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Discussion Starter #1
Project started 20+ years ago, but has been pushed to the back burner because of regular life stuff, but now I'm retired and want to get back to work on my car.

I have two 1969 mustangs, a Mach 1 that had a very poor repair of front end damage along with lots of rust problems. The Mach 1 has a 351 Cleveland and a C4 transmission. I got a great deal in the mid 90's and drove it for a few months and it was a beast! Once I started to think about full restoration another 1969 popped up with a much better body so I figured two would provide me with lots of parts and options. The Cleveland wasn't available in 1969, so it is obviously from a later car. This is my donor car. It has been completely stripped and I have all the parts.

My project car is a 1969 Sportsroof with a 200 engine and the 3 speed manual transmission. Plain Jane, but the body is is good shape and been garaged for the last 25 years. Not much power but the old 200 runs like a champ.

My original thought was to swap out the 200 for the 351, but that will wait a bit longer. In preparation for the engine swap, I swapped out the front and rear suspension about 10 years ago and it has been parked ever since. I've got the engine/transmission back up and running, but I'm having problems with the brakes. After I did the swap 10 years ago, the brake pedal was much lower and will go all the way to the floor. The car will stop, but not very quickly (not safe at al) and it won't lock the wheels. The pressure to apply brakes is way less, so the booster is working. Brake fluid has been replaced and brakes have been bled.

The old brakes were drum and manual. The current brakes are disk/drum and power. All parts bolted up nicely, since they came from the same model car. The difference is the manual brake pedal instead of the automatic. I don't remember which pushrod I used, but hopefully I can find the other one in basement.

Is this simply a matter of getting a longer brake pushrod? Any other suggestions on what could be the problem?

Thanks!
 

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68 Mustang Coupe
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IIRC the pedals are different between power brakes and manual brakes. Compare your pedal to the ones on this page.

 

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Sounds very much like you have the wrong pedal in rather than the wrong push rods. Scott is pretty much on the money in my opinion. PB needs match pedal it goes into the upper position in the pedal support
 

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Discussion Starter #4
IIRC the pedals are different between power brakes and manual brakes. Compare your pedal to the ones on this page.

Wow, thanks for the quick reply!

So, it appears that all I need to do is grab the automatic power break pedal, cut the foot pad down to the manual pad size and put it into the upper position on the support. I'll get some new bushings for the brake and clutch pedals while I'm at it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Sounds very much like you have the wrong pedal in rather than the wrong push rods. Scott is pretty much on the money in my opinion. PB needs match pedal it goes into the upper position in the pedal support
Thanks for that extra hint. I've tried to see if my support has that extra hole up top, but I can't even see the top of it. Looks like it is a pretty tough job to get the pedals off without removing lots of other things. Most Youtube videos show the process after much of the dash is apart.

Has anyone removed the pedals? Is it easier to remove the booster/master cylinder and then remove the whole support bracket with pedals intact, or were you able to remove the pedal from the inside without taking out the steering column ect...?
 

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I’ve done it both ways, removed the pedal itself and the whole support. If you have the factory assist spring setup still intact or there it will probably be easier to remove the assembly and deal with it on a bench. If you don’t have that setup (it’s a big sping that’s more like a valve spring attached At the top of the clutch pedal, way up in there with about enough room for one hand.). If it’s not there it will be easier to just replace the brake pedal. The clutch oedal will need to be removed to get the manual brake pedal out in either case.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Spring is there, so it looks like I need to pull the support. I have to go to the storage unit to pull off the power brake pedal from the donor car, so I'll grab the support at the same time to see which is better. Everything has been removed from that car so it should be easy enough.

I plan on pulling the seat (no telling what I'll find under a seat that hasn't been removed in 30+ years). Do I need to remove the steering column? What about the instrument panel?
 

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Steering column yes, instrumental panel, not sure.
 

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You can leave the instrument cluster, but you will probably find it easier with the dash off.....
steering column will have to be dropped at the very least, I just pull it to give more room. It’s just one of those time consuming jobs, not difficult just several pieces to the puzzle.
 

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I use a Z-wrench through the cluster hole in my 67. Super easy that way.
 

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67 is different, the 69/70 has a bracket bolted on up top for the assist spring. With the spring installed it’s kinda in the way of the bracket bolts.....and it’s not like the 67 spring, it’s like a valve spring rather than a pull spring. Much easier on the 67.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
It was a rainy day, so a good day to work in the garage. Some progress so far. I removed the drivers seat and found a brand new set of door and trunk locks complete with new keys under the seat! Pleasantly surprised at the lack of rust on the floor panels. There is surface rust up under the dash, but under the seat is very clean. Plugs in place and no rust on the bolts. The hint to use a cardboard tube came in handy here to keep the nuts from falling between the upper and lower sheetmetal under the seat. Then came the dash. Side plastics, two screws on each corner, three under each hump and three right under the windshield and it came right out. Should have been two near the radio, but there isn't a radio or radio cover in this car. The dash had been pulled by PO and covered with some kind of plastic fitted cover. I was wondering why is was in such good condition with no cracks. Instrument panel was easy enough to pull next because it is only held on with 4 screws, the wiring connector and the speedo cable. There is an aftermarket tach installed in the far left instrument position. Not sure what was originally there.

Next was the steering column. I removed the two nuts from the flex connector on the steering box, the four bolts on the firewall and four bolts facing the floor under the dash, connected to the brake support. The steering column wiggled, but wouldn't come out. Laying down and staring up into the dash, there is one more bolt sideways facing the drivers door right by the other four bolts connected to the brake support. I didn't see this in the Chilton's manual! Then I disconnected the wiring connector for horn/turn signal. After a good tug and some careful maneuvering around all the aftermarket wires, most of the steering column pulled out. There is a rod that connects to the flexible (rag?) joint and slides up into the rest of the column. Perhaps I could have left that rod connected to the flex joint, but it will probably be easier to pull the pedal bracket without it in the car.

Now I have to get out to the storage unit to pull the power brake pedal and support from the donor car. That will have to wait until Friday or Sat.

Of course now that I have the steering column and dash out and apart, I'll have to rebuild what is necessary there too. That is the problem with removing assemblies to get to other stuff. It is out, so might as well restore that too!

Thanks for all your help so far. Pulling the dash and column was not as bad as I thought it would be.
 

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It was a rainy day, so a good day to work in the garage. Some progress so far. I removed the drivers seat and found a brand new set of door and trunk locks complete with new keys under the seat! Pleasantly surprised at the lack of rust on the floor panels. There is surface rust up under the dash, but under the seat is very clean. Plugs in place and no rust on the bolts. The hint to use a cardboard tube came in handy here to keep the nuts from falling between the upper and lower sheetmetal under the seat. Then came the dash. Side plastics, two screws on each corner, three under each hump and three right under the windshield and it came right out. Should have been two near the radio, but there isn't a radio or radio cover in this car. The dash had been pulled by PO and covered with some kind of plastic fitted cover. I was wondering why is was in such good condition with no cracks. Instrument panel was easy enough to pull next because it is only held on with 4 screws, the wiring connector and the speedo cable. There is an aftermarket tach installed in the far left instrument position. Not sure what was originally there.

Next was the steering column. I removed the two nuts from the flex connector on the steering box, the four bolts on the firewall and four bolts facing the floor under the dash, connected to the brake support. The steering column wiggled, but wouldn't come out. Laying down and staring up into the dash, there is one more bolt sideways facing the drivers door right by the other four bolts connected to the brake support. I didn't see this in the Chilton's manual! Then I disconnected the wiring connector for horn/turn signal. After a good tug and some careful maneuvering around all the aftermarket wires, most of the steering column pulled out. There is a rod that connects to the flexible (rag?) joint and slides up into the rest of the column. Perhaps I could have left that rod connected to the flex joint, but it will probably be easier to pull the pedal bracket without it in the car.

Now I have to get out to the storage unit to pull the power brake pedal and support from the donor car. That will have to wait until Friday or Sat.

Of course now that I have the steering column and dash out and apart, I'll have to rebuild what is necessary there too. That is the problem with removing assemblies to get to other stuff. It is out, so might as well restore that too!

Thanks for all your help so far. Pulling the dash and column was not as bad as I thought it would be.
Communik8r, reading your post made me think of something I saw in this video from WCCC
At about the 15’ mark he talks about collapsible steering columns with broken plastic pins and causing slop and the 2 shafts sliding off one another - I realize the video deals w/ Cougars but they do share a bunch of parts w/ the Mustangs.
Hope someone more knowledgeable than I can confirm or disprove the applicability to your car.
Good luck and enjoy the process.

Mike
 
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