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Discussion Starter #1
Hello Folks,

I was wondering, the 3 speed manual in a factory equipped 1967 6 cyl Mustang, Is the V8 Factory equipped 3 speed the same trans or like the C4s were the 6 cyl ones different?

Thanks for your help

Cheers. Peter
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hello, sorry I dont know those designations but assume those are the ratios

Arw the transmissions different other than ratio? I.e. strength?

Cheers Peter
 

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Hello, sorry I dont know those designations but assume those are the ratios

Arw the transmissions different other than ratio? I.e. strength?

Cheers Peter
Those numbers refer to the distance between the centerline of the mainshaft and the countershaft. The 2.77 has a non-synchronized 1st gear so you either need to know how to "double clutch" or you need to wait until the car is stopped before downshifting into 1st gear. Needless to say most 2.77 owners are looking for a 3.03 to swap.
As stated by m656m, I believe the 2.77 was discontinued for '67.
 

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He's using Ford terminology. The 2.77 is the compact, lightweight 3-speed manual transmission that was standard equipment in 170/200 I6 Mustangs in 65-66. The brutally strong 3.03 3-speed manual transmission replaced it in 1967 in the Mustang. And yes, the designation comes from the first gear ratio. The 3.03 wasn't just strong, it was used as the standard transmission in cars from 200 cid to 390 cid. The 3.03 actually shares design specifications and some internal parts with the legendary Ford Design 4-speed transmission.

Provisions were made in 1966 to upgrade to the 3.03 transmission. The 1966 and later 200 I6 had two bolt patterns on the back end, one for the earlier small bellhousing, which the I6 C4 transmission continued, and one for the larger V8 size bellhousing, used by the 3.03.

One other casualty of the change is the 4-speed option for the I6 was dropped in 1967. The Dagenham 4-speed filled this role in 65-66, but was such a slow seller it was discontinued. Of course, the Ford Design could have been installed in 1967, but since no one was buying the earlier version, Ford didn't bother.

They had different plans, originally. In 65-66, it was possible to buy a six-cylinder Mustang with a 4-speed transmission and 3.50:1 Equalock rear axle. But the performance crowd went straight for the V8, bypassing the surprisingly sporty 200/4-sp/3.50 version. Too bad. Pretty nice, but I have seen only two.

Nowadays, it's an easy conversion to put a T5 5-speed in these cars. Really wakes them up, even with no change to the rear axle.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
He's using Ford terminology. The 2.77 is the compact, lightweight 3-speed manual transmission that was standard equipment in 170/200 I6 Mustangs in 65-66. The brutally strong 3.03 3-speed manual transmission replaced it in 1967 in the Mustang. And yes, the designation comes from the first gear ratio. The 3.03 wasn't just strong, it was used as the standard transmission in cars from 200 cid to 390 cid. The 3.03 actually shares design specifications and some internal parts with the legendary Ford Design 4-speed transmission.

Provisions were made in 1966 to upgrade to the 3.03 transmission. The 1966 and later 200 I6 had two bolt patterns on the back end, one for the earlier small bellhousing, which the I6 C4 transmission continued, and one for the larger V8 size bellhousing, used by the 3.03.

One other casualty of the change is the 4-speed option for the I6 was dropped in 1967. The Dagenham 4-speed filled this role in 65-66, but was such a slow seller it was discontinued. Of course, the Ford Design could have been installed in 1967, but since no one was buying the earlier version, Ford didn't bother.

They had different plans, originally. In 65-66, it was possible to buy a six-cylinder Mustang with a 4-speed transmission and 3.50:1 Equalock rear axle. But the performance crowd went straight for the V8, bypassing the surprisingly sporty 200/4-sp/3.50 version. Too bad. Pretty nice, but I have seen only two.

Nowadays, it's an easy conversion to put a T5 5-speed in these cars. Really wakes them up, even with no change to the rear axle.
Thank you 22, very kind of you to explain all that

Cheers Peter
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Those numbers refer to the distance between the centerline of the mainshaft and the countershaft. The 2.77 has a non-synchronized 1st gear so you either need to know how to "double clutch" or you need to wait until the car is stopped before downshifting into 1st gear. Needless to say most 2.77 owners are looking for a 3.03 to swap.
As stated by m656m, I believe the 2.77 was discontinued for '67.
Thank you always appreciate your help

Peter
 

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The same basic 3.03 for the six and eight except the six has a slightly lower first gear. Maybe 2nd as well, not sure. Otherwise the same
 

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RAN D, D1​
1967-68​
Mustang​
289​
-​
-​
-​
-​
RAN S, S1​
1967-68​
Mustang​
200​
-​

Here are the tag numbers. I do not know, other than the tag, if there is any physical difference. I know I have used them interchangeably, and put random "V8" 3 speeds, into 6 cylinder cars without the northern magnetic pole suddenly collapsing and throwing the world off it's orbit and plunging into the sun.
 

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I had replaced 3.03 with a 2.77 48 yrs ago and 1''st gear went boom shortly afterwards, but back then I could break most anything...
 

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My 66 came with a 289 and 3-speed manual. Everything on the car is factory and for ease of install/budget right now, I'm going to put the trans back in. Maybe later I'll upgrade to T5. Assuming I have the better of the two trans being a factory 289 car and not the I6?? Were the 66 V8 3speeds syncroed?
 

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I have a 65 that originally came with the 2.77. Once again it did not have a synchronized 1st gear, and was undersized. It came with a smaller bell housing and a 8.5 inch flywheel, clutch set up. I actually swapped it out for a 3.03 3 speed that came out of a 67 Mustang. This was possible, because I actually have a 66 block/200, which came with a dual bolt pattern. The 3.03 requires a 6 bolt block pattern. It won't bolt up to a 65 200 block. The install included a 67 bell-housing, 9 inch flywheel, clutch set up, and 2 bolt starter housing. Also requires beefier slip yolk that required a specially sized drive shaft. The Integrated (7.5) rear end still works. The 3.03 is a very strong motor. However it is not geared for highway travel. My advise having done this would be to go with the T-5
 

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My 67 3.03 is a RAN S1. It has a synchronized 1st gear.
 

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Are all 3.03s dimensionally the same? Will a truck or full size car 3.03 fit a Mustang?
 

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My 66 came with a 289 and 3-speed manual. Everything on the car is factory and for ease of install/budget right now, I'm going to put the trans back in. Maybe later I'll upgrade to T5. Assuming I have the better of the two trans being a factory 289 car and not the I6?? Were the 66 V8 3speeds syncroed?
All the Mustang V8 3-speed transmissions were fully synchronized.

The 3-speed you have is as strong as the Ford Design 4-speed, and even shares some parts with it.

I have seen V8 3-speed cars converted to T5 5-speed in 3 or 4 hours.
 

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Those numbers refer to the distance between the centerline of the mainshaft and the countershaft. The 2.77 has a non-synchronized 1st gear so you either need to know how to "double clutch" or you need to wait until the car is stopped before downshifting into 1st gear. Needless to say most 2.77 owners are looking for a 3.03 to swap.
As stated by m656m, I believe the 2.77 was discontinued for '67.
I believe you are quite correct, sir and I have misspoken.

My first car was a 66 Sprint, and after I got it running, I had my Dad out for a drive. It was going slowly up a hill by the house, and I cautioned him not to downshift into first. Without a word, he double clutched the 2-1 shift.

Now I frequently drive a vehicle with a non-synchronized 4-speed.
742355
 
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