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Beside automatic choke cover, there is hot air pipe, which should be connected here. I don't see any thread in this old manifold, so how this hot air pipe for choke should be connected ?

I have searched CjPony and found out that COMP timing chain is similar, is it good choice ?
I have a 67 289 and the pipe just pushes into to manifold. Pretty low tech.

We used COMP products in the hobby stocks and liked them.
 

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The choke hot air tubes (one top and one bottom) have tapered ends and press in to the holes. A punch and small hammer on the lip can help seat them. Often, a broken off piece is stuck in the hole... a drill bit that fits tightly inside the piece can be screwed in by hand, then grab the bit with pliers and pull. If you have to, drill out the piece but don't make the hole any larger.

For timing sets I have always used Cloyes with good results.

On your separator plate, clean it up well and install it unpainted. Old-school smelly oven cleaner works well to remove old paint and corrosion. You want there to be a good electrical contact between block, plate and transmission so the starter will ground properly. If you decide to paint it afterward, cover the nose of the starter with a plastic bag, stick it in place, paint the plate, then pull the starter and its "masking" and then put it back. Some electrical conductive (NOT silicone dielectric) grease between the starter and plate and on the starter bolts will keep corrosion to a minimum.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
The choke hot air tubes (one top and one bottom) have tapered ends and press in to the holes. A punch and small hammer on the lip can help seat them. Often, a broken off piece is stuck in the hole... a drill bit that fits tightly inside the piece can be screwed in by hand, then grab the bit with pliers and pull. If you have to, drill out the piece but don't make the hole any larger.

For timing sets I have always used Cloyes with good results.

On your separator plate, clean it up well and install it unpainted. Old-school smelly oven cleaner works well to remove old paint and corrosion. You want there to be a good electrical contact between block, plate and transmission so the starter will ground properly. If you decide to paint it afterward, cover the nose of the starter with a plastic bag, stick it in place, paint the plate, then pull the starter and its "masking" and then put it back. Some electrical conductive (NOT silicone dielectric) grease between the starter and plate and on the starter bolts will keep corrosion to a minimum.
Thanks Bart for your advices !!!
I forgot about ground circuit, I will clean it and leave it as it is.
 
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