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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I have a '65 coupe 289 2v v8 and her brakes are OUT. I have just recently aquired this beauty but I have not dealt with brake work thus far. What would be some good starting points for fixing her brakes or should I start all over and go new?
 

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Does the mastercylinder have any fluid? By the brakes being "out" do you mean the pedal goes to the floor? If you could give us a little more information it would be very helpful to giving you the correct answers/opinions.
 

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Unless you have verifyable history, I would replace the master cylinder with eith a new unit or there is a rebuilder back east who is very good utilizing stainless steel sleeves, replace/rebuild the wheel cylinders, replace all springs, wheelbearings, etc. I would not purchase any composite brake drum, whether they are distributed by Bendix, Raybestos or TRW they are all made in China and do not meet DOT specs...IE very, very dangerous. Check with Kanter auto, I think they can get you real steel units or call CarboTech Engineering in Florida (web site also) to get cryo dipped drums (costs about $15 each more). Brake linings...whole other subject..

Your Mustang was designed for semi-metallic linings with a friction co-efficient of .25 (IIRR) or better. The shoes sold at the local parts houses do not meet this spec...ie you can get yourself in real trouble, just because they say "DOT" approved, doesn't mean they are approved for that application. Replacement linings are available in semi metallic from L&N Friction Riverside Ca, ($50 a set) of you can get higher level friction from CarboTech engineering ($120 set). Also, make sure you have fro the fronts the "Brake shoe retracting assist spring", it is not included in the brake rebuilding kits now, but it connects directly the primary & secondary front shoes together. Without it, the front shoes will drag against the drums causing excessive wear out and dragging
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The mastercylinder did not have any fluid when I got her. I have since then put some in there just for troubleshooting. yes when I say out I do mean the peddle goes to the floor. I cannot seem to get any pressure build up at all. If there is one thing I want to get 110% right it would have to be brakes. /forums/images/icons/smile.gif
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
beechkid,
Thanks for all your input the DOT information was especially needed because I had not thought about that until now. Once I can get the Marvel Mystery Oil to do her job her engine should crank....but the brakes seem to be the largest barrier thus far.
Thanks again,
 

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As said before, new master cylinder, brake hoses, wheel cylinders and new brakes and springs. Make sure you trace out your steel lines for any excessive rust and replace as needed. Then buy you a big can of fluid to do a lot flushing to make sure all debris and air is out of lines.

I flushed my llines before even connecting the line to the new wheel cylinder. Just didn't want crap to get inside cylinders. Then bled again with line connected.

Tom
 

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Beechkid,
I'm curious, why would well established name brand manufacturers like Bendix et al sell something that's not DOT approved? I'd would have thought they would open themselves to liability issues not to mention their namesake?

Kinda sounds like a Mercedes being manufactured by Yugo?
 

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It's best to do it all once and be done with brakes. And all the parts are really inexpensive.

New Master cylinder $25
4 new wheel cylinders $40
New brake shoes $35
AND NEW FLEX LINES $50
All new brake springs $18

A lot of people forget that those flex lines are 35 years old. Even if you have to spend some to replace any drums which are out of spec., you can still make the whole system brand new for around $200 to $250. So it only makes sense to do it once and do it right so you can trust them from then on.
 

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Remove the drums and have them condition checked. The specs for your brakes are 10.000"+0.060, with runout less than 0.007" The +0.060 is the allowable "turning" dimension, meaning when new 10.000" +/- 0.007" top to bottom applies. As they wear and are reworked the drums are bad when the reworked dimension exceeds 10.060". If the runout (dimension at top minus dimension at bottom exceeds 0.007" then the brakes will assuredly pull right/left which is undesirable. Moreover, sizes 10.030" and larger require oversize shoes. Sizes between 10.000" and 10.030" can use standerd shoes. No one arcs shoes anymore so be sure to use the correct size.

Replace all wheel cylinders with new Wagners or other recognized brand. Be wary of those parts at bargain basement prices.

Examine all springs and brake parts for wear. The "nails" often are worn excessively on the sides and may require replacement. These "nails" come in two lengths...long for the front and short for the rear. The difference between them is about 3/8" so be sure to use the correct ones. All springs should be in good shape with no significant wear marks.

You can get brake parts kits to replace all parts but don't throw away the old parts before comparing with the new ones. If new ones aren't like the old ones be wary.

The auto adjust cables almost always need replacement.

The shop manual shows the right side wheels, so its easy to screw up installing the shoes. The primary shoe is the shoe with the shorter length braking surface...it always goes towards the front of the car. The longer shoe always goes to the back, nearest the rear of the car.
 

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It supprised me also.....seems there is a loophole in the NHSTA regs...I found out about it the hard way....a brand new set of Raybestos drums fractured (yes 6" cracks in both) caused by applying the brakes moderately firm at 70mph when a car cut me off. They refused to do anything about it. The machine shop I took em to to get the new ones pressed on kept em to this day (to the best of my knowledge) after 40 years in business they have never seen anything like that before
 
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