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Discussion Starter · #221 ·
Love this build. I have a 70 fastback that ive owned since 97 and I'm slowly getting back at it and this build is right up my alley. My car has an art Morrison chassis under but most of the rest is close. I'm planning on twin turbo coyote and a t56 magnum. I have everything and unfortunately my chasis was buikt before coyote engines were built so we are fabbing up mounts now. The one piece I need is the booster setup. Your hydratech looks great, called today and they are no longer taking orders cause they are so far behind. That wedge may be the way to go. Tried to find him on ebay but no luck. Those headers turn out good for you? Jimmy is a good friend and they do great work. Looking forward to following this build and bouncing some of my car off of you
IMO, your build is at the next level up from mine. The Art Morrison chassis and twin turbos goes well beyond what I have done.
I bought a wedge, then went with the Hydratech HB system and sold the wedge.
I think Ultimate Headers did a good job. The only annoyance will be the installation. Only about half of the header bolts will be accessible straight on, so a lot of work with a wrench from the side. Not ideal, but I am sure the installation will go fine. I will install the headers on the engine outside of the car making their install much easier. Since I was one of the test subjects in working out the latest design, I did not have them coated. I wish I had coated them by UH when they were there. The locals want a fortune to ceramic coat these headers.

For the HB wedge, here is the contact info I used. Email him and see if he is still making them, just ask to mill it for the 2003 Ford HB. I bought mine in 2018 and it was $287 then, hate to think was it will cost now.

Christopher Robinson [email protected]
 

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I think Ultimate Headers did a good job. The only annoyance will be the installation. Only about half of the header bolts will be accessible straight on, so a lot of work with a wrench from the side. Not ideal, but I am sure the installation will go fine. I will install the headers on the engine outside of the car making their install much easier. Since I was one of the test subjects in working out the latest design, I did not have them coated.
We've already discussed the knuckle busting time I had bolting the headers on but here is another thing to watch for. When mine finally slid into place without touch the frame and floor, I was so excited I neglected to make sure how much room they had. On my particular install, the top tube was very, very close to the floorboard on the passenger side. Just for about 1/2 an inch where the toe board curved into the floor board. I couldn't slip a piece of cardboard in. It bugged me for a few days until I finally loosened the motor mounts and moved engine forward enough to get MAP torch and hammer down there and flatten that area of header tube. Very slight but I ended up with enough space to make me feel better about it. May not be a concern to you with your setup but I was glad I didn't have them coated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #224 ·
We've already discussed the knuckle busting time I had bolting the headers on but here is another thing to watch for. When mine finally slid into place without touch the frame and floor, I was so excited I neglected to make sure how much room they had. On my particular install, the top tube was very, very close to the floorboard on the passenger side. Just for about 1/2 an inch where the toe board curved into the floor board. I couldn't slip a piece of cardboard in. It bugged me for a few days until I finally loosened the motor mounts and moved engine forward enough to get MAP torch and hammer down there and flatten that area of header tube. Very slight but I ended up with enough space to make me feel better about it. May not be a concern to you with your setup but I was glad I didn't have them coated.
Just to be sure, this was with the 471071 headers correct? I know the 65 to 70 models are all called 1st Gen, but the more I read I realize it is more like 1A 65-66, 1B 67-68, 1C 69-70, and 1D for 71-73. I am guessing my 70 model has more room in the lower FW area or the position of the engine dictated by your front suspension crossmember has placed the engine closer to the firewall than did my TCP front clip.
I have no issues with the headers getting too close to the lower firewall panel/front floor. The only clearance issues I am concerned with are contact with a boss on the DS side of the block and near zero clearance to the starter motor. I currently do not have the header gaskets in place which will help a bit. The boss on the DS side of the block will be cut and ground down. This will be done the next time the engine comes out. I have thermal insulation to go on the starter and will adjust the offending header tube if necessary.
 

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Just to be sure, this was with the 471071 headers correct? I know the 65 to 70 models are all called 1st Gen, but the more I read I realize it is more like 1A 65-66, 1B 67-68, 1C 69-70, and 1D for 71-73. I am guessing my 70 model has more room in the lower FW area or the position of the engine dictated by your front suspension crossmember has placed the engine closer to the firewall than did my TCP front clip.
I have no issues with the headers getting too close to the lower firewall panel/front floor. The only clearance issues I am concerned with are contact with a boss on the DS side of the block and near zero clearance to the starter motor. I currently do not have the header gaskets in place which will help a bit. The boss on the DS side of the block will be cut and ground down. This will be done the next time the engine comes out. I have thermal insulation to go on the starter and will adjust the offending header tube if necessary.
Yep, 471071 headers. No complaints on their fit. As you state, just the placement of my engine so close to the firewall combined with smaller size of engine bay is source of that minor issue.
 

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I often wonder with the number of threads regarding Coyote swaps and the different “IFS/front frame-crossmember options, if a specific thread discussing each option and lessons learned could be beneficial etc.? Could include topics like what worked for said year Stang, specific metal work and or required mods, associated running gear and parts etc. Maybe a specific thread for each IFS/kit-system (and rear?).

Boss50 - I had to “massage” that DS lug on the block as well for the Heidts headers. That was the only “clearance” issue I ran into. And like Huntingky mentioned, I also have 2-3 bolts that are less than fun to get to - even with the engine out.. You can relatively easily get the Heidts headers in and out with the engine installed (engine mount bolts in) however, getting at all the header bolts would most likely have you just pulling the Coyote... 😬
-I need bandaids for my knuckles just for thinking about it...
 

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Discussion Starter · #227 ·
A comprehensive "sticky" with the pros/cons for details of each Coyote swap chassis option would be a great resource for those attempting the swap in the future. I am fully willing to contribute what I have been through with the Total Control Products solution.
As mentioned, adding details of the rear suspension options would help too. Other topics to consider would be subframe connectors, fuel tank/pump, radiator, PS booster, wire harness, and on and on.
Maybe the moderators will buy in let us have a dedicated sub-thread.
 

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A comprehensive "sticky" with the pros/cons for details of each Coyote swap chassis option would be a great resource for those attempting the swap in the future. I am fully willing to contribute what I have been through with the Total Control Products solution.
As mentioned, adding details of the rear suspension options would help too. Other topics to consider would be subframe connectors, fuel tank/pump, radiator, PS booster, wire harness, and on and on.
Maybe the moderators will buy in let us have a dedicated sub-thread.
As someone researching the beginning stages of this and about to pull the trigger on an IFS kit front and rear, I would be extremely interested in this. I am leaning hard towards the TCI Stage 2 kit, notched and ready for Coyote but leaving my 289 and C4 in my car with this configuration while I tape my piggy bank back together and refill it until I can do the Coyote and TKX or Magnum or whatever I desire.
A dedicated sub-thread discussing challenges and opportunities with each IFS/rear end as well as all the other items you mentioned would make researching options for a build hecka easier. I've called TCI and MTF often enough that I am sure they want me to spend my money or leave them alone!
 

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Discussion Starter · #229 ·
Finally time to post a few pictures of my latest effort. I am using the 6R80 6 speed AT in my build. It requires a transmission cooler as in the Mustang GT application. I contacted Ford Performance a few months back and they recommended the AT cooler used on the Mustang GT. I researched the recommendation and found the cooler to be inexpensive and had the benefit of having both the inlet on outlet on the same side of the cooler. The only down side was its size and the connections are 1/2" hose barb.
Once the trans cooler arrived, I had to look for a location where it would interfere with the least number of things. I decided on mounting under the front valence/grill support. I wanted to mount it up higher than the stock support would allow, so I modified it quite a bit.

Once the cooler was mounted, I tried using 90 AN -8 fittings to go under the front frame crossmember. However looking at a friends Mach 1, it was noted that this approach would hit the back of the front valance, so a new plan was needed. I decided on notching the front frame crossmember to gain room for the hoses. This also required changing from a 90 degree to a straight fitting.
The transition from the hose barb fittings on the cooler to AN fittings required the use of Gates Transmission Cooler Hose I found on Amazon. Heater hose will not stand up to AT fluid, Gates had the solution. When all done, the Gates hose will be secured using the Gate shrink type hose clamps.







The hoses were routed and clamped as they worked toward the connections on the 6R80. Power by the Hour provided the hose fitting for the 6R80 to switch to AN -8 fittings. The adapter is a nice piece, just expensive. It permits the 2 male AN fittings to be rotated about 180 degrees allowing you to angle them in just about any direction needed.



This effort is mostly done, just painting of the one bracket is needed. This will be done with a number of other brackets made for other functions.
Two more efforts to be done, initial routing of the AAW harness for the front lighting and routing the 1 AWG starter cable at the front. I need to figure out how to clear a path for the cable into the fresh air vent area and then into the torque box to exit at the front. As I figure this one out I will post more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #231 ·
Worked on routing the positive battery cables. I have my battery located in the trunk as the space is used up front by my custom coolant recovery tank. With the battery in the trunk I really did not want to run the cables under the car. I found that the sill channel is just large enough to hold my 1 AWG positive starter cable, 6 AWG cable for the Coyote power distribution box and AAW fuse box, and the single wire for the sail panel light. There was only one obstacle and that was a bulkhead between the sill channel and the cowl vent plenum. It is very fortunate that my top cowl panels are not welded in at the moment. This gave me access to the cowl vent plenum from above and through the interior vent opening. I had to drill 3/4 and 1/2 inch holes for the cable grommets in the bulkhead. Not much room to work in the plenum. It was a real PITA, but I was able to drill pilot holes and open them up to size. I don't know if it is possible to do this going in from the grill opening alone. So the time to do this is when the car is apart.
Here are the 1 and 6 AWG cables laying side by side in the sill channel.

Here is where the cables go through the bulkhead.

Here are the cables in the cowl vent plenum looking down from above.

Stater cable is routed out of the cowl vent plenum through the large drain hole already present. The cable will be covered with split loom when done.

Stater cable routes under subframe directly to the starter terminal.

Cables route over PS wheel house to where I installed my battery hold down bracket. I found a perfect sized box that I use to simulate the battery.


A wiring panel will be made to sit next to the battery. It will have a 250A mega fuse for the 1 AWG starter cable and a 100A mega fuse for the 6 AWG cable feeding the rest of the car. A battery disconnect switch will also be part of the wiring panel. A Odyssey ODP-AGM75 86 battery will be used to power the car.
Since I have full length subframe connectors that are welded to the floor, I do not plan to run a ground cable the full length of the car. I will run a 1 AWG ground from the battery through the trunk floor and tie to the rear frame rail. A 1 AWG will be run from the engine block to the front subframe to complete the ground path.
 

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Discussion Starter · #232 ·
Made more progress on rear mounted battery, fuse panel, and cutoff switch. The battery tray shown is a 70 Mustang battery tray, but it is rotated 180 degrees for mounting on the edge of the rear fender well. I have modified it by welding on square 3/8-16 nuts to anchor it in four places.
The rear fuse/cutoff switch panel uses a Summit cutoff switch and two Bussmann mega fuse holders. One fuse holder has a 250A fuse for the 1 AWG feed to the starter. The secondary fuse is a 100A 6 AWG cable for the coyote controls pack power distribution module and the AAW fuse panel.
The battery is an Odyssey ODP-AGM75/86. This battery is larger in capacity than what Ford calls out for the Mustang GT and it is a bit smaller than a Group 24 battery the tray was made for.
All that is needed now is to paint the tray, finalize the assembly HW for the fuse panel, and cut and terminate the cables. The cables will not be finalized until the body is painted as the grommets fit tight to the cable and will not allow lugs and shrink sleeving to pass through.
This is the last of the battery cable wire planning.




 

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Discussion Starter · #233 ·
Here is my solution for the upper radiator hose.
The hose supplied with the Coyote Controls Pack has the necessary female fitting for the thermostat housing on the Coyote. Unfortunately, the hose has an awful bend in it that makes routing it to the upper hose bib on the radiator difficult at best. Fortunately Power by the Hour comes to the rescue with their ACC-1073 Upper Radiator Hose Adapter for the Coyote.
The PBH upper radiator hose adapter allows you connect the 1.5" hose of your choice, no more restrictions to the OEM hose and its clocked position.

Upper hose bib without the adapter

Upper hose bid with PBH adapter installed

Finally with the Gates 22791 1.5 inch hose cut down and installed


The Gates hose is not relaxed as I had to twist it a bit to eliminate the beginning of hose collapse. I may look for a hose with a better fit or install SS hose springs inside to prevent hose collapse once the engine is up and running.
 

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Discussion Starter · #235 · (Edited)
Man! Those engines are awful snuggly in there! EVERYTHING looks tight!
Yes sir, you know the story 10 lbs of stuff in a 5 lb bag. I guess I like a challenge, nothing else to say. At least there is more room in there than a 69/70 B9.
 

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Discussion Starter · #236 ·
I added an inertia switch to my battery feed fuse panel. I needed to find a location for the switch and there was just enough room for it on the fuse panel. For those not familiar with a inertia switch, they will open the power feed to the EFI fuel pump in the event of a roll over accident. I have a 340 lph in tank pump for the Coyote, something I would not want to have running should the car get rolled.

 

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Discussion Starter · #237 ·
Here are pictures of the cold air intake I have added. I worked with Guy Smith at Spectre Performance to put together components that would fit and look the way I wanted to. As usual my solution was not a cheap way to go, but got what I wanted. A note, Spectre Performance is a K&N company.
The intake tube is from a kit designed for the Mustang GT. About the only thing I was able to use was the intake tube. I went that route as I do not have anyone local that I would trust to do good aluminum tig welding. The intake tube has all the connections for the Coyote vacuum line and crankcase ventilation. A shorter 3.5 inch coupler was selected at the throttle body. I opted for a black HPR9617K air filter with a SPR-990003 MAF sleeve. The MAF sleeve adapts the 4" filter intake to the 3.5 inch intake tube. I choose the 9617 filter to maximize filter area and fill the space between the end of the intake tube and the inner fender apron.

[email protected]




And a photo of the custom coolant tank I made to fit the available space. Volume is just under 4 qts, just a bit less than the 4 litres the OEM tank holds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #238 · (Edited)
With the addition of the cold air intake components, I have now worked out a solution for everything that goes in the engine compartment.
I did fail to mention that I added a reproduction Ford windshield washer reservoir bag. I was looking for a solution, but the generic hard plastic parts looked terrible and their shape was not compatible with the space left over in the DS corner next to the radiator. The Ford bag conforms to the space when filled eliminating the need to make something fit. I am waiting on the mounting bracket for the WS washer bag as is back ordered till September. I bought a Delco generic/replacement windshield washer pump. The WS pump will be mounted to the outside of the fender apron to keep clutter to a minimum.

I am now approaching the point where the engine and trans will come out again and the body will be stripped to little more than a shell. I will first do all the sheet metal related welding that remains including the cowl lower and upper panels, unnecessary holes in the engine compartment, firewall patch, transmission cover patch, and last the replacement tail light panel. Once these welding tasks are complete, it is time to start the final floor and body preparation.

The plan is to get the car on a rotisserie in the Spring with epoxy, body putty, and high build primer in the fall. Color in the Spring of 2023 and first show in October.
 

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Made more progress on rear mounted battery, fuse panel, and cutoff switch. The battery tray shown is a 70 Mustang battery tray, but it is rotated 180 degrees for mounting on the edge of the rear fender well. I have modified it by welding on square 3/8-16 nuts to anchor it in four places.
The rear fuse/cutoff switch panel uses a Summit cutoff switch and two Bussmann mega fuse holders. One fuse holder has a 250A fuse for the 1 AWG feed to the starter. The secondary fuse is a 100A 6 AWG cable for the coyote controls pack power distribution module and the AAW fuse panel.
The battery is an Odyssey ODP-AGM75/86. This battery is larger in capacity than what Ford calls out for the Mustang GT and it is a bit smaller than a Group 24 battery the tray was made for.
All that is needed now is to paint the tray, finalize the assembly HW for the fuse panel, and cut and terminate the cables. The cables will not be finalized until the body is painted as the grommets fit tight to the cable and will not allow lugs and shrink sleeving to pass through.
This is the last of the battery cable wire planning.




Just read all 12 pages. Amazing build!

Mine isn't near as radical as yours, but your idea of using the battery tray is sheer genius! I've got my Odessy installed on the trunk floor, but I want to move it closer to the fender so I can fit a trunk kit. Ive been noodling on how I was going to mount it. Now I know. Thanks for doing such an amazing job documenting what you've learned.
 

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Discussion Starter · #240 ·
Just read all 12 pages. Amazing build!

Mine isn't near as radical as yours, but your idea of using the battery tray is sheer genius! I've got my Odessy installed on the trunk floor, but I want to move it closer to the fender so I can fit a trunk kit. Ive been noodling on how I was going to mount it. Now I know. Thanks for doing such an amazing job documenting what you've learned.
Thanks, biggest undertaking of my life. I searched to see if you had a build thread and found a post from 2017 that you were back. The car looks great, but need more details. Hopefully you will get back to posting on the car.
 
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