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67 vert, 347 EFI, T5
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Thanks, biggest undertaking of my life. I searched to see if you had a build thread and found a post from 2017 that you were back. The car looks great, but need more details. Hopefully you will get back to posting on the car.
Yeah, I'm one of those guys that never starts a build thread. 🙄

And I've been back at 4 least times. I started on my project in 2003. Barn find 67 vert for my then-15-year-old son. He gave up on it after 2 years and the first cross-country move. I declared it mine and decided I was going to build a restomod. I needed a motor, and found a donor 91 LX. Back then Ford Racing didn't make swap kits, so you had to pull the harness if you wanted to run EFI. It had been done, but was not a common thing, and the vendors hadn't caught on yet.

I moved the car with the new motor and T5 installed, but not running, from WA to AK in 2006. Then I moved the roller again from AK to FL in 2013. Then I swapped bodies in Jan 14 (long story involving bondo'ed frame rails and a deceptive body shop). That led to a reality-TV-show build to try to get the car ready for the 50th (I could have sworn there was a thread on here from that time) that came up just short, so we did Charlotte in my 2013 GT500.

The car got delayed again by a house remodel, so it wasn't done before the move from FL back to WA in 2016. The 2017 "back again" was short-lived--work keeps getting in the way. But THIS TIME I'm really going to finish it!!! 😁

I started it 2 weeks ago. Wasn't bold enough to put it in gear, but at least in theory it's drivable.

Maybe this winter l will write that thread.

Sorry for the hijack.
 

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I will note that a problem has appeared on the clock panel. The wrap material is lifting along the top of the emblem in the recess. I have not attempted to heat and push down the material. I am a bit concerned that heat cycling in the interior will cause this issue to reoccur even if I can successfully push it down. That emblem recess is the most difficult area of the clock panel to work the wrap into. I think I am going to PM the guy I stole this idea from on protouring.com and see if he has had the same problem and hopefully found a solution.
I was so happy when I got it done, bummer.
I can offer some suggestions here. Did a lot of wrapping parts on a different project. Contrary to what you said earlier, the heat gun is NOT your friend, at least not in this case! Search for cold pre-stretch technique for vinyl wrap. There are a lot of videos and articles. Inside corners like that are very difficult, because the vinyl's memory is going to tend to want to pull it out of the corner. I've worked really challenging insets similar to that by using one piece to first do the inside faces of the inset, and then use the full piece to just turn the corners into the inset, overlapping the precious edge, or butting the edges (if you decide to butt them, I recommend painting the surface under both wraps a similar color to hide any minor gaps that show through.

The good news is that wrap is cheap, so play with it, pull it off, try again, until you get what you want. Save the heat for once you have the piece laid down perfectly using cold stretch. I only add heat to activate the adhesive once the piece is shaped exactly like I want, and then sparingly.

Hope, this makes sense. It does make for a beautiful dash!
 

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Discussion Starter · #243 ·
As one of the few users of the 6R80 here, I wanted to note that I had found a manual from USShift on their stand alone shift controller for the 6R80. Although I have no plans to use their controller, there is a huge amount of information here regarding the manual shift and other functions of the transmission. I was trying to figure out how to detect reverse in order to control my backup lights. This document not only identified the harness wire from the transmission, but also the current capability of the output. The document helped me, hopefully others too.

 

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Discussion Starter · #244 ·
Of late I have been making progress on the transmission tunnel cover and the Lokar sport shifter for the 6R80.
I went back and worked on the tunnel cover to better match the framework pattern I gave the metal guy to work from. After reshaping and adding a bit of metal in one corner, it actually fit up decent when put in the car. When I made the pattern framework, I had cleco'd it in. I transferred the holes in the pattern to the cover. When I put the cover in place, I was amazed that 80 percent of the holes lined up. I added two additional holes to allow me to bolt it to the rear shifter frame holes. With the cover rigidly mounted in place, I decided to add the Lokar sport shifter and linkage. My tunnel cover is not as symmetrical as was the original, so I borrowed a laser level to paint a line pretty much in the center of the rear tunnel section to the firewall. From there I fiddled with the location until it was about as good as it was going to get. Using a mounting plate I made, I marked and drilled the mounting holes from the top. I confirmed I was OK with the location. I welded on square 5/16-18 nuts to the mounting plate. The mounting plate will be welded to the bottom of the cover for added strength in that area.
With the shifter in position, I had to determine where the shift cable would need to go through the trans tunnel. Looking from below, I determined where the shift lever on the transmission was located and how far down from the floor the cable would attach. I connected the cable to the shifter and bent the cable around to match what I thought was a good guess at the cable run. I drilled the hole at an angle to best match the angle the cable would need to pass through. I actually drilled the hole pretty much where it needs to be. The cable is quite stiff, so not much flexibility in how you run it.
I mounted up the lower bracket onto the transmission. It appeared that the transmission was shifting OK. I struggled a bit getting the bracket and cable position adjustments just right to allow the shifter to select all gear positions, that is P, R, N, D, and Sport. After trial and error for about an hour, I was able to get the shifter to be able to select Park as well as the Sport position.
I am happy enough with the install for now but there are a couple of things to do. I need to find a grommet for the cable pass through, probably a 3/4" as the 7/8" I had from a HF kit was too big. There are two spacers for the lower bracket that only need to be half a thick. Milling them down will make the cable run level with the transmission. Last, I bought the largest shifter boot the Lokar sold. The base of the shifter is very long and the boot plate will not go down as low as I would like. The console will have to be built up quite a bit, just trying to minimize the height. Before having my custom console built, I will cut down the shifter frame about a 1/4" to get the boot base plate to fit lower.

Here are a few pictures of the end result.




 

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Discussion Starter · #246 ·
Well I achieved a milestone today. I temporarily mounted the AAW fuse box so that I could locate where to drill the pass through hole for the front lighting wiring. I will run the lighting wiring in the left side fender well. With temporary wiring done, I have completed the mechanical prototyping needed prior to tearing the car down to a shell. I will start the tear down this week with everything forward of the firewall except the suspension. The week after, the shifter, engine, and transmission will come out. The car will then be in a state where I can weld the firewall and trans tunnel patches plus welding up all the unused holes in the engine compartment area. I will then final fit the Vintage Air evaporator and drill the holes for the heater line connections. I have reworked the heater hardlines to allow me to place the heater bypass valve in the engine compartment. I figure it will be a lot easier to finish up the evaporator install prior to welding in the new lower and upper cowl panels. I will then determine a final location for my Coyote power distribution box in the upper passenger side footwell. Last, the replacement taillight panel will be welded in.
I plan to have all the welding done by December when winter kicks into high gear here. Once this body welding is done, I plan to remove the front and rear suspension. Once the rear suspension is removed, I can clean up the floor at the rear so that I can seam seal and apply the epoxy. I also apply the epoxy from the firewall forward. At the rear I will also apply a chassis black in places where I will no longer have access to once the rear cradle is welded in. Hopefully at this point I will get access to a rotisserie so that I can finish some minor welding issues in the floor. The floor will be seam sealed, epoxied and painted with chassis black.
With the above tasks done, I can reinstall the suspension. Then it is time to move full bore into body work and paint.
This is one of those times when you realize that you have made progress toward getting it done. Schedule for paint is Fall 2022.
 

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Discussion Starter · #247 · (Edited)
Installation of Wilwood Electronic Parking Brake.

Many months ago I learned that Wilwood had introduced a retrofit kit for their Electronic Parking Brake system. The Electronic Parking Brake is a parking brake caliper where the single piston is driven by a electric motor. The benefit is that there are no cable, just wiring to the EPB units.
I have the Wilwood brake kit 140-7140 on the back of the car now. This rear brake kit uses a internal drum style brake as the parking brake. It is design to be actuated by cables.
I have the Wilwood 140-15978 Electronic Parking Brake kit designed for 0.81" thick rotors. There is another kit for the thicker rotors.
With the retrofit kits there are no spacers or brackets supplied, it is up to the end user to design and fabricate these brackets for the particular brake system that is one the car.
The installation instructions for the kit provide some mounting information, however without knowledge of how the system should be mounted, the instructions are lacking in detail IMO.
Many calls went to Wilwood tech support in an effort to get a simple questions answered. IMO, the 1st tier techs were pretty useless. They were unable to answer my questions. They were seemingly unable to put me through to engineering. So trying to get my initial questions answered was a fruitless and frustrating experience.
Moving on, from my Factory Five days I knew of a Wilwood distributor Southern Arizona, Gordon Levy. Through one of the Factory Five Forums, I reached out to Gordon and asked for help. A few hours later he left me a message with a phone number and asked that I call him. I called him and discussed what I was doing. He has installed these retrofit kits on a number of cars, so he had first hand experience. He told me what I needed in a matter of minutes. We continued to talk and he can also provide dyno tuning for Coyote based builds. Something I will use him for in the future.
Getting back to the EPB install. The primary question I had was where to position the outer brake pad with relation to the outer rotor face. The outer pad in the EPB does not float, it is basically fixed. So it was my belief that it should be positioned as close to the rotor face as possible without contact in normal use. Gordon Levy confirmed this providing my starting point.

I used a clamp on the rotor to provide something to anchor the EPB to. I simply used a number of zip ties to hold the EPB on the rotor.


I had already decided to make the mounting bracket from 0.3125 thick 6061 aluminum. I drilled a mounting hole in one corner so that I could hang it from the EPB. I needed to determine the thickness of the spacer required. I bought a couple of the Wilwood 300-9503 spacers thinking they could be used for the EPB as they were used to mount the primary caliper, but no, not even close to being thick enough. I used one of the 9503 spacers along with a feeler gauge I stacked up until I was able to get the aluminum plate square to the rotor. Now this was not a precise way of doing it, but it got me close. The stacked up feeler gauge plus the 9503 spacer resulted in a measured 0.905 thickness.



A friend has a well equipped shop with an industrial scale mill. I stacked up and glued two pieces of 0.75 x 3 inch maple to make a buck. I drilled out the patterns for two spacers. We then planed and milled the buck down to 0.905. You can see in the picture below the rough cut spacer vs. the original 9503 spacer.


With the spacers made, I moved on to making a design for the bracket. The 9503 bracket serves as a model for that side of the bracket. I then made a template that fit the EPB mounting area. I have used Microsoft Visio a lot in my career for documentation and simple 2D drafting work. I used Visio to create a model of my mounting bracket.
The EPB instructions indicate the mounting bolt circle radius should be 6.2 inches for use with the 12.19" rotor that I have. I determined the bolt circle radius for the spacer and mounting brackets should be 3.3 inches. These are the two critical radii as they determine mounting to the backing plate and the position of the EPB caliper on the bracket. With this information together with the 9503 bracket and the EPB mount template I made, I can up with a design. Although the Visio representation of the bracket was good, I found when printed, that the printed copy was not one to one. I printed the bracket design and made a copy in a 3/16" hard chipboard I had. This was my first design verification. I mounted it to the backing plate and EPB to see how close I was.



The first test fit was close, but I wanted to change the clearance around the EPB motor. A couple of iterations on the computer and the third design was good to go to metal.



The rough cut bracket still needs some cleanup on the edges. However, the bracket bolted to the EPB housing without issue. I mounted the bracket and wood spacer on the car. The EPB caliper was added. When I tightened down the bracket on the backing plate and the EPB caliper, I found the outer pad was in full contact with the outer face of the rotor, but close. I used a series of shims I bought from McMaster Carr to shim the EPB housing moving the outer pad off the rotor. It required 0.022 or 22 thousands of shim material to relieve the contact. Sorry I failed to take a assembled picture and I have disassembled everything for today. Tomorrow I will have the second spacer milled down 0.020 for our second evaluation. After milling and reassembly, it should only take 0.003 or so of shims to find the final required thickness for the spacer. I will add a fully assembled picture once I have the revised spacer tomorrow.

A note, with the EPB spacer and bracket design mostly verified, I decided to gut out the drum parking brake components leaving a bare backing plate. A slot and mounting holes remained at the top, so I made up rubber plugs and attached them with black silicone. I want to keep water out as I don't want the bearing retainer to be exposed to water and potentially have start rust in there.


So a good week or so of research and work. Really happy as I did not want parking brake cables if I could avoid it. This approach is so much cleaner than a conventional parking brake that is e-brake driven.
For anyone interested, I will help you as much as possible should you attempt the same type of conversion. That said, I will not give out my design as I do not want to be held liable should my design not work and I will leave it at that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #248 ·
Here is a last shot of the EPB bolted onto the car and shimmed to required outer pad to rotor clearance. This is as far as I am going to take the evaluation until I fab the spacer in metal. A 1x2.5x12" bar of 6061 is in the mail from Online Metals, should arrive Wednesday. Right now the plan is to mill the spacer height to 0.900". That should allow for a shim to set the final clearance. I will check the driver's side before we mill the spacer just to make sure we have the same required spacing.



Once I got going, not that bad of a job if you have the necessary tools. For others interested in doing this, at a minimum I would suggest you need a good drill press, metal cutting band saw, air right angle die grinder with a good metal cutting burr. A 2D CAD system would be helpful, but not required. With a large compass and calipers you could layout the bracket on large format paper. The CAD system simply makes design changes easier with a means to store the end result.
 

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Discussion Starter · #249 ·
Wrapping up the EBP bracket and spacer fabrication. The last piece was making the spacers in aluminum. I bought a 1 x 2.5 inch 6061 bar for the spacers. In hindsight, not a good choice as cutting the spacers to shape was not easy. I burned up the first 10-14 TPI bandsaw blade trying to cut the spacers. A friend said I needed to drop the TPI down to 6 for the thicker metal. I bought a new 10-14 TPI and a 6 TPI blade. The new 6 TPI blade finished cutting the spacers quickly. After cutting, I did a clean up pass using a air 90 Die Grinder with a good burr. In hindsight, I should not have used T6 for the spacers, T5 would have been plenty hard and easier to cut. If I were to do this again, I would have bought two Wilwood spacers and tack welded them together. I would then mill the spacer to final thickness. Buying Wilwood spacers would have saved money and time.
With the shape refined, I installed the parts on the car. The aluminum bar used for the spacers was milled to 0.900 before drilling and cutting the individual spacers. On the PS, I found that I needed 18 thousandths in shims to move the outer pad off the rotor. On the DS, no shims were necessary. I find it a bit odd that the need for shims on the PS is so much greater than the DS. I will order shims from McMaster Carr. I will likely take 10 thousandths off the PS spacer to reduce the need for shims. Note in the picture the two spacers are the same, funny as to how the camera makes them look different in size.



Time to move on and back to the engine compartment tear down. I have been taking my time to bag and label all the hoses and fasteners to make reassembly easier. Last item to remove is the Lokar shifter cable. Plan is to pull the engine and transmission early next week, then let the welding begin.
 

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Discussion Starter · #250 ·
So I started thinking about a personalized plate for the project. I started looking at the personalized plates available in AZ. Then I saw that a AZ Coyote Hockey Team plate was available.
The plate seems to fit the car as the engine is a coyote. After checking on availability, I decided on 70 B2 for the text.
Having the howling coyote on the plate should be a good indicator as to what is under the hood.
 

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So I started thinking about a personalized plate for the project. I started looking at the personalized plates available in AZ. Then I saw that a AZ Coyote Hockey Team plate was available.
The plate seems to fit the car as the engine is a coyote. After checking on availability, I decided on 70 B2 for the text.
Having the howling coyote on the plate should be a good indicator as to what is under the hood.
I would bet very few would make the connection to your motor; most are just going to think you're a fan of a really bad and poorly managed hockey team. :ROFLMAO:
 

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Alan - I have a couple of questions for the electrical engineer. Are you running a pos battery cable all the way to the alternator from the trunk or are you using the FPPDB as an intermediate stopping point? Also, where did you end up mounting the FPPDB? Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #253 ·
Alan - I have a couple of questions for the electrical engineer. Are you running a pos battery cable all the way to the alternator from the trunk or are you using the FPPDB as an intermediate stopping point? Also, where did you end up mounting the FPPDB? Thanks!
Because of the trunk mounted battery, I did run a #1 AWG cable from the battery direct to the starter. I also ran a #6 AWG cable from the battery to the power distribution box. I am placing the PDB in the upper right corner of the passenger footwell. Since the Vintage Air evaporator does not used the stove pipe, I am using that area to mount the PDB. I will try to position it such that the cover can be opened and the relays/fuses serviced if needed. Also note, I have a 250A megafuse, supplied by FP, and I added a second 100A megafuse mounted on a panel next to my battery. This way both runs are fused as close to the battery as practical. I also mounted my fuel pump inertia switch on that same panel for convenience. I then connect the main power wire for my AAW fuse block to the stud on the PDB.
The recommendation from FP that the controls pack located no further than 10 feet away from the battery was the reason for the dual run. My run from the battery to the starter is about 13 feet. The greatest voltage drop will be at the starter terminal when cranking. By running the second #6 AWG cable from the battery to the PDB, the controls pack will only see the voltage drop at the battery itself, actually a bit less due to the voltage drop in the #6 cable. The draw on the #6 cable will be minimal as it will source the controls pack and the fuel pump.
I found that I could run both the #1 and #6 cables down the PS sill channel. So I am able to keep the exposed run on the #1 cable at a minimum.
Some may look at this approach as being excessive, however I wanted to make sure I had maximum voltage for the controls pack. I am confident that I will have full power for the controls pack when starting.
I do have some pictures in my build thread for reference.
In the Factory Five cars, typically one would use the starter terminal as a distribution point with a direct run from the battery to the starter and then a secondary wire from the starter to the PDB. IMO, the stud on the PDB is not of sufficient size to be used as a intermediate distribution point to the starter. If I recall the stud on the PDB is a #10. A guy on one of the Factory Five forums put a clamp style ammeter next to the starter when he started up his first gen Coyote. The peak current draw by the starter was 175A. I used that number as a guide in formulating a plan for my 12V distribution and cable sizing.
Of note, I used Battery Cables USA for all my cabling and terminals. Their cable quality is excellent with high stand count and very flexible insulation.
 

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Hey Alan - thanks for the detailed reply. About the 12V Batt terminal on the alternator - are you going to run that to the starter and then to the battery? I have seen it done that way and it seems like a good idea to me, but I am no expert and would appreciate your opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #255 ·
Hey Alan - thanks for the detailed reply. About the 12V Batt terminal on the alternator - are you going to run that to the starter and then to the battery? I have seen it done that way and it seems like a good idea to me, but I am no expert and would appreciate your opinion.
Yes, I am going to run a #4 AWG cable from the starter to the alternator. I was fortunate that I used a Mustang GT donor. I was able harvest parts and I was able to see how Ford did it on a production application of the Coyote. I am repurposing a piece of cable that already had the lug for the alternator on it. I will just cut to length and put the proper lug on it for connection to the Alt.
 
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