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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All! So glad to find this forum!

I recently got a 1966 Mustang for my teenage son. The vehicle number indicates it's a 6 cycl hardtop, which is half correct, as I knew a different engine had been put in.*We are not mechanics but would like to learn how to do engine repairs. So far we've done spark plugs and shocks but are having issues with it not shifting.

First off, how can I determine what engine this is? I THINK it is a 289 Hi-Po...but I can't find a number on the bottom of the oil pan.

Can you guys look in my "garage" pics and steer me where to identify the motor? (actually it looks like I can add to thread) I figure you won't be able to answer any questions until I can state that.

Thanks so much...excited to have found this place!


-John & Jake
 

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Hi All! So glad to find this forum!

I recently got a 1966 Mustang for my teenage son. The vehicle number indicates it's a 6 cycl hardtop, which is half correct, as I knew a different engine had been put in.*We are not mechanics but would like to learn how to do engine repairs. So far we've done spark plugs and shocks but are having issues with it not shifting.

First off, how can I determine what engine this is? I THINK it is a 289 Hi-Po...but I can't find a number on the bottom of the oil pan.

Can you guys look in my "garage" pics and steer me where to identify the motor? (actually it looks like I can add to thread) I figure you won't be able to answer any questions until I can state that.

Thanks so much...excited to have found this place!


-John & Jake

The chances of that engine being a Hipo is slim to none. That is, if you're talking about a correct K code Hipo engine. But look for numbers.. Above the starter on a v8 there will be numbers as in something starting with C5,D1,E5... Something of that nature. Which will tell you the year. Chances are, it is just a regular 289/302. If you look (from underneath) on the passenger side... toward the exhaust port hold closest to the front of the car... there will be a vin number that would indicate it being a HIPO block. Thats where you should start.
 

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Welcome! The engine shown in your picture could be anything from a 221 to a 260, 289 or 302. Like "nipples" says, chances of it being a HiPo are slim.....just at first glance it doesn't have a HiPo distributor...

Behind the starter motor, cast into the block, is a casting number and, right above it, a date code. That will give you a general idea. On the front of the block on the driver's side, above the oil filter and right at the "parting line" where the cylinder head sits, is a small pad with a stamped assembly date code, as well. Also, if the engine is post 1-1-68 it SHOULD have a partial VIN stamped at the rear of the block, just off to the driver's side a tad. Other than that, pulling the oil pan and having a peek at the crank along with a quick measure of the cylinder bore diameter will tell you everything you need to know.
 

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Welcome!

Be aware if the car was originally a 6-cylinder Mustang, it came from the factory very different from a V8 Mustang. It's perfectly OK to install a V8, but it should be done correctly to keep the car safe. Here are some areas which should be upgraded:

- Brakes
- Front and rear springs
- Shocks
- Rear differential

If you do some searches here on VMF, you will find many discussions about this.

If your son's Mustang has an automatic, and it's not shifting correctly, it could be most anything; low fluid, improperly adjusted shift linkage, clogged transmission filter, failing vacuum modulator (or it's not connected). Unfortunately, it could also be completely shot and require a rebuild. It's hard to tell. So, I would suggest...

- Check the trans fluid. The engine must be at operating temperature and idling in "Park". Is the fluid at the proper level? Does it look nice and pink, or dark brown?


- Is the vacuum modulator connected? That's a small, canister-looking part on the transmission. It will have a single vacuum port which should have a hose connecting it to another vacuum port on the intake manifold.


Based on the picture, I would politely suggest you work on the fuel line. It doesn't need to be that long and I'm concerned it might rub or get caught on something which could create a leak. FYI, Edelbrock sells a 90 degree fuel inlet for the carburetor. It's called a "Banjo Fitting". It makes running the fuel line a little easier and it's inexpensive. Any auto parts store should be order it and it just threads in like a bolt.
 
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I still see the single pot master cylinder in your picture. As was said, there are many things that must be changed to make it a safe V8 car.
 

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Looks like the car has been converted to 5 lug already. That is good. Are you sure it was originally a 6 cylinder? If you post the first 5 of the VIN we will know for sure. I'm also wondering what brakes you are running.
 

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Whoa...awesome responses. So much to look into!

I'm going to go through each response again carefully and then get to digging around, see what I can figure out. Thanks, and I'll get back soon...
 

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hate to tell you now that it looks like you're done, but it appears you've left out one of your shock lower bolt rubber washers... it's sitting on the strut brace passenger's side about 6" from the shock.....
 

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hate to tell you now that it looks like you're done, but it appears you've left out one of your shock lower bolt rubber washers... it's sitting on the strut brace passenger's side about 6" from the shock.....
I saw that and just thought it was a washer for the air cleaner lid.
 

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Welcome to VMF! I will agree with the statement about that master cylinder needing to go. My first car was a 66" I6 with that same master. It eventually failed on me, and I T-boned a pickup truck. Literally just had ZERO brakes. Wasn't a good day.
 

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Good looking out on that rubber washer! That's the old tattered one. New ones made it on.

Okay, so first things first...let me reiterate- we are not mechanics, not only that, this is our first attempt to work on a car at all so please be patient.

So I looked all around the starter and cannot find a number. Might I need to take the starter off to find it?

Next question, Fastback97 asked "Does that fuel hose reach your fan?" Answer: I don't know. Which hose do you mean? Where is it supposed to reach?

Thanks for your patience everyone!
 

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Well, I figured if I was going to ask questions I should know exactly what engine is in it.

I found a picture online and it does appear that the number is hiding directly behind the starter and it seems it has to be removed to identify it.
 

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Well, I figured if I was going to ask questions I should know exactly what engine is in it.

I found a picture online and it does appear that the number is hiding directly behind the starter and it seems it has to be removed to identify it.
Surprisingly, that won't tell you much. You'll know what year, and what type of block, i.e., 289 or 302.

However, if you want to know if it's a 289HP, that won't tell you. The 289 2V, 289 4V, and 289 High Performance all used the same engine block, so the same number would be found on all of them.

Here's some reading material:

http://www.hipomustang.com/images/hipoeng/
 

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At the front, driver side of the engine is a squiggly metal tube about the diameter of your pinky. That's the "hard" fuel line coming from the fuel pump. The top end of that line should point toward the carburetor. For some reason, yours is pointing toward the front of the car.

As you can see in the picture, connected to the hard fuel line is a rubber fuel line about the diameter of your index finger. It's currently running in a half-loop toward the front the engine, perhaps dangerously close to the engine fan.

The small canister next to the oil dip stick is a fuel filter. From there the fuel line runs to the carburetor. I would politely suggest you cut out some of that fuel line and run it behind the distributor instead of in front of it. This makes it less likely the fuel line will rub or get caught on something.

The comments about the brake master cylinder refer to the fact that modern master cylinders have two reservoirs. Yours has one. This is not as safe as a "dual bowl" master cylinder. This is because if your brake system develops a leak. all the fluid can leak out leaving the car with no brakes. With a dual bowl, the braked are divided into front wheels and rear wheels. If one side leaks, the other will still work.

Does the car have 4 or 5 lug nuts on each wheel?
 

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IF you have a single-bowl master cylinder and IF you have a poorly-maintained brake system and IF you have a hand brake that doesn't work for beans then maybe it would be a good idea to install a dual-bowl master. My '66 still has the single-bowl master but I DO have a dual-bowl on the shelf to go on in the Spring. If you have drum brakes all around you can pick up a '67 manual drum brake master cylinder and convert it. If you go with disc brakes on the front you can swap to a '74 Maverick manual disc brake master, Raybestos #MC36440.

As the others have said, check on that fuel line. I am a stickler for running a hard line directly from pump to carb with no rubber hose under pressure. I've had one engine fire from a split hose that wasn't more than 6 months old and never want another.
 

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If you go with disc brakes on the front you can swap to a '74 Maverick manual disc brake master, Raybestos #MC36440.
Nice. Is it designed for use without a booster? Easy hookup using old two lines in? Does brake rod length change?


As the others have said, check on that fuel line. I am a stickler for running a hard line directly from pump to carb with no rubber hose under pressure. I've had one engine fire from a split hose that wasn't more than 6 months old and never want another.
+1. Edelbrock makes a hard line "L" fitting to replace the banjo bolt with screw in fuel filter. From there you can hookup an AN steel braided line to fuel pump with flare at the pump.
http://www.jegs.com/i/Edelbrock/350/8134/10002/-1?CAWELAID=1710863616&CAGPSPN=pla&catargetid=230006180003463639&cadevice=c&gclid=COib89SOq8oCFcEWHwodQoYMaw
 

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Nice. Is it designed for use without a booster? Easy hookup using old two lines in? Does brake rod length change?
Yes, it's made for a manual disc setup. Use with your old brake push rod...it has the groove to retain it. You'll need an adjustable proportioning valve and 10# residual valve to add in-line in the rear brake circuit and use the original distribution block with the rear port plugged. My recommendation is to make up 2 new lines from the master to the proportioning valve and distribution block...you can use pre-made 3/16 line with adapters on the M/C end or get the correct-size 3/16 tube nuts for the M/C end...the threads are different than original.....

Primary Outlet Size: 7/16"x24
Secondary Outlet Size: 9/16"x18
 

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My 65 was a converted from a six cylinder as well. One of the first things I had to do was upgrade the steering linkage to the heavier duty V8 items. Something to check. I don't know how to describe the six cylinder component's but when you compare them to their V8 cousins they look spindly as heck.

Good luck with the car. Make sure your son understands these cars are not to be taken lightly. There is a 5 ft. steel shaft pointing at your chest so following distance is crucial. Lots of threads on that here on the forum so we don't need to go onto that but I suggest you read them...
 
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