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Discussion Starter #1
I am the proud owner of Mustang Fastback produced in the 12,000 range, born in dearborn September 16th 1967. According to several internet resources (including this one: http://www.geocities.com/~mustangs68/) the nationwide Ford strike started September 6th 1967.

Can anyone tell me how I have a VIN number dated in the middle of the strike? Were Vins stamped weeks in advance and perhaps my vehicle was one of the "dust collectors" in the plants? or are the srike dates incorrect?

-Dan
Vin 8F02C112XXX
Door 63C D 8A 16J 42 E 5
 

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Discussion Starter #2

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The date code on your door plate (16J) is the "scheduled build date" not necessarily the actual build date. Actual build dates and scheduled build dates often differed. For example, according to Kevin Marti, my car was built 6 days prior to its scheduled build date. And, IIRC, Laurie_S picked up her 68 coupe (Murphy) at the factory during the strike having to cross the picket lines to do so. I suggest you contact Kevin Marti for a report on your car to see when it was actually built.
 

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It would have been a little dangerous to pick up my car at the faotory during the strike. It was a wildcat strike at the dealership--the strikers were walking a picket line around my car when we got there. They stood back and let my mother and me take the car with no problem. They even applauded the dealer when he put the plates on the car. That was on June 6, 1968, the build date of the car, but three days after it actually was built. In contrast, my San Jose-built fastback was built almost three weeks ahead of the scheduled build date.
 

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My FB was built almost a month earlier at the same location of yours. Would be interesting to see them next to each other.
 

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Maybe I can shed some light on "production dates." I was working for Ford in Dearborn in 1968 as a scheduling foreman. It was my responsibility to schedule vehicles into production.

Generally speaking, the plant would get a build order with an assigned "build date" from the Central Office via the plant's Sales Department. Once the order was received I could schedule it into production at anytime. Only after the unit became "48 hours" past due did it become a concern. One of my employees responsibility was to explain (daily) to Central Office why the unit was not built on schedule. Usually it was a parts availability problem. Generally speaking 80-90 percent of all orders were built prior to their build date. The "cleaner" the unit was (i.e.: 6 cylinder, minimal accessories), the greater the likelihood it would be built as soon as the order was received. I used these "clean" orders to offset the greater line times needed to build the more complicated (i.e. accessory-laden) units. The Union kept a close eye on product mix to avoid a disproportional work load being place on some employees versus others.

The 1968 strike was, a longer than needed stoppage, but I guess most strikes are like that.

Tom
 
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