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Yes, it's another alignment thread...I could not make heads or tails of all the threads I dug up.

My car is a 1968 Coupe on coilover fronts, lowered leaf springs on the rear. The car is pretty low, it sits on 25" tires and there is no fender gap on the front, about 1" gap on the rear. I would estimate the front is 3-4" lower than stock.

Is there a good "all around" alignment spec to go with? I don't know much about alignment and was hoping I could get some advice as to how to get it aligned. I plan to go to an alignment shop, but I would feel better if I knew what to ask for and what to double check. I know most modern cars just get the toe adjusted but that's not ideal for our cars.

I would like to get more negative camber on the front if possible just for tire clearance but I am not sure how this is done. Will "regular" alignment shops know how to add shims? Will they even know what they are doing with this car? I'm not picky and I don't need my suspension to be perfect or anything, it's 99% a street car. Are there any kits or parts I need to buy or should the shop have everything I would need?

Thanks everyone!
 

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Yes, it's another alignment thread...I could not make heads or tails of all the threads I dug up.

My car is a 1968 Coupe on coilover fronts, lowered leaf springs on the rear. The car is pretty low, it sits on 25" tires and there is no fender gap on the front, about 1" gap on the rear. I would estimate the front is 3-4" lower than stock.

Is there a good "all around" alignment spec to go with? I don't know much about alignment and was hoping I could get some advice as to how to get it aligned. I plan to go to an alignment shop, but I would feel better if I knew what to ask for and what to double check. I know most modern cars just get the toe adjusted but that's not ideal for our cars.

I would like to get more negative camber on the front if possible just for tire clearance but I am not sure how this is done. Will "regular" alignment shops know how to add shims? Will they even know what they are doing with this car? I'm not picky and I don't need my suspension to be perfect or anything, it's 99% a street car. Are there any kits or parts I need to buy or should the shop have everything I would need?

Thanks everyone!
So.................. assuming your “coilover” fronts still use all stock components (factory Upper and Lower arms, strut rods) I’d go with:

+2 to +3 deg Caster
-0.5 to -1.0 deg camber
1/16in toe in

If you have aftermarket components that has a little more adjustment than factory

+3 to +4 deg caster
-0.5 to -1.0 deg camber
1/16in toe in

To answer your question about more negative camber for tire clearance, that is a no go. Camber on a ‘68 is done by adjusting the eccentric bolt on the lower control where it meets the chassis. Any extra clearance gained would be minimal at best.

Also, shims on the upper control arm to adjust alignment is typically not used. Camber is adjusted as stated above, caster is adjusted by lengthening or shortening the strut rod. But I supposed you can.

If you haven’t done so, reposition the upper control arm 1” lower. Known as the shelby drop or arning drop. Do a search for that, you’ll find what you’re looking for easily. Easy modification that really makes the car handle better. Even for a street car. Damn near free. Do it.

Shop around alignment shops. Most don’t want to touch vintage cars, and if they do, will make you use factory specs, if they can even find them.


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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you. That's very helpful and noted, I'm shopping around for a place that knows the drill on older cars.

I am using aftermarket arms but they are not adjustable, will look at the arning drop this weekend...
 

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Thank you. That's very helpful and noted, I'm shopping around for a place that knows the drill on older cars.

I am using aftermarket arms but they are not adjustable, will look at the arning drop this weekend...
May I suggest a heim jointed strut rod?

They’re easier to adjust, and eliminates fore/aft deflection under braking. Other than that you’re set. Good luck.

I have these:


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Get a refreshment and read through this long thread, it's the best alignment thread here.
You may decide after spending some time reading that you can tackle this yourself, I did and it turned out great.
Setting caster & camber
 

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Just to add to all the above, if you pull the UCA to do the arning drop you can re-clock the UCA shaft forward a quarter inch or so forward which will move the UCA rearward gaining you some positive caster without moving the tire closer to hitting the front of the wheel opening. On my 68 doing that in conjunction with adjustable strut rods I could get 7 degree caster before the tire hit. I set mine at 4.5 degree.
 

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1968 Mustang coupe, 331 engine
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re-clock the UCA shaft forward a quarter inch or so forward which will move the UCA rearward
Can you describe what you mean by reclock the shaft forward? Im struggling to figure out what you mean. the UCA bolts on with those two big bolts. how is the shaft "clocked"?
 

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Brilliant, thanks. Now I have a project lol
 

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While you have it apart, buy or build some roller perches as that will give you a much more compliant ride up front. Adjustable struts are a good idea also. Pretty easy to make both if your so inclined.
 
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