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Discussion Starter #1
So after I blew my stock 2 core steel radiator, I put in a 3-row aluminum radiator and while it has kept my pony superbly cool, the temp gauge now barely moves above 'C'

I still have my stock thermostat that came in my 289 installed in my 302 block that is now in the car. What would you all recommend for getting my temp gauge up a litle more? I barely get any heat in the winter.
 

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My guess is you have a lower temp thermostat or it is stuck open. I would start with another thermostat for stock temp (195?).
 

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I would start by getting a real measurement... "C" doesn't mean anything...you need an actual temperature...either through a gauge or use a laser thermometer. It may well be just fine on temp...the 50 year old idiot light doesn't tell you anything.
 

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I would start by getting a real measurement... "C" doesn't mean anything...you need an actual temperature...either through a gauge or use a laser thermometer. It may well be just fine on temp...the 50 year old idiot light doesn't tell you anything.
Good point. So if I am hitting 195 and it is staying around there, I know the thermostat is at least opening at that point, but if I never get above...say 160, I might have what cruising68 is describing?
 
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Most engines like to run in the 200-210 degree range. Putting in a 195* should bring your temp up (maybe even on the gauge). Otherwise, you'd have to go to a "*******" thermostat (a piece of cardboard over part of the front of the radiator.
 

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Most engines like to run in the 200-210 degree range. Putting in a 195* should bring your temp up (maybe even on the gauge). Otherwise, you'd have to go to a "*******" thermostat (a piece of cardboard over part of the front of the radiator.
Actually....that is a thing from the modern era...180 used to be the standard t-stat temp before emissions became what they are, resulting in a running temp of 185-195. From an efficiency standpoint you are correct though...most modern engines were designed to run 200-210. I myself prefer to give up some efficiency for a cooler running temperature...especially if running boost or a lot of timing since the temperature can rise so quickly under a hard run.(I have seen a 25 degree change in under 5 seconds before on some of my datalogs from turbocharged engines....kinda wild to watch if you have a digital temp gauge set up on a laptop while you are tuning)
 

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Actually....that is a thing from the modern era...180 used to be the standard t-stat temp before emissions became what they are, resulting in a running temp of 185-195. From an efficiency standpoint you are correct though...most modern engines were designed to run 200-210. I myself prefer to give up some efficiency for a cooler running temperature...especially if running boost or a lot of timing since the temperature can rise so quickly under a hard run.(I have seen a 25 degree change in under 5 seconds before on some of my datalogs from turbocharged engines....kinda wild to watch if you have a digital temp gauge set up on a laptop while you are tuning)
You are about to open up a whole can of worms by saying that 180 is the stock temp on the vintage mustang. Whole lot of people here will tell you that 192 was the stock thermostat. I usually just sit back and watch the show when this conversation starts. Lol
 

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You are about to open up a whole can of worms by saying that 180 is the stock temp on the vintage mustang. Whole lot of people here will tell you that 192 was the stock thermostat. I usually just sit back and watch the show when this conversation starts. Lol
Actually I have no idea what the stock temp t-stat on a vintage mustang is, I just know that 195 wasnt the standard until the emissions era, prior to that it was all over the place depending what a particular OEM decided made that engine run the best.
 

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I think the shop manual calls for one of two thermostats, a warm and a warmer. I know that’s not exact and I’ll check my manual later for exact wording. I looked them up once and I recall that translated to 180 and 192. I run the 180. It sounds like you might have a fail safe unit that freezes in the open position when it fails. If you have a hand held checker use it to determine what your temp really is. If not put a quality 180 in and you should see the needle move up. Is your heater blowing hot? That’s a good indicator.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
my heater barely blows warm air
 

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You are about to open up a whole can of worms by saying that 180 is the stock temp on the vintage mustang. Whole lot of people here will tell you that 192 was the stock thermostat. I usually just sit back and watch the show when this conversation starts. Lol
I'm too lazy to crack open the MPC but the 1966 Mustang Factory Shop Manual isn't specific. It has a box on page 11-10 that says
THERMOSTATS...... LOW TEMPERATURE...... opens 155-162 degrees on the 289. Fully open at 182 degrees.
The bottom of the box says HIGH TEMPERATURE...... opens 188-195 degrees on the 289. Fully open at 210-212 degrees.

My educated guess is their low temp thermostat is marked 180 degrees and the high temp one is marked 195. (if a 195 wasn't being marketed
back then, it's probably 192 degree)
 

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Actually I have no idea what the stock temp t-stat on a vintage mustang is, I just know that 195 wasnt the standard until the emissions era, prior to that it was all over the place depending what a particular OEM decided made that engine run the best.
Ahem. Well.....back in the '60's OEM's got serious about all kinds of racing and threw a LOT of engineers at figuring out how to be faster than the next guys. Right about then they figured out the optimal operating temperatures for high performance were pretty high and also happened to note those same temperatures worked pretty well for the stock engines. Credit is usually given to the NASCAR folks for nailing that down and passing the info back to the factories. Back in the '60's 195F thermostats were used to maximize performance and efficiency, and still are today. Though it must be said that many manufacturers are pushing engines to run hotter for fuel efficiency reasons (mostly) and also a bit more performance. The reason for that is just because they now have tighter controls on the engines and better oils. If they could have gotten away with running engines hotter 60 years ago, they would have. And some did.
The higher temperatures did nothing for emissions, running engines leaner for emissions (early '70's) happened to make them run a bit hotter. Still true today, a lean engine runs hotter. When the catalytic converters came in that incidentally added more heat because the converters had to run so hot to have the desired effect. This heat was mostly centered around the converter itself but there was a bit of pushback effect on the entire exhaust back to the engine.

For those interested, Nascar is running their cars even hotter these days. You think your car is running hot at 220F? They're purposely running theirs up to 290F. More about it here-
 
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