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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone,

This is my first post here. I’m looking to get my first Mustang, and looking to get some dumb questions answered. TIA.

I’m exclusively looking for a 67-68 Fastback. I’ve been reading a lot of threads here to learn more about what I should be looking out for.

There are not a lot of options for a project car at the moment. I found one that is running, the guy is asking $35k for it. It seems like it was restored at some point, so here are my questions:

1. The front and rear frame rails were replaced, and they don’t show any rust. Is it a concern to buy a car with the rails replaced already ? I know that any car that was restored with frame tust goes through that, and I don’t have a lot of options with a 67-68 with no rust without breaking the bank. Thoughts ?

2. It seems like the body was repaired, and the car is currently primed. I saw a lot of discussion about Bondo, using magnets... etc. But I know for a fact that any restored car has a significant amount of Bondo on it to make it nice again. I guess I’m missing the point of the Bondo check. Unless the car is advertised as rust-free original body, what do I need to look for ?

3. The car is a T code, which is kind of a bummer, as it has some GT exterior features. I’m worried about resale value given that this is probably on the lower end of the Mustangs... I know that the original features don’t affect the car per se, but they still affect the value. This is not an investment, and I doubt that I will ever sell after I restore, but still don't want to invest $70k on a car that is worth $50k after I restore it.

4. It has an automatic transmission, which I really hate lol
Thanks again,
Backer A.
 

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67 vert, 347 EFI, T5
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1) Quality of the structural/body work is something that you or your shop of choice needs to evaluate. Having front and rear rails replaced can be a huge benefit, but you need to evaluate to ensure the work was done properly. Verifying quality of welds, proper alignment in all 3 planes, etc, is important.

2) A properly restored car won't have "significant amount of bondo." Done well, there will be little-to-no bondo. That's why you want to test.

3) Car's original engine option has almost no impact if you're doing much in the way of mods (unless it's a very desirable model). T code isn't a big deal. What engine is in it now? For $35k, you should have either a near-completed build of a V8 motor with all the proper suspension and brake upgrades. Otherwise, I'd suggest continuing to shop. Hard to provide much additional input without knowing more of current condition, what your end goals are, your budget and ability to do your own work.

4) Everything can be changed. Does it fit your budget and/or ability?
 

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I replaced a lot of my panels and skim coated then sanded my whole car. I would say my car was "properly restored", but I still skim coated and sanded. Of course, I am unsure how much filler is needed before the magnet doesn't stick. Welds and panel joints obviously have deeper filler remaining than other areas.
 

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I had half of a long winded reply typed up, but got pulled away from my phone for a while. Husky nailed it.

I will say that for that kind of scratch, I’d want a presentable driver quality paint job. If I wanted to paint it myself, I’d look for one in primer for less money. Prices are weird right now, so you have that to contend with, but yeah. Pricy for no shiny.
 

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Man, I would be hesitant to give 20 for that car from what I see in the photos. I suck at body work and my panel gaps are better than that--which leads me to be incredibly skeptical of the frame rails, torque boxes, etc. That car is sitting high as hell, like he torqued the suspension while it was in the air.

I'm not saying stay away, but I'd inspect the hell, out of it to see what you are getting. And don't pay anywhere near 35.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
red
Man, I would be hesitant to give 20 for that car from what I see in the photos. I suck at body work and my panel gaps are better than that--which leads me to be incredibly skeptical of the frame rails, torque boxes, etc. That car is sitting high as hell, like he torqued the suspension while it was in the air.

I'm not saying stay away, but I'd inspect the hell, out of it to see what you are getting. And don't pay anywhere near 35.
This is great feedback. Thanks a lot. I am going to see on Sunday, but I doubt I’ll like what I’ll see. I already told him before asking about anything that I won’t be paying near what he’s asking. Let’s see!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
1) Quality of the structural/body work is something that you or your shop of choice needs to evaluate. Having front and rear rails replaced can be a huge benefit, but you need to evaluate to ensure the work was done properly. Verifying quality of welds, proper alignment in all 3 planes, etc, is important.

2) A properly restored car won't have "significant amount of bondo." Done well, there will be little-to-no bondo. That's why you want to test.

3) Car's original engine option has almost no impact if you're doing much in the way of mods (unless it's a very desirable model). T code isn't a big deal. What engine is in it now? For $35k, you should have either a near-completed build of a V8 motor with all the proper suspension and brake upgrades. Otherwise, I'd suggest continuing to shop. Hard to provide much additional input without knowing more of current condition, what your end goals are, your budget and ability to do your own work.

4) Everything can be changed. Does it fit your budget and/or ability?
All points are well taken. Thanks for the input. I’m not sure I have the knowledge and/or the experience to verify the alignment or the welds, but will for sure get under it to take a look. I don’t like the body work from the pics, but I’ll see what the magnet tells. I’ll try and feel the quarter
1) Quality of the structural/body work is something that you or your shop of choice needs to evaluate. Having front and rear rails replaced can be a huge benefit, but you need to evaluate to ensure the work was done properly. Verifying quality of welds, proper alignment in all 3 planes, etc, is important.

2) A properly restored car won't have "significant amount of bondo." Done well, there will be little-to-no bondo. That's why you want to test.

3) Car's original engine option has almost no impact if you're doing much in the way of mods (unless it's a very desirable model). T code isn't a big deal. What engine is in it now? For $35k, you should have either a near-completed build of a V8 motor with all the proper suspension and brake upgrades. Otherwise, I'd suggest continuing to shop. Hard to provide much additional input without knowing more of current condition, what your end goals are, your budget and ability to do your own work.

4) Everything can be changed. Does it fit your budget and/or ability?
Points well taken. Thanks for the input. I don’t have the experience/knowledge to evaluate the welds or the alignment, but will for sure go under it to check it out. I don’t like the body work from what I see, but will sure follow your suggestion with the magnet. Price is too high that’s for sure.
 

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You are in a hurry now--you've got a fantasy about a really cool car and you want it bad. The time you take to really learn so you can make a wise, non-emotional decision is literally worth tens of thousands of dollars.

Find someone near you with the knowledge to inspect a prospect car properly. There will be Mustang clubs in the area. Consider joining one, but only if you plan to contribute and not just take their help. Otherwise find a, reputable restoration shop--if you're not going to do the work yourself, find the one you want to do your car, and have them accompany you to inspect.

This site is littered with bad deals and broken dreams, because there are a lot of pitfalls. Do your homework. Know what you can afford, and have a true and sober understanding of what this can cost.

General rule-- bodywork/rust repair is more expensive and takes longer/sucks more than engine /trans/suspension/brakes.... By the best body you can afford. You should be able to find a solid body driver for $35k if you take your time and make an informed decision.

Good luck. This can be fun! 😁
 

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The fact that it is in Los Angeles, and for sale for 18 days, says a LOT.

I am in the Dallas area, and good deals are measured in hours, not days.
Yes, but this is California. You should be thinking; ”a fool and his money are soon parted”.
 

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the most critical point: check the body (which includes the 'frame' as these cars are unibody construction). does the cowl leak? go over it with a magnet (there are specifically made paint / filler thickness checkers out there). fixing a rusted body is the most time consuming and expensive of all the endeavors, so be sure that iffy primer job isn't covering lots of issues. everything else can be replaced with a wrench and some elbow grease.
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
You are in a hurry now--you've got a fantasy about a really cool car and you want it bad. The time you take to really learn so you can make a wise, non-emotional decision is literally worth tens of thousands of dollars.

Find someone near you with the knowledge to inspect a prospect car properly. There will be Mustang clubs in the area. Consider joining one, but only if you plan to contribute and not just take their help. Otherwise find a, reputable restoration shop--if you're not going to do the work yourself, find the one you want to do your car, and have them accompany you to inspect.

This site is littered with bad deals and broken dreams, because there are a lot of pitfalls. Do your homework. Know what you can afford, and have a true and sober understanding of what this can cost.

General rule-- bodywork/rust repair is more expensive and takes longer/sucks more than engine /trans/suspension/brakes.... By the best body you can afford. You should be able to find a solid body driver for $35k if you take your time and make an informed decision.

Good luck. This can be fun! 😁
I am in a hurry lol but I am doing my due diligence and I’ve learnt about this in the past couple of weeks more than what I did on anything else this year lol. I am simply at a stage where I want to start looking at cars and want to know what I’m looking at when I inspect one. All this feedback helps. Thanks a lot!
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
the most critical point: check the body (which includes the 'frame' as these cars are unibody construction). does the cowl leak? go over it with a magnet (there are specifically made paint / filler thickness checkers out there). fixing a rusted body is the most time consuming and expensive of all the endeavors, so be sure that iffy primer job isn't covering lots of issues. everything else can be replaced with a wrench and some elbow grease.
Thanks for the help. The problem is that it is really hard to find an affordable project car with no/limited body work or frame rust. At least it won’t be affordable lol Will keep looking!
 

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Thanks for the help. The problem is that it is really hard to find an affordable project car with no/limited body work or frame rust. At least it won’t be affordable lol Will keep looking!
Unless you can do it yourself, getting a rusted car fixed can be way more expensive than buying one already done. You might want to expand your search area.
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Unless you can do it yourself, getting a rusted car fixed can be way more expensive than buying one already done. You might want to expand your search area.
Thanks. I am looking all over US with no luck finding the right one. Will keep looking. All I find is someone asking a ton of money, or a plain rust bucket.
 
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