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To get the body level on the lift, I found I needed some method of leveling the body. Don't know if it is a characteristic of the Max Jax lifts, but mine does not lift evenly from side to side, even at maximum lift height. So I found that BendPak sells adjustable lift pads for two post lifts that do fit on the Max Jax arms. They work well and gave me about 2" of adjustability at each pad. The adjustable pads are limited to 2" because there is no hole in the Max Jax lift arm as there is in a Bend Pak model. Once the body was leveled on the lift, it was easy to get the sub-frame in place, aligned, level and square. I got my set of adjustable lift pads from Summit, just added the link below to show a picture.

https://jmcautomotiveequipment.com/bendpak-adjustable-screw-lift-pad-with-receiver-each/

Alan

Mine doesn't lift perfectly even either. The delay is about 1/2 a second or so it seems between clunks of the stops. At the top it seems level enough :dunno:

Thanks for the link.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
I guess one would say that the imbalance on movement of the lift arms is a Dannmar feature, no exta charge! I did not want to spend an additional $240 for the adjustable lift pads, however the ability to get the car body leveled on the lift is priceless. I have to chalk that expenditure up to be just one of many purchases that I did not know I would need to make when starting this project. That said, next tool purchase will be a rotisserie.

Alan
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Question on Front Inner Fender Panel to Radiator Support Alignment

On my 1970 Mach 1, I am replacing the front inner fender panels on both sides as well as the radiator support. Please take a look at the two pictures below regarding the alignment of the front inner fender panel to the radiator support. In the first picture you are looking at the driver's side. Note that the two ovals holes in the panels align. The second picture shows the alignment of the front inner fender panel and the radiator support. Note in this picture the holes sort of align, but the hole in the fender panel will not align the same, I cannot move it forward to center the two holes as with the driver's side, what gives? Is this normal or is it identifying the panels are not aligned in the same way? The replacement sheet metal is Dynacorn, which I thought would provide a better fit without issues. Maybe this is normal, just checking with you experts out there.





Thanks, Alan
 

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I haven't found any aftermarket panels that don't require some form of beating/bending/trimming to fit. Don't go by the holes...make sure the measurements are right...then trim the holes with a dremel tool with the small carbide grinding bit.
 

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I haven't found any aftermarket panels that don't require some form of beating/bending/trimming to fit. Don't go by the holes...make sure the measurements are right...then trim the holes with a dremel tool with the small carbide grinding bit.
I used the alignment holes as a quick guide but didn't depend on them. I used my old before measurements, and did a lot of linear and diagonal measurements to verify square and depended upon actual numbers rather than ends of the sheetmetal or punched holes.
 

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A lot of guys around here have built a rotisserie out of wood. I think the cost is about $100.
Now that is something id be interested in building...
 

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Discussion Starter #29
A lot of guys around here have built a rotisserie out of wood. I think the cost is about $100.
I can see someone building a wheel dolly out of wood, but not a rotisserie. I will need the ability of rotate the body for access underneath when media blasting and painting, something that I would not attempt to do with a wooden structure.

Alan
 

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I can see someone building a wheel dolly out of wood, but not a rotisserie. I will need the ability of rotate the body for access underneath when media blasting and painting, something that I would not attempt to do with a wooden structure.

Alan
I have seen some pictures of rotisseries made of wood and I don't know that I would completely trust them but the ones I have seen here are actually big half or quarter wheels with the car between and you turn the whole thing. They look pretty solid. Google wooden rotisserie and there are a bunch of pictures.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Although I appreciate the suggestions, not going there. Too much invested in the car and not willing to get hurt trying to save a few bucks with a home made solution.

This has gotten off topic, no need to continue this.

Alan
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Aligned Shock Tower Delete Panels

A couple of weeks ago, I received the rubber splash shields that work with the shock tower delete panels. TCP sells them separately from the weld-in front sub-frame, so I did not get them in my original order. Turns out, the only way IMO to properly position the tower delete panels, is to use install the splash shield and use them to correctly locate the tower delete panels. The splash flaps fit around the upper A-arm support with only about a 1/8" to spare on each side, so when centered, the tower delete panel is correctly positioned. Anyway, I completed the initial fitment, now I need to remove the panels and grind clean all the mating surfaces in preparation for welding. I plan to tack weld the tower delete panels with the inner fender aprons initially, then fit all the bracketry for the hood, install the fenders and hood to verify all the sheet metal is where it belongs. I will then tear it all apart and final plug and stitch weld the tower delete panels and inner fender aprons. I will leave the new radiator support clamped in place only so that installation and removal of the Coyote and 6R80 transmission is easier during modification of the transmission tunnel.



 

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Discussion Starter #34
Front Suspension Is On Its Way

The week before last I ordered the G-machine front suspension for the build. The G-machine package is geared toward a high performance pro touring type build. You can configure the package somewhat in that you can choose the finish, hardware, end link styles, brake size, shock type, and sway bar. I would say I put together a middle of the market package and still went into sticker shock. Lets say without quoting numbers, it was a bunch! Well you know what they say, the good stuff costs, so I am hopeful the parts are equal to their reputation. I went with the single adjustable shocks/coil overs and the 13" 4-piston Wilwoods.

I got notice that UPS picked up the parts today, so I should have the stuff in about a week at my door.

For those who might like more information, here is a link to the TCP data sheet for the weld-in front clip. It shows the sub-frame, suspension, steering rack, etc.

http://www.cachassisworks.com/Attachments/DataSheets/KCXX_DS_WEB.pdf
 

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Discussion Starter #35
Suspension Components Arrived

The brown truck brought the first delivery of front suspension components today. I have been going through all the boxes and creating an inventory for what I received. So far I have accounted for:
1. Power Steering Rack ( A surprise since it was supposed to be back ordered )
2. Splined front anti-roll bar.
3. Spindles
4. Upper Control Arms and HW
5. Hubs with bearings and studs
6. Drivers and Passenger side 13” Wilwood rotors

More to do today and then enter items onto my parts spreadsheet.

I have removed the drivers side tower delete and front inner fender apron so that I could remove the protective coatings in the areas where the parts will be welded. I am also putting holes in the panels for plug welding where applicable. I installed the hood latch support bracket that connects the front of the sub-frame to the top of the radiator support. Good thing I did, I pointed out that there is an errant picture in the TCP installation instructions. One picture showed the radiator support to be in front of a bracket for welding, yet another pictures showed in behind. The bracket and radiator support did not fit well together when the bottom of the radiator support was in front of the welding flange, so I moved it to behind the flange and the components lined up much better. A lesson to remember as some of the feedback I have received here on VMForum was to assemble as much as I can before even tack welding the parts together, now I know why. In addition to finishing the inventory, I hope I will be able to reassemble the drivers side tower delete and front inner fender apron panels. Friday, I hope to get the passenger side tower delete and front inner fender apron panels removed and prepared and then reassembled. With those items done, it will be time to check my parts inventory to see if I have some of the other front brackets required to mount the front valence, bumper, inner fender liners, fenders, grill, etc. I intend on assembling the entire front end of the car to verify that the inner fender aprons and radiator support are in the right place before disassembly and final welding.
 

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holly crap man! I so just went through TCP's website and priced out what I would need to do this swap on my 69 vert. while the front clip is affordable, the suspension and steering to finish it out.. not so much. Is there a way to use others front suspension parts with this? without brakes im well over $8K in parts.


which brings me to this: why did you do with this over other kits that are complete?
 

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Discussion Starter #37 (Edited)
holly crap man! I so just went through TCP's website and priced out what I would need to do this swap on my 69 vert. while the front clip is affordable, the suspension and steering to finish it out.. not so much. Is there a way to use others front suspension parts with this? without brakes im well over $8K in parts.
which brings me to this: why did you do with this over other kits that are complete?
Yeah, the TCP weld-in front clip with suspension, steering rack, and shocks is expensive, however not that different from their peers. At one time I considered doing the complete frame from Schwartz performance. A full chassis with suspension, IRS, brakes, etc. was on the order of $28K. Needless to say I rejected the idea. I then started looking at TCP, Heights, and Detroit Speed. The comparison was eye opening, TCP actually looked to be the least costly at the time. I also was leaning toward the weld-in front clip from TCP because my car had suffered some front end damage at the hands of the original owner. The passenger side frame was tweeked a bit and the sheet metal from the rear inner fender aprons needed replacement. So, based on the condition of the car, it appeared to be easiest to ditch the OEM front sub-frame, sheet metal, and shock towers. I am installing a 2017 Gen 2 Coyote, so I wanted the front of the car to be stronger and more twist resistant than stock. Given my constraints and desires, it was cheaper to go with TCP for my project IMO.

That said, my initial outlay for the weld-in front clip was $2.3K including the transmission cross member. I used CJPP for the front clip because of the points I could use toward other purchases. When I went to buy the front suspension, I found that no other vendor sold the full line of TCP parts. Both CJPP and Mustang Depot sold some of the parts, but not all. I also found that MD was charging for the PS rack where it was included from TCP. I contacted CJPP customer service and discussed my dilemma, but they could not accommodate anything not available on the web site. When I priced out the suspension package initially, I had included dual adjustable shocks and 14" Wilwoods. After reading some posts on another Mustang forum, the consensus was that the dual adjustable shocks provided too many adjustments and it was suggested that single adjustable was more than adequate. So I went with the g-machine pro-touring setup, but not optioned out to the Nth degree. The cost of the package with shipping came to a bit over $6.7K including 13" Wilwoods and a late model Ford bracket for the transmission cross member. All in for the front so far is about $9K. In the beginning, I thought I would be more in the $7K range, but I missed some of the extras I decided to go with.

One has to trade off your requirements against cost. Given I expect on the order of 500 crank HP from the Coyote, strength and rigidity were a priority. Over the last month or so I have looked at packages for the rear suspension including the Fab9 rear axle, TruTrac center section with gears, axles, brakes, etc. Again another sticker shock. The rear setup will be on the order of the same amount as the front, maybe a bit less. So is $17K to $18K a lot of money, yes, but the quality of the parts are top notch. I was looking at the welding on the A-arms and they are a work of art.

All in all the plan for the car was a middle to higher end pro-touring restomod. I think the build will be well received by all who look at it when it is done. There is another factor to throw in, I was very fortunate to find a 2017 GT donor for the engine and transmisson. Want to get some sticker shock, price out the Ford Performance Coyote/6R80 combination, about $17K retail plus the controls pack, alternator, accessory drive system, headers, etc. I figure you could easily be in the $20K retail range and possibly a few thousand less if you pick the right vendors. I got my donor car purchased at auction and delivered for $6.5K. The car was only 4 months old when it was totaled out from front end damage and being striped. The car had a junk title and could not be registered for road use again, so I got it cheap. Most builders would not be so fortunate to find a donor like I did. So, compared to paying retail for the drive train, the cheap donor allowed me to spend more on the suspension part of the build. Again I was looking at the end game and the quality of the build.

I will mention that TCP is in or has completed a price increase. On my splined front sway bar alone, it went up $100. Other items went up a few percent or more.

Alan
 

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Discussion Starter #38
Shock Tower Delete Panel Modifications

Wow, I see it has been a while since I posted anything about the shock tower delete panel install. Initially, I did not order the splash flaps with the subframe kit, a mistake. IMO, the splash flaps are absolutely necessary to align the shock tower delete panels. I ordered the splash flaps from a vendor in San Diego which took 3 weeks to receive them where I thought I should have gotten them in one week. Oh well, scratch that vendor for any future orders.
Once the splash flaps were received, I installed them and noticed that I had to muscle the shock tower delete panels into position to align them. It was like I had to rotate them forward counterclockwise in order for the splash flap to align with the shock mount. I contacted TCP, but simply got confirmation that I had the correct parts for my 1970 Mustang. I was not satisfied with the fit, so I took it upon myself to look for another solution. I thought about getting full replacement inner fender aprons and shock tower delete panels from Mustangs to Fear, but too much added expense and another unknown regarding their fitment. So I decided to prototype changes to the existing shock tower delete panels in construction cardboard as verification of any modifications. The following posts will document the changes and process I went through to achieve the fit I was after for my vehicle.

Alan
 

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Discussion Starter #39
Prototying Changes in Cardboard

As shown in the picture below, I worked out the necessary modifications by first relocating the splash flap on the existing panels. I then made up a cardboard version of the shock tower delete panels to verify my changes.













Alan
 

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Discussion Starter #40
Modifying Original Shock Tower Delete Panels

With a modification layout that appeared to work, the next step was to create a modified shock tower delete panel that was a hybrid of metal and cardboard. I chose to cut away the lower third of the shock tower delete panel just below the bead rolled center section. I cut away the lower third of my cardboard panel along the same cut line and used package tape to connect the two. I then installed the modified hybrid panel to confirm it fit as did the full cardboard panel. I did find I wanted to rotate the opening for the A-arms a bit for better alignment, so I added a little wedge piece of cardboard. At this point I was satisfied with the fit, time to move on to metal.





Alan
 
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