically for the Festival Directors and sent them in one batch for distribution. They were all made the same time (But not sequential numbers, as shown by the ones that are known. And previous years cars were also not sequential).

Speaking of Sequential VINs. I read in most accounts the cars had sequential VINs. There are over 11,000 number difference between the first and last known Pace Car Replicas. The three actual Pace cars were sequential, so perhaps that is where the story originated. (And they are not sequential in each sales District either). The Pace Cars were sent to Holman Moody for updates (they also did the 61 T-Bird and 68 Torino) and sent to the track. It is stated only two of the cars were finished-I have doubts about this as well. The modifications were not so great they couldn’t have been completed in a few short days. So if there was a problem with one of the cars, what would it be? It is also stated there was a problem with the actual Pace Car and the back-up was used. Possibly true, but I can find zero evidence to support this. And what would the problem have been? After the race it is reported the cars were returned to Holman Moody. Anyone know why? From there they were sent out-The only one still known went to Sebring, where it first saw duty as an “Official Car” at the 1966 12 Hours of Sebring Race. It was not a Pace Car as the race used a “Lemans Start” where the drivers line up across the track and run to their cars. And for the new trans Am series, the start was a standing start with a flagman. Where was the car from May 64 to Sebring in 66?

A second car was sent to Watkins Glenn, NY. There is photographic evidence showing the car was indeed there. There is also a photo of one of the actual cars on display at the New York Wolds Fair in July, 1964. Perhaps this one? Unknown at this time, also unknown how long it was there.

The third car is a mystery. As stated, the race winner got an actual Pace Car. Despite press stories before the race stating the winner would get the car as part of the winnings and stories after the race stating Foyt got the car on June 1 at the Victory dinner, an letter from Ford to the Houston Sales District advises them to make arrangements for a white convertible with blue interior, stripe auto trans 289 engine to be built for Mr. A. J. Foyt for winning the race. So for whatever reason he did not get the actual pace car, or a festival Car, but had one built specifically for him. It is known he gave it to his maid who eventually sold it and is currently unknown. There are also reports the third Pace Car went to Firestone, Riverside Raceway CA, Road America WI, or kept by Holman Moody. I also cannot find evidence a car was displayed at the Henry Ford Museum. Someone must know.
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
On to the Replicas. Ford had a Checkered Flag contest where dealers would compete from March 20 to April 30 with a set sales quota. The winners would not only receive the car at no cost, they would be invited to Dearborn, MI (and I think with a guest) to attend a banquet and be presented the keys to their cars by Lee Iococca. It was stated all over there would be 200 cars-105 Checker Flag winners, or five for each of the 36 Sales Districts. Except there were 37 Sales Districts. There is a photo of 99 cars in a parking lot (there are more out of camera range) and 108 dealers posing with Lee Iococca (he is the one without a name tag). The press release of the photo states “105 dealers”. The 85 remaining cars would be awarded to the winners of the runner-up “Green Flag” contest. They would have their cars shipped to them with a $500 discount. It is stated that due to ties ten additional cars were built May 1 with “DSO 84-Home Office Reserve”. Except I have 13 definite cars with DSO 84. Where did this come from? I also have a list of 140 confirmed dealers who received a car through one of the two contests. There is an article stating some of the dealers were from small population areas, and list six dealers by name. Where did this info come from? Is there a master list? My theory is the Checkered Flag contest had 200 winners. There were 108 dealers representing 105 dealerships at the ceremony, so the assumption would be every single winner attended the ceremony. Possible, but also doubtful. And speculation, but perhaps the “DSO 84” designation is for the cars given away at Dearborn. A known history of these cars might prove/disprove this DSO code theory. But the cars given away would at least have a Detroit sales District DSO I would think. I doubt the cars would have the Sales District DSO where the dealer originated and then have them delivered to Dearborn. I would also bet in the photos with Lee Iococca he had the exact same keys for everyone-similar to Universities giving just diploma covers and then they go elsewhere on campus to get their actual diploma.

And why do I think there were 200 Checkered Flag winners? Because I have accounted for 390 actual cars. There are press photos with a line of Mustangs stating “32 sealers in the Buffalo Sales District< “24 dealers in Indianapolis, “15 dealers in San Jose”, etc. There are also numerous press releases showing one dealer with the Mustang he won, or ads mentioning they won a car. And it was not equal for each sales district. Los Angeles had 180 dealers, 51 of whom won a car. Denver had 100 dealers, 15 won a car. Phoenix had 80, 15 won a car. New York had 247 dealers, 29 won a car.

I read someone had all 105 pictures of the dealers receiving their cars at Dearborn and was able to make a list of dealers from the nametags. Does anyone have this? It appears all the winners were given a specific “Ad mat” to use in local papers. There has to be a list somewhere in Ford archives. And I would bet the list was published for all the dealers to see.

So, now you know why I am looking for the official information about the contest. Were dealers grouped by size within a District? How was their quota-to-beat decided? I also wonder if any info is still in any of the sales District offices so many years later. There is no doubt there is more than 190 cars made-but somewhere along the line someone “filled in the blanks” with speculation not fact.

Please respond with any information you may have to help clear this up. Thanks in advance for the help.
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Great Vintage Pace Car pics! I am fortunate enough to have the REAL, Actual Holman Moody Race Prepped Pace Car that Paced the Indianapolis 1964 race right here in my home town of Melbourne, Florida. After the car Paced at Indy in 1964, It was given to the Sebring Racetrack and used as their Pace Car (See pics above.) It stayed in Sebring, FL until the 1990's when it was found in a garage still stored at the Sebring racetrack! The present owner bought the car and fully restored the car retaining a lot of Original one-off special parts. The car is incredible. It's amazing that it even still exists... The backup Pace car (There were 2 used on race day, but only this one Paced the actual race, The Backup car was never used) and was destroyed in an accident years after the race. Here is the 1 of 1 Original Pace car. I took these pictures myself... Behold!

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Great Vintage Pace Car pics! I am fortunate enough to have the REAL, Actual Holman Moody Race Prepped Pace Car that Paced the Indianapolis 1964 race right here in my home town of Melbourne, Florida. After the car Paced at Indy in 1964, It was given to the Sebring Racetrack and used as their Pace Car (See pics above.) It stayed in Sebring, FL until the 1990's when it was found in a garage still stored at the Sebring racetrack! The present owner bought the car and fully restored the car retaining a lot of Original one-off special parts. The car is incredible. It's amazing that it even still exists... The backup Pace car (There were 2 used on race day, but only this one Paced the actual race, The Backup car was never used) and was destroyed in an accident years after the race. Here is the 1 of 1 Original Pace car. I took these pictures myself... Behold!

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Great post! What VIN would that Pace Car have, did you get an image of that?
 
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