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My 65 was a converted from a six cylinder as well. One of the first things I had to do was upgrade the steering linkage to the heavier duty V8 items. Something to check. I don't know how to describe the six cylinder component's but when you compare them to their V8 cousins they look spindly as heck.

Good luck with the car. Make sure your son understands these cars are not to be taken lightly. There is a 5 ft. steel shaft pointing at your chest so following distance is crucial. Lots of threads on that here on the forum so we don't need to go onto that but I suggest you read them...
Good point here about the safety aspect with the steering column. If the car doesn't already have them, get proper 3 point seat belts in there. This should be high on the ol' priorities list.
 

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You have been given lots of suggestions.

o are you near local Mustang club. or near a vintage Ford club?

o do you have a friend who is mechanically inclined?

o looking at your posted pic it looks like a lot of quick fixes have been done. Non original changes aren't necessarily
bad. It's kinda like DIY electrician or plumbing. Temporary hook ups may work temporarily but be unsafe.

Recommend you get a 66 Ford/Mustang shop manual, maybe even a Chilton. Start with brakes. If the original set up has
temporary band aids or needs repair that's a life and death issue before big worry about single reservoir master cylinder.

Engine. The fuel system should be first concern. Whoever swapped the engine mangled the original gas line and hooked up
a long hose over to the carburetor. That may in fact work for years but it indicates quick sloppy work that may cause
problems any time.

Not to be picky but the chrome air cleaner, valve covers with the chrome wing quick remove nuts are pretty but ignore
real potential safety issues.

New shocks and spark plugs were nice starting projects with your son, but safety issues should be first concern.

By the way what made you think the engine is a hi po (K code). It may in fact be a hi po. So you understand why we
are in doubt.
o K code cars demand a big premium. Original K (hi po) engines, and their accessories demand big money
for restoring iconic K code cars. As an engine swap way more power can be gotten from a modified 289
for a lot less money.

o the 4 barrel carb A code Mustangs were very popular 65-67 and the dress up (chrome) stuff was very
popular. Many looked at this and thought "hi po".

o many put dual exhaust on a A codes. As a reminder if your car has duals the driver side pipe should have
the brake line modified for dual exhaust to keep the brake line from getting too hot causing brake failure.

Not to swamp you, there's a lot to check out other that added non stock safety improvements.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Hey All, we're taking off for a couple days but didn't want to leave all these really important and thoughtful responses without a quick post. I've got a friend, who used to be a mechanic, coming over Monday to go over all your suggestions and advice. Can't thank you all enough for all of this! Hopefully one day we'll be able to contribute, and I can tell already I should upgrade membership to help support the site.

So...I bought this car from my nephew on the cheap because he just didn't have time to work on her. He had it appraised and the guy said if it was a "rust-bucket" (which it isn't) he'd value it at around 15K. Either the appraiser didn't know what he was talking about, or there's something special here. Either way we're fine on the deal because we only paid $3500 and if you check out the pics in my "garage" you'll see a really nice body and a pretty immaculate interior.

Thanks again for the lengthy answers!
 

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More than likely it's a 289 or 302. Count the number of bolts holding the bell housing to the block. That will eliminate it being a 221 0r 260. If the assembly date is anywhere in 1966 it's a 289. The car looks pretty good for a $3500 buy.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Well, I found a number stamped into the block, just behind the intake manifold near the firewall. From what I can find online it just doesn't seem to make sense.

8R110012

So what do you guys think?
 

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Well that number tells you virtually nothing as that is the partial VIN for the car it came in originally. It does tell you it was a '68. So, that is probably enough for what you need to know?
 

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Well, I found a number stamped into the block, just behind the intake manifold near the firewall. From what I can find online it just doesn't seem to make sense.

8R110012

So what do you guys think?
'68 Model Year
Assembled in San Jose
Sequential Serial 110012.

No 289 HiPo's in '68 so it's either a 289-2V "C" code or a 302-4V "J" code. Pulling a valve cover will tell. The 289 will have "289" cast into it and probably a "2A" in the lower left outside corner. The 302 will have "302" cast into it.
 
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