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Spammer Hammer
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9,423 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Finally got time to take some more pics and decided to go ahead and start a build thread. Since I have yet be successful at uploading decent quality pics from my phone or my camera that meet maximum file size limitations, I went ahead and created a Photobucket account. So I will post pics there for viewing. Now I will say my build may not progress as quickly as some here but my goal is to finish within two years and hopefully push that as close to one as possible.

Link to photobucket:

1965 TRAKUPE Photos by patrickstapler | Photobucket
 

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Great starter car!
 

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Spammer Hammer
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9,423 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Yeah it wasn't in too bad of shape. I don't think I took a picture yet, but the passenger quarter was previously hacked. So it is now removed. I have a NOS Ford quarter ready to go on. I wish my '65 FB was in as good condition as this coupe.
 

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Spammer Hammer
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Discussion Starter #6
Well the I built the engine 15 years ago for my '65 FB. Only assembled the short block. Don't remember the specs on the cam other than it is a off the shelf Crane with Crane 1.6 roller rockers. Will probably swap this for a custom grind prior to installation. Engine is .040 over, flat tops, internally balanced and blueprinted. Heads are original 289 ported and polished with I believe 2.020 intake and 1.600 exhaust valve. Plan on installing Edelbrock Air Gap intake. Already have a Holly 650 DP.

Tranny is Toploader 4 speed with Ceterforce clutch. Plan on installing all vert pieces for chassis stiffening.

Suspension and brakes is planned to be SorT Stage 4. Plan in installing a Autopower Bolt-in Roll Cage but rather welding it in with larger foot plates and installing straight rear bars to the rear frame rails rather than the inner wheel house.

Currently considering Showwheels Streeter Black for wheels.


Body will have R model front valance and glass hood. Paint scheme planned to be Vintage Burgundy (original car color) with blacked out hood, cowel (maybe), decklid (maybe), and tail light bezel.
 

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The Autopower is a nice piece. I'm not real crazy about the slip tubes they use to join the pieces, so I'm going to use 8" sections that fit inside the bar tubes to join them together. Hope you make your timeline.
 

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Spammer Hammer
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9,423 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I wasn't crazy about the slip fit tubes either. But it is SCCA and NASA approved.

Me too. Pushing as hard as I can while trying to also finish up a 7 year whole home renovation. Dollars are starting to tighten a little also. So we'll see.
 

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Like the FB, a pretty clean body to start with,..nice.

Got any finished pics of what you're building,...not your car but any car?
 

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Looking good Patrick, I'm doing the passenger wheelhouse and quarter now as well. I wish mine was NOS, I had to order 2 to get a decent fitting one. Both were Golden Legion but a few irregularities with both in different location mind you. I ended up buying 2 fro the drivers side as well, a Golden Legion and a Goodmark. The Goodmark was the nicest fit.
 

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Spammer Hammer
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9,423 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
I guess there are definitely worse. Needed right rear quarter and trunk drop off, radiator support and inner apron. Doors are bad. Front fenders could possibly be repaired. Frame rails are all solid. Floor is mostly good with some pitting but is still solid everywhere. Needs cowl hats but cowl is solid. I have designed some to install from the inside. Having them laser cut and rolled with flanges fully perimeter tig welded. We'll see how it goes.
 

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Spammer Hammer
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Discussion Starter #16
Well I learned today that I suck at welding upside down. I got all of the top and bottom welds on the first inner rocker finished today. Started welding the floor to the rocker and everything went to hell from there. I won't show pics because it's really embarrassing. Now I'm not a welder and dont claim to be, but it was really bad.

Any suggestions on changing the process wold be welcome.
 

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Spammer Hammer
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Discussion Starter #18
Would be nice to have...buuuuuut I dont. I just need to dial in my welder. Aside from the challenge of welding under the car (where a piece of slag landed on my left chest, burned through two shirts and into the muscle), trying to weld thin floor material to thick rocker material is a little challenging...at least for me.
 

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Would be nice to have...buuuuuut I dont. I just need to dial in my welder. Aside from the challenge of welding under the car (where a piece of slag landed on my left chest, burned through two shirts and into the muscle), trying to weld thin floor material to thick rocker material is a little challenging...at least for me.
Here are some of the things I learned about with inverted MIG welding. For the thick / thin material setups, make very sure there are NO gaps between your two metals. If both pieces are securely touching each other, the thinner material will not blow away. If you are completely inverted, turn your wire speed down. Gravity has an interesting (and painful) effect on the weld puddle. The slower wire speed will help you get the proper amount of weld placed without it dripping. Turn your welder up, and move faster. This can apply to any plug / rosette weld, depending on the condition of the material being welded. If you normally set your machine for 20ga material (I am assuming your welder is running .023" with shielding gas) for instance, go up a couple of heat ranges and practice on some scrap. There are "recommendations" for different gauge materials on the inside door of most welders. Set it for the thicker portion and get used to the setup.
Watch the edge of your hole. As you are actually filling up the area you can see the liquid metal level out with the surface once it is full. STOP at that point, but make sure the drilled hole is completely full of weld. This also helps with the dreaded grinding, not as much material to remove, and it is a very strong spot weld.
Practice, Practice, Practice... there are bunches of techniques that can be applied to welding, and everyone has their own unique way of applying a weld bead. Set up a scrap piece inverted, position it to where you are comfortable (one of the biggest factors) and play with your settings and application speeds. If I can do it, I know anyone can, if they try.

 
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