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Production figures for 1968 Mustang:

Convertible: 25,376
Fastback: 42,881
Hardtop/Coupe: 249,447

That would be a ratio of about 1 : 2 : 10. I wonder how many are left and what the ratio of those left is? General attrition should affect all body styles equally but I would suspect that after some time the fastback and convertible would have been considered more desirable and would have had less relative attrition. I could be wrong about this. This could also be applied to other years as well. What do you all think?
 

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Production figures for 1968 Mustang:

Convertible: 25,376
Fastback: 42,881
Hardtop/Coupe: 249,447

That would be a ratio of about 1 : 2 : 10. I wonder how many are left and what the ratio of those left is? General attrition should affect all body styles equally but I would suspect that after some time the fastback and convertible would have been considered more desirable and would have had less relative attrition. I could be wrong about this. This could also be applied to other years as well. What do you all think?
i have a 68 coupe. Now you only 249,446 to go!
 

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Add 4 more, down to 249,443 coupes and 25,375 convertibles....

Do ones rotting in fields count, projects in a garage for years, or only drivers?

Fact is, really no way to tell how many are left...
 

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Your 68 verts are now down to 25,374...I'm doing my part. It would be extremely interesting to see the actual numbers if it were possible.

I suspect you are right that more of the fastbacks and verts have been saved as a %.
 

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Coupe and a fastback here.
 

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I would think that the rate of attrition is very different between the body styles.

I would expect convertibles to have the highest rate of attrition as, prior to Mustangs becoming collectible, they were the most prone to leaks and subsequent floorboard rust, more susceptible to structural damage due to their lack of a roof structure, and not all that popular north of the Mason-Dixon line due to climate.

I would think that coupes would be next on the list, many produced in base-model configuration as daily transportation and when the drivetrains were used up they were sent to the salvage yards and, as we all know, in the mid to late '70's yards crushed old cards by the trailer load as the value of scrap steel increased.

Last on the list are, in my opinion, the fastbacks. They were typically the cars that were higher optioned in the drivetrain department and did not make a good "family car". Sure, there were a lot that had the pi$$ run out of them but, all-in-all, they were always just a bit "special", even before they became collectible.

Just my $0.02.
 

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Make that 249,442 left to find. This one is still on the road.
 

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Totaled a 68 coupe 20 years ago, those F150s sure do hurt!
So scratch another one!
 

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You can somewhat extrapolate using the VIN's from In Search of Mustangs.

I would be surprised if 10% are left. If you want the complex formula, try this site:



http://transmidas.elementfx.com/Papers and Reports/TRR_Vol 1475_Car Scrap Rate_0795_Miaou.pdf

If is an 8 page document, with lots of math symbols, probability variables, and statistical modeling, including employment factors and economic modeling.

The short version is this:

There is a chart on page 4 that tracks the % of vehicles operational over 15 years old.

For 1990 (and this is an older article), the rate of operational is just over 9%. From 1990 backwards to 1973, the rate of decay is pretty constant, with 1974 at 2%. From 1973 back to 1965, the operational rate actually INCREASES to 3%, and then drops back down to below 2% for 1962.

We would like to think it is all Mustang, but there are Vettes, VW's, Camaro's, etc. in the muscle car era that are also boosting these numbers.

However, even if we were VERY optomistic on operational numbers, the sheer number of Mustangs produced relative to the total operational survival of all cars points us to a lower survival number.

This appears to have been some sort of a doctrinal dissertation, so the math is a little scary for some, but skip the math and read WHAT is behind the numbers, and the logic looks very sound.

This is OPERATIONAL, and we know many cars have survived, hidden away, not licensed, later dragged out of junk yards, etc., but I would guess the number of cars that are SCRAPPED and then pulled out, is relatively low.

In the late 1960's and early 70's, Mustangs were row after row in salvage yards. Even in the early 90's, there was always at least 10 in the PickaPart in Sun Valley CA, and one time there were 19 1965 1966 Blue coupes put on the line at one time, left overs from a movie shoot, many with sections cut away and rails welded in for movie cameras.
 

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I would wager that 20% or more of all GEN1 Mustang produced are sitting in barns/garages in some state of restoration. I believe another 10% or more are driven. Mustang achieved classic status immediately upon release in 64 and, with the possible exception of the late 70's (fuel shortage/boycott years), many have been babied and cherished.
 

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Don't forget the Cash for Clunkers program. This Jac&@sS program could have killed thousands of cars. These cars were not allowed to be parted out or re-sold. They crushed every one of them. If they really wanted to stimulate things, they could have let them go to the salvage yards to be parted out.
 

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Seems like each state's DMV could run a report with the appropriate filters to determine at the very least the number of Mustangs from any given year that are currently registered in their state.

Anybody have a friend in a DMV?
 

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Seems like each state's DMV could run a report...
There are, literally, hundreds here in Oz... heaps in Europe.. and "probably" other regions/countries too... its a global thing these days... :)
 

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Just came back from a local restoration shop. The owner showed me his original 68 GT 390 Fastback 4-speed he has stored in his basement. Needs restored, but I still got goosebumps when he raised the hood to show off the 427 with double 4 barrel carbs! Each carb was twice the size of my Holly 600! It used to be his Dads car and all he did was drag race it. Luckily he still has the original 390 and hopes to put it back to original one day.

68 Fastbacks = -1
 

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Don't forget the Cash for Clunkers program. This Jac&@sS program could have killed thousands of cars. These cars were not allowed to be parted out or re-sold. They crushed every one of them. If they really wanted to stimulate things, they could have let them go to the salvage yards to be parted out.
The Cash For Clunkers program did not allow any cars OLDER than 1986 models. Thus, "No vintage Mustangs were harmed in the execution of this program". And that means no 1968 Mustangs. :)

My neighbor has a very nice '68 convertible he rebuilt from salvage many years ago. Scratch another. A very nice couple in my Mustang club still drive the 1968 fastback they bought brand new. Scratch one more.
 
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