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1967 Convertible
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676 Posts
Discussion Starter #22


Column came off the shaft with some gentle persuasion from a crowbar.

Now to the stuff like the sunvisors before moving back.

I can take the convertible top off now but I'm not sure where to store it. I still need to remove the transmission and rear end.

And then the front suspension. But I'm getting somewhere.

Someone on Facebook offered me a steering column from a 68 for $150 but I really don't want to invest in any parts until I have funded the media blasting and sheet metal work. Plus it's just more stuff to store.
 

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1967 Convertible
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676 Posts
Discussion Starter #23


These corner pieces are pretty crusty. I bet they will be fun to find.



I'm going to need to remember to seal all these parts when they go back together.



At this point I'd love to have a bolt-in automatic with OD to replace the C4. Body first, then mechanics.



Just about everything out and I can see how bad the floor is. Once I get it blasted I'll know how bad the rockers are.



Just the e-brake left to remove. I suspect I'll need to wait until I get under the car to remove the trans and rear end to tend to the brake cable.



It doesn't look horrible back here. As long as you don't look at the floor.



Just vestiges of where the seat hold down screw goes.
 

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7T03T121875 - 10/5/66 build
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Lol! Rust is the one thing I can't make art with on a car. I'm better than the average bear with a paint gun, but I'm a grease guy first, a dust guy second, panel cutter and beater somewhere way down the line past that. I envy the people who can wade into one with a grinder and a welder.
 

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1967 Convertible
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Discussion Starter #29
Lol! Rust is the one thing I can't make art with on a car. I'm better than the average bear with a paint gun, but I'm a grease guy first, a dust guy second, panel cutter and beater somewhere way down the line past that. I envy the people who can wade into one with a grinder and a welder.
I’m not bright enough to know what I’m in for. But I’m just of the mind that if someone put it together once it can come apart and go back together. At least that’s the theory.

Maybe I get in over my head, then I just see if I can get help.
 

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My first restoration was a 1956 Chevy Bel Air. It needed a quarter Replacement. Floor and trunk repair. I knew it would take me three years and it would cost $40,000 . I didn’t have the money, I didn’t have the tools I needed, and I really didn’t have the space but I wanted to do it.

I stuck with it learned a lot and I wouldn’t of given that up for a moment.
The thing is it’s always going to cost more, be tougher, take longer, then anything Estimated.

I’ve seen and heard of many cars being fixed up that were worth less and they actually had more money in it than it was worth when they were done. But they stuck with it they got their restoration done and they have a beautiful car to drive and something to be very proud of.
Everyone has different reasons why they restore cars some think it’s something easy and it won’t be that difficult only to find out later that it is difficult. Some people really like the work and something to be proud of and even if they only make an inch a day they put forth the effort. Some people want the finished product already done before they ever start and are overwhelmed with all the work. So they quit or they give up. They start justifying reasons to where it makes sense to stop where they’re at and give up.

You’re the one that has to make the decision. It’s do or die.

if it were easy, it wouldn’t be called one of the hardest things in the world to complete.
 

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1967 Convertible
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Discussion Starter #32
My first restoration was a 1956 Chevy Bel Air. It needed a quarter Replacement. Floor and trunk repair. I knew it would take me three years and it would cost $40,000 . I didn’t have the money, I didn’t have the tools I needed, and I really didn’t have the space but I wanted to do it.

I stuck with it learned a lot and I wouldn’t of given that up for a moment.
The thing is it’s always going to cost more, be tougher, take longer, then anything Estimated.

I’ve seen and heard of many cars being fixed up that were worth less and they actually had more money in it than it was worth when they were done. But they stuck with it they got their restoration done and they have a beautiful car to drive and something to be very proud of.
Everyone has different reasons why they restore cars some think it’s something easy and it won’t be that difficult only to find out later that it is difficult. Some people really like the work and something to be proud of and even if they only make an inch a day they put forth the effort. Some people want the finished product already done before they ever start and are overwhelmed with all the work. So they quit or they give up. They start justifying reasons to where it makes sense to stop where they’re at and give up.

You’re the one that has to make the decision. It’s do or die.

if it were easy, it wouldn’t be called one of the hardest things in the world to complete.
Solid words.


Here’s one of my other projects. It took me a couple years partially because I didn’t have a bunch of disposable income at the time. I suspect that some people would look at that pile of parts and think there was no way to go back together. Other people would ask why it took me so long.

 
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