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Wow, just wow! Outstanding work
And to think I was fretting a few rust repairs on my 69.
 

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1969 Mustang Mach 1
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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
So much beautiful work done so well. You must have quite a bit of metal fab equipment to make all the patch parts. You certainly won't have to worry about the integrity of the car after you are done.
Wow, just wow! Outstanding work
And to think I was fretting a few rust repairs on my 69.
Thank you guys. Honestly I don't have much. I have my 110V welder, an angle grinder, and for bending/forming just scrap tubing, clamps, vice grips, and mallets. I'd love to expand to more metal forming tools, but space/hobby budget limited there. Between the repairs and additional structural changes, I definitely hope to never have to worry about the integrity!

Any rust repair is understandably nerve racking. I think it just lost it's sting after realizing the entire car would need it.
 
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1966 C Code Coupe / 1970 Mach 1 351C
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Very impressive! As a fellow mechanical engineer, I would have liked to tackle something like this (well maybe not this rusty :) ), but probably too old now to do what you are doing. I am sure I could think of a few other excuses as well, but anyway I am amazed at what you have done. I was able to get my car with most of the metal work completed. Definitely will be following!
 

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1969 Mustang Mach 1
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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
Very impressive! As a fellow mechanical engineer, I would have liked to tackle something like this (well maybe not this rusty :) ), but probably too old now to do what you are doing. I am sure I could think of a few other excuses as well, but anyway I am amazed at what you have done. I was able to get my car with most of the metal work completed. Definitely will be following!
Thank you! I definitely would not recommend starting with something this rusty lol. Part of me is glad to have to had to do all the metal work, but it's definitely taken it's toll time wise. Glad to hear you were able to get one with metal work done! that just leaves all the fun part install steps!
 
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Thank you guys. Honestly I don't have much. I have my 110V welder, an angle grinder, and for bending/forming just scrap tubing, clamps, vice grips, and mallets. I'd love to expand to more metal forming tools, but space/hobby budget limited there. Between the repairs and additional structural changes, I definitely hope to never have to worry about the integrity!

Any rust repair is understandably nerve racking. I think it just lost it's sting after realizing the entire car would need it.
Well,
That just makes it that much more more impressive. A true testament to your ingenuity and abilities!
👍
 

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1969 Mustang Mach 1
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Discussion Starter · #46 ·
Well,
That just makes it that much more more impressive. A true testament to your ingenuity and abilities!
👍
That means a lot! Thankfully it's something that I have fun doing (most of the time at least), so it makes the process easier and definitely rewarding when all said and done.
 
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It truly does make the process easier and definitely rewarding when all is said and done. I enjoyed the process so much my brothers and kids thought I was making up new fab projects just to keep working on my 69. There might be some truth to that, as I thought if I was going to do a mod, right then was the time to do it. But once you start driving it, the number of compliments and thumbs up from people will astound you. You'll wish you were driving it sooner.
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
It truly does make the process easier and definitely rewarding when all is said and done. I enjoyed the process so much my brothers and kids thought I was making up new fab projects just to keep working on my 69. There might be some truth to that, as I thought if I was going to do a mod, right then was the time to do it. But once you start driving it, the number of compliments and thumbs up from people will astound you. You'll wish you were driving it sooner.
I absolutely make up new fab idea and projects as I go, so I can relate there if they were on to you! That's the same approach I have, so a lot of things are changing now, some small and some larger, but I wanted to get them all done in metal phase if they needed metal work. I'm looking forward to the driving part! Probably still a ways out. My goal was to have it road worthy by 30, but that's coming up real fast and I'm a long way from having a partial car on my homemade skateboard...
 

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1969 Mustang Mach 1
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Discussion Starter · #49 ·
Metal Fabrication/Replacement:

After the brief excitement of new parts, it was back to metal work. I ended up getting a new core support. Of all the panels I replaced, this one was the one that needed it the least, but it did have some damage in areas where panels welded up, so rather than cut and replace all of those spots, I figured it was easier and a better use of time to just replace it.
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New Part Install:

After the core support, I had a hard time just looking at that 3 link sit around in boxes, so I decided to work on installing some of the parts that required the cutting/welding/drilling. I started with the lower torque box plates and trailing arm mounting tabs.
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On my way to install the third link clearance box in the floor, I found more rust, of course. So first things first, I made another patch panel underneath the car. The before picture doesn’t look bad, but I can assure you, there was quite a bit of rust behind that small panel.
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As you can see from the previous picture, I also used that same time to install the third link attachment bar. I followed Shaun’s instructions for this cross bar and for the Watt’s link supporting structure that use shoulder bolts and the frame rail for mounting. As the spacing between the bars is designed for OEM frame rail installation, I was super happy to get the bars installed almost dead on after having replaced both frame rails. Some light massaging was needed, but given the factory’s tolerances back in the 60’s, I’d say I matched the variance that came off the assembly line.
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Next it was time to install the clearance box for the 3 link in the trunk floor. I marked the area as outlined in the instructions and grabbed my favorite power tool and made some room.
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Discussion Starter · #50 ·
New Part Install:

After these few items, it was time for my first bolt in PART INSTALL! I mocked up all of the SoT goodies to make sure I had things installed correctly and square in the car, at least with basic measurements.
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Just seeing the parts in the boxes was a thrill, let alone on the car a few short weeks later! As part of my checks, I cut out a simulated wheel diameter to make sure the rear end had clearance in the wheel well. It also helped visually confirm I had the rear end square in the rear quarter panels. It looks a bit goofy, but it was a nice visual confirmation for the feel good meter if nothing else.
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Metal Fabrication/Replacement:

A lot of this install was also to prep for the replacement of the full rear quarter panels. Both sides needed it, but I started on the passenger side. Before doing anything to the panel. I rehung the doors, front fenders, and trunk. I measured and documented all of the gaps so I at least knew what I started with, knowing they will need some tweaks in the final stages of metal work as well. With all things documented, I started drilling and hammering out all the spot welds.
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Removing the quarter allowed me access to many smaller spots that needed attention; whether that be panel replacement or patch panels. The quarter panel extension was all rusted, the outer wheel house was crap, and the worst section was the inner structure near the lead seam. I haven’t highlighted this area yet, but that was the most nerve racking area of rust I knew about from the get go. I bought it knowing there was a hole in that area from mice, what I didn’t know at the time was how much damage happened underneath before coming through the roof at the joint.
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Discussion Starter · #51 ·
Metal Fabrication/Replacement:

I marked the section of roof that would need replaced and cut it out.
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This level of rust meant I needed to open up the inner structure and do multiple layers of patches. Before cutting anymore, I re-braced the area to make sure that I didn’t collapse the roof during these repairs. I got close once, but everything was braced well enough that my oopsie didn’t ruin everything. To get to the inner most later, I removed sections of inner structure panels and then marked the bad areas and cut/drilled it out. I then used my poster board to replicate and make my patch.
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First patch done. Was it perfect? Nope. Was it structural? I sure hope so! Next panel was one that was removed to fix this section. The panel houses the shoulder belt nut, and that area was pretty rusty too. I wanted to fix that just in case that bolt was needed for a shoulder belt given future modifications.
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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
Metal Fabrication/Replacement:

Another one that wasn’t super pretty, but it should be a lot more structurally sound than rust. I had to next cut out more of the inner most structure to get to the next area of rust between the inner later and the roof/quarter panel.
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For a second, I contemplated leaving this as a window, considering the size……
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Yet again, another patch that is functional, but not necessarily the exact shape of the outgoing metal. This is the result, I believe, of not having the experience, skills, or correct tools to form the more complex shapes that a master of the trade or a massive mass production press and die does. But, ugly and all, the structure in that area was now fixed, which meant I could continue working towards hanging the new quarter, but first I had to install the new outer wheel house.
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Discussion Starter · #53 ·
Metal Fabrication/Replacement:

I had mentioned earlier there were a lot of small pieces that needed repaired behind the quarters, the tail light panel was one of them that I didn’t expect. Someone did some repair work that consisted of meh metal work and better body filler work. I wanted to fix it with metal.
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I have to say, this was one of the patches I was most proud of. It still needs some clean up and some areas smoothed with something other than a flapper disk on my angle grinder, but I was thrilled with it for now. Another small patch needed was in the door striker panel? (not sure what it’s technical name is) This area was another poor repair previously, so I made a new panel to match up with the new quarter.
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If you think we’re done with small patches, you’re wrong. Next one was in the wheel house to close up the remainder of what I repaired on the inner wheel house.
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Discussion Starter · #54 ·
Metal Fabrication/Replacement:

NOW it was time to hang the new quarter. I mocked it in before drilling rosette weld holes just in case something needed fixed or massaged, but the fit seemed really good! With that going well, I tacked it in.
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One of my previous patches on the rocker didn’t totally match up, so I made a quick fix to it to make the lines blend correctly.
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Next up was the most daunting patch to date; the roof to quarter panel patch. I decided to do away with the lead joint for multiple reasons, and a big one was the rust that was there. I would need to make a panel regardless, so I made a panel to bridge the gap from the quarter panel to the roof. I approached this the same way I’ve done all of them so far, poster board to metal.
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I’ve mentioned before my limited tools, I took this next picture to show what I used to make the following bends/shapes to match the contour I could see. Only tools not pictured were my knee that I made some of the curvature over and hands….
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Discussion Starter · #55 ·
Metal Fabrication/Replacement:
Tacking in the quarter panel to roof patch.
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I finished the welding after a brief period of freaking out as this was the first panel that would be a super visible piece. It didn’t come out perfect, but I think a small amount of filler and sanding will hide the small imperfections. Having never done body work, I was really happy with the end result.
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You can definitely see some low spots still, but I was a little liberal with the flapper wheel in areas and didn’t blend the lower seam well enough with weld, both things should be easy to fix later with body work. The primer and grinding lines don’t show well in photos, skewing the light a bit and making it look rougher than it is, but the contour matches pretty close!
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And the hits (rust spots) just keep coming. I give you a lot of credit to be able to tackle each and every challenge that car gives you.
After watching all the rust you have found and the work you have done to repair the car, just where did this car spend most of its life? The car had to have been in a wet environment for a very long time for the rust to get to the spaces higher up in the body. Its like the car sat in a swampy field or something?
You are giving the car a new lease on life, I just hope it rewards you with many years of enjoyment after all the hard work is done.
 

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Welp, at least you have a sense of humor thru all this...stuff. And dude, go easy on yourself, your fab work is better than most, and quite acceptable. At least to me.

Notwithstanding your lack of fab tools, flapper wheels are great, but their high speed can remove material in a hurry. Pneumatic grinder/sanders are nice because you can regulate the disc speed. If you'reusing a flap disc on a 4 inch grinder, you can hit the trigger once and let the speed reduce to a workable level.
 

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Discussion Starter · #58 ·
And the hits (rust spots) just keep coming. I give you a lot of credit to be able to tackle each and every challenge that car gives you.
After watching all the rust you have found and the work you have done to repair the car, just where did this car spend most of its life? The car had to have been in a wet environment for a very long time for the rust to get to the spaces higher up in the body. Its like the car sat in a swampy field or something?
You are giving the car a new lease on life, I just hope it rewards you with many years of enjoyment after all the hard work is done.
And I can promise I have a lot more updates to show this car isn't quite done yet haha! I believe the car stayed in the northeast most of its life. I picked it up in new Jersey and the seller shared it was a "barn find" locally. The high end rust seemed to mainly come from the massive mouse complex in that corner, but I'm sure the overall moisture in the air didn't help it. I sure hope it provides that to me and my family when I'm done!
Welp, at least you have a sense of humor thru all this...stuff. And dude, go easy on yourself, your fab work is better than most, and quite acceptable. At least to me.

Notwithstanding your lack of fab tools, flapper wheels are great, but their high speed can remove material in a hurry. Pneumatic grinder/sanders are nice because you can regulate the disc speed. If you'reusing a flap disc on a 4 inch grinder, you can hit the trigger once and let the speed reduce to a workable level.
I've been having a lot of fun with it and it's something I'm able to share with my family and close friends, so it definitely makes it easy to be light hearted with it. I appreciate that! There is always room for learning and improvement, so that's where my comments on my work are. I definitely feel good about it overall, but I know I could get better and do better with practice. I've not considered moving to a pneumatic sander, I think that might be a good way to go for body work! That's also a good idea for the flapper disk. Next time I'm in the garage I'll give that a shot and get some practice in!
 
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Discussion Starter · #60 ·
Awesome work! That is a massive amount of metal work! Bravo!
Curious what front and rear spring rate you will be running? Rear looks like a 375(?).
Thank you! Oh good question. Off hand, (currently in a hotel away on work) I cannot remember what I was supplied with. But chances are I'll change rates once the car can be weighed, motion ratios can be determined (I think SoT rear is 1:1, but front is another custom set-up that I'll need to measure) and ride frequency can be calculated and a target can be met. I still need to set those targets, but it's a good ways out still.
 
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