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I searched the web and this for photos or videos of how to repair the shifter in a 1968 toploader. I wasn't able to find much. The reverse lockout cable is messed up.

Maybe I was searching wrong, can anybody help on a fix?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
he is probably referring to the cable inside the handle

Z
That's what I meant. I guess there's a little wire silver soldered to a washer inside the shifter. I didn't have any luck finding a diagram, they must be out there.
 

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A guy named Bill Healy is the Ford shifter repair/rebuild specialist. I have no idea how to contact him so you're on your own with google.
 

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Nothing wrong with a properly built Ford shifter and lever for the street. Not all of us have the good fortune of owning and driving a vintage race car...of which you should have Hurst Competition, which you do...:ba::ba::ba:
 

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I have repaired a good number of these. The wire stretches or breaks, making the shifter inoperative.

You need a 1/16" diameter steel cable, an actylene torch, and brazing rod.

Braze or weld a small nut to the top end of the wire.

Assemble the lever, and insert a bolt into the top of the lever to hold the wire in place on the T bar or ring. Duct tape the T bar to the lever to keep everything in the full down (normal) position.

Slide the spring and lockout dog onto the lower end of the lever, and wire it into place with the bottom end slightly inside the lever (ideally, it will be exactly even when completed)

Keep tension on the wire, with everything held in place.

Using a very small torch tip, braze the wire in place in the dog.

Trim the excess wire from the bottom of the dog.

If you can do this, you'll save the $160 a new lever would cost you.

 

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Or just disable it. My Hurst competition plus didn’t have any lock out, never needed one, Never accidentally hit reverse, but there was a decent detent to get into reverse, if the stock one doesn’t have a decent detent then perhaps I’ll bets are off


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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he is probably referring to the cable inside the handle

Z

PS not easily repaired by a novice
I have repaired a good number of these. The wire stretches or breaks, making the shifter inoperative.

You need a 1/16" diameter steel cable, an actylene torch, and brazing rod.

Braze or weld a small nut to the top end of the wire.

Assemble the lever, and insert a bolt into the top of the lever to hold the wire in place on the T bar or ring. Duct tape the T bar to the lever to keep everything in the full down (normal) position.

Slide the spring and lockout dog onto the lower end of the lever, and wire it into place with the bottom end slightly inside the lever (ideally, it will be exactly even when completed)

Keep tension on the wire, with everything held in place.

Using a very small torch tip, braze the wire in place in the dog.

Trim the excess wire from the bottom of the dog.

If you can do this, you'll save the $160 a new lever would cost you.

years ago i had a top loader shifter repaired in the manner 22gt suggested. i forget how much it cost me, but it was worth the money.
 

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Nothing wrong with a properly built Ford shifter and lever for the steet. Not all of us have the good fortune of owning and driving a vintage race car...of which you should have Hurst Competition, which you do...:ba::ba::ba:
Years ago, now, I carefully rebuilt a Ford shifter to replace the worn Hurst Competition Plus™ in my 66. The "new" Ford was a big improvement. I've driven a lot of Mustangs, and at least 90% of the Ford shifters I've seen were badly worn, improperly assembled, or both. The #1 problem is incorrect or missing washers on the shoulder bolt heads. The are specially thick, and hardened steel. Thin washers don't compress the rubber bushings enough, and allow the handle to move far too much. Ordinary hardware store washers aren't hardened, either, so they tend to dish, making the handle even more sloppy. And that's just the handle, there are other problems, usually caused severe wear or improper assembly.
 

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A guy named Bill Healy is the Ford shifter repair/rebuild specialist. I have no idea how to contact him so you're on your own with google.
Hes the man to repair that, do a search for him, otherwise get back to me thru,I have his num at home
 

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Hurst vs Ford shifters:

The only 2 advantages that Hurst has in my view are

1). positive stops, which you don't really need if you know how to shift fast AND precisely

&

2). Better rod adjustment engineering, especially if you use the steel bushings instead of those stock Hurst nylon bushings.

Other than that, the Ford shifter is much smoother feeling . In comparison the Hurst feels like you are shifting a truck. I've used them both, and like both of them, for different reasons of course. Once a person gets used to either one, you can shift equally fast and precise regardless of the pluses or minuses one may have over the other.

Z
 

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A guy named Bill Healy is the Ford shifter repair/rebuild specialist. I have no idea how to contact him so you're on your own with google.
I've met Bill Heeley at Carlisle Ford Nationals years ago. I found his business card. His specialty was rebuilding Ford shifters, parts, shifter handles & shifter gates.

BILL HEELEY ... 301.774.6710
3621 MT. Olney Lane, Olney, Maryland :smile2:
 
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