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Hey everyone,

Im looking to buy a 67 Mustang Fastback and I am wondering if A codes were a lot rarer than C codes? All I have on this one is the VIN, So I wont know anything else about it until tomorrow, when I receive my Marti Report.

It originally had the vented/ribbed tailight panel also. Ill post more about it tomorrow, but was just wondering if the 67 A code was rarer and more DESIRABLE than the C's. I'd say it was but I would like the opinions of others that may have some facts.

Thanks
 

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1967 Mustang GT fastback
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Well, the A code was a bit rarer than the C code, at least as Road and Track was concerned in their March 1971 used car survey of 1967-69 model year Mustangs. The most popular (ie. common) responses were the 2v small V8's (289 and 302), followed by the 4v small V8's. That would imply that A codes are rarer than C codes -- but not by an awful lot IMHO.
The ribbed panel, OTH, is something rare and notable, especially if in good shape with all or most of the studs intact. That thing cost basically pennies (okay, just a few dollars) when new. Who da thunk it....
 

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67 A codes were a lot rarer than C codes, the 289 4v was an extra $158, but for $264, only $106 more, you could get a 390GT 4v engine. The 289 2v was $106, which left the 4v as the 'middle child'. The 289HP was really the oddity, at $484. Basically, the 390 buried the 289 4v, and killed off the 289HP.
 

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That's the way Ford wanted to go in '67. Price the hipo 289 so it would be silly on a financial basis to buy it as the 390 was priced so much cheaper than the hipo. My father wanted one but the price scared him off when he ordered my car at the dealer. The $484 was just for the hipo itself, then you needed to order the separate option 4 speed too, and possibly the GT option, but I'm not entirely sure of this last one as a mandatory item with the hipo in '67. At any rate, it added up to $700 or more than the A code 289 did, that was a big jump for anyone on a budget.
The hipo 289 was similar to the full out 427 in that relatively few were ordered on a percentage-of-production basis and that number decreased as the years went on. The 427's in Galaxies and Fairlanes were basically a $1000 motor option in a 3 thousand dollar car. The 427's had a good following in 63, then 64, dwindled in 65, more down in 66, and just a few in 67, and then POOF! Basically gone. Hipo 289 was priced to follow a similar fate, gone at end of 67 model year. Sad......
 

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Pretty much any K code ordered in 1967 was either a GT or GTA. That is how Ford made their money on the package, by adding all of those things up as others have mentioned, they made it cost prohibitive to buy the HiPo 289. Thus it was the rarest of the small blocks. Throw in the fact that a majority of them (75%) were destined to be GT-350's and that left the few others remaining as good ol K codes for our enjoyment.

A codes are nothing to scoff at, but it really just matters as to what the buyer wants and has planned as to whether to buy an A, C, K, T, or S code. If you intend on radical changes, just get the C code and mod away with a clear conscience and lighter wallet in the process.
 

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IMO there is not enough of a value difference to keep you from doing whatever you want to the car. Reality is that most of the buyers out there are more interested in "eyeball" as oppose to "correct".
 

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That's the way Ford wanted to go in '67. Price the hipo 289 so it would be silly on a financial basis to buy it as the 390 was priced so much cheaper than the hipo. My father wanted one but the price scared him off when he ordered my car at the dealer. The $484 was just for the hipo itself, then you needed to order the separate option 4 speed too, and possibly the GT option, but I'm not entirely sure of this last one as a mandatory item with the hipo in '67. At any rate, it added up to $700 or more than the A code 289 did, that was a big jump for anyone on a budget.
The hipo 289 was similar to the full out 427 in that relatively few were ordered on a percentage-of-production basis and that number decreased as the years went on. The 427's in Galaxies and Fairlanes were basically a $1000 motor option in a 3 thousand dollar car. The 427's had a good following in 63, then 64, dwindled in 65, more down in 66, and just a few in 67, and then POOF! Basically gone. Hipo 289 was priced to follow a similar fate, gone at end of 67 model year. Sad......
++agree. As I recall (I was in love with Mustangs from the start...see my sig)the Mustang was made wider for 67 to accomodate big blocks. They saw Chev and Pontiac comming with their pony cars and Ford added the Cougar to counter Pontiac. The base big block Ford was the 390. Cost to produce the 390 was very little more than the 289 so they could easily set the selling price to compete with the Camero and Firebird.

The K code...hi po. The K code hi po 289 carried a high price tag from the start. I ordered my 64 1/2 Convertible with 289 4V, 4 speed, performance handling package and accent (pinstripe). The K code would have made it very close to an average driver to a Shelby. IMO the K code was priced artificially high from the start to encourage Shelby sales.

Maybe part of the Shelby agreement...conspiracy?

We sure have digressed from the original posting!

Slim
 
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