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Discussion Starter #161
Last week I received a updated version of the Ultimate Headers PN 471071. I installed them on the engine and the clearance issues previously identified had been addressed. However, the clearance from the PS header to the starter motor remains very tight, maybe tighter than the previous set. To make the starter have a long life, I will install a heat shield on the mini-starter for peace of mind. The fitment of these headers are very good with the Coyote in the 70 Mustang. These headers were designed to work with the Heidts crossmember and the full Roadster shop chassis. It just turned out that they also work well with the Total Control Products front clip. Here are some pictures for reference.

In the last two pictures, low profile clamps have been added that include the bungs for the O2 sensors. These clamps provide some freedom to rotate the end of the clamp helping with alignment with your exhaust.










 

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Discussion Starter #162
While the engine was out, I worked on two issues in the engine compartment. The first was clearance between the alternator and the DS subframe. In the interest of making the car more serviceable down the road, I found that there was not enough room to permit the alternator to be removed unless the engine was lifted off its mounts.With some experimentation, I found that I only needed about a 1/2" more clearance to be able to remove the alternator. I cut the subframe and welded in a temporary patch to verify the mod. With the engine and transmission back in the car, I verified the mod does provide sufficient clearance to remove the alternator with the engine in place. Now the remote oil filter and lines will get in the way, but it will be a lot easier to just disconnect those components as compared to what would have to be disconnected to lift the engine.





The patch for the firewall was also tacked in with the engine out. I am keeping the Charge Motion Control Valves or CMCVs on the back of the intake to retain the stock driveability. The space between the back of the intake and the firewall is very tight unless you make a modification to the firewall. We went that route and moved the firewall back about 1 3/4" providing space for the heater bypass valve, heater hoses, and the fuel pressure regulator, all of which will occupy some of this new space.


 

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Boss50h: you're killing it. I'm not going the same route as you, but thanks to you and your build I am learning a lot of what does/doesn't work. Thanks for the great write ups and info, some day I'll catch up...

I forgot something else that may prove useful for anyone doing a coyote swap, may prevent modifying ds frame rail.

 

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Discussion Starter #165
Blutruck1: both the solutions you posted are interesting, but neither applies to my build. The Detroit Speed relocation bracket, may or may not have helped me. I found the subframe mod to be more effective as I own a welder to weld in the patch. Once fully welded, the patch will look like it was designed to be there.
The serpentine belt system to permit a supercharger to be used with AC and PS is also interesting, but expensive. Add the cost of the serpentine system to the Edlebrock supercharger and you have a lot of dough tied up. Putting a Coyote in a 1st gen Mustang is a challenge now matter how complicated you decide to make the build. I have found that trying to integrate parts from multiple vendors to be the greatest challenge. Every time I move onto a new aspect of the build, I have to tell myself it is custom and expect that nothing is bolt on. I plan to share my alterations to my subframe connectors next month. Every time I solve a problem and move on to the next, I get another dose of motivation.
 

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Alan,

Glad to see progress is still being made! Your work and car is looking fantastic and those headers are a tidy piece of business too!!
 

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Discussion Starter #167
Alan,

Glad to see progress is still being made! Your work and car is looking fantastic and those headers are a tidy piece of business too!!
Yes, progress is still being made, just slow. I never thought it would take 6 months to work out the details for the headers, but Ultimate Headers was trying to work out the bugs without a Coyote engine in the shop. So they were working with customers, like me, to refine the design. Fortunately, others will benefit from what I and others have learned along the way.
We are heading into the winter months with first snow of the season Friday, so progress will slow even more for the next two months or so. I will be looking for projects I can work on inside the home where it is warm. With the header development behind me, I hope to see lots of progress in the spring, and hopefully, first start in the fall of next year.
 

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Discussion Starter #168 (Edited)
I finally completed one of my Winter projects, reconditioning the dash instrument and clock pods. Although the woodgrain surrounds used by Ford look OK, my clock pod panel was destroyed by rust and required replacement. Of course, the new clock surround looks a bit different than the original instrument surround simply due to age. I saw a 70 Mach 1 done on Protouring.com that wrapped the woodgrain with a 3M Brushed Steel Vinyl Wrap and loved the look. It makes the surrounds look more modern and uniquely different. With my car to be a Boss 302 tribute, using something other than the woodgrain seemed appropriate for a performance model. Here are some pictures and I will follow up with details of what was done.





The clock panel is new as the original plastic cracked and broken in places probably due to UV exposure over time. The plastic instrument panel is new but the surround is original. I tried to paint and restore the plastic portion, but could not restore the chrome trim to something I wanted to look at.
The instruments and clock are Dakota Digital VHX type. As I have gotten older, I find I do not like black backgrounds, so I went with the white. I like the look and when the gauges are illuminated, it will switch to a dark background.
Now for the wrap effort, not fun unless you have a lot of experience applying the wrap material. I had a number of fails with it taking a second 2'x5' roll to finish up.
Lessons learned, a hair dryer is your friend, it both allows the material to stretch and conform to the shape of the panel as well as activating the adhesive. If you have not done something like this before, expect a learning curve. The clock panel was the most difficult with the emblem area in the lower right corner a real PITA as you are trying to stretch the wrap to conform to the indented area. Make sure your fingernails are freshly clipped and filed as it is easy to damage the wrap when warm. Two fails were a result of fingernail damage alone. In time you get it and are finally successful. Don't try to cut the material too small as you need material to grab onto at the edges. Also be careful of the wrap trying to fold onto itself, once you have a bond between two adhesive sides, very difficult to separate.
I wanted a different look, hopefully others like it too.
 

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HOLY, that looks awesome! Do you have a link to the vinyl?
 

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Discussion Starter #171
HOLY, that looks awesome! Do you have a link to the vinyl?
Here is a link to the product on Amazon. You are going to want to buy the 2'x5' roll as the grain is horizontal across the 2 ft wide portion. It probably takes a bit under 24 inches of width to cover the panels. The 10 sq ft will give you enough to make multiple tries to each panel. If you have not done this before, I would suggest you also buy one of the wrap installation tool kits as the squeegee assists in smoothing out the flat areas.
Note the link says 3M 1080 but it also says 2080 in the product description. The 2080 is the newest product and seems to stretch and conform to the compound curves in the emblem area better. My first roll was the 1080, second roll was the 2080.

Eventually I will do the door cards too to completely cover all the woodgrain. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #172
Looks super-clean Alan! What color have you decided to go with on the interior?
Sven: The interior will be black and dark charcoal. I bought the TMI Sport R foam and seat cover set for front and rear. When I got the seat covers, I found what TMI calls black is really a dark charcoal grey. I went with a grey stripe and stitching, nice contrast without being gaudy. The Sport R foam adds more bolstering allowing me to reuse the original seat frames and keep the overall shape of the stock high back Mach 1 seats. I will go this route for round one and then see if I like the seats. If not, I may consider aftermarket front seats down the road. At this point I am taking the approach of get it done and driveable according to the original plan, then upgrade later if necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter #173 (Edited)
I will note that a problem has appeared on the clock panel. The wrap material is lifting along the top of the emblem in the recess. I have not attempted to heat and push down the material. I am a bit concerned that heat cycling in the interior will cause this issue to reoccur even if I can successfully push it down. That emblem recess is the most difficult area of the clock panel to work the wrap into. I think I am going to PM the guy I stole this idea from on protouring.com and see if he has had the same problem and hopefully found a solution.
I was so happy when I got it done, bummer.
 

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Discussion Starter #174
Finally some progress to report. Over the last couple of weeks, we trailered the car over to a friend's 4-post lift to weld in the SpinTech subframe connectors.
This task was far more labor intensive than I had ever expected. My build is using the Total Control Products full length from clip which replaces the OEM front frame rails and supports under the floor. As one would expect, the dimensions of the TCP support frame rails under the floor are not exactly the same as the OEM. When fitting the subframe connectors I was not at all happy with the way they fit with respect to the floor. I was not going to deform the floor to fit the SFCs, so modification of the SFCs was the answer. I ended up sectioning the front 2/3s of the SFCs on both sides. I added as much as 3/16 inch of metal to raise the mounting flanges up to the floor. This was a learning process as I was not completely happy with the work first done on the passenger side. The drivers side came out much better which caused me to go back and improve the passenger side SFC. I had a number of things come up that put off the work for months and finally finished the SFC mods several weeks ago. Also note, I reworked the end of the SFCs to shorten them a few inches and to enclose the end. Since I opted for a sway bar for my rear suspension, I found that there was no room to run the exhaust either over or under the rear axle. I will run my exhaust out the sides just in front of the rear wheel wells. This should provide a race look consistent with my Trans Am look for the car.
What I learned could be of use to others. One, I think there is some variation in the floors of the first gen Mustangs, that is the 65-66, 67-68, and 69-70 are all a bit different. So when SpinTech sells one product to fit all the variations, you can imagine that the fit is not perfect even for un-modified cars.
It was recommended that the SFCs should be welded in with the car weighted on its wheels. What I found did not prove out this recommendation. The SFCs fit the same on the 4-post lift with weight on the suspension as it did on my two-post lift being supported at the front and rear of the pinch weld seams. Your results might be different, but that is what I saw, so there was no arching of the floor when the car was on the 2-post lift.
I pushed the SFCs up against the floor using a floor jack and a 2x4 to close the gap as much as possible. I then put in #10 self drilling sheet metal screws to pull the floor and SFCs together. Since the SFCs fit well, the floor did not strip out when pulling the floor and SFCs together. After welding the screws were removed and the holes welded up.
When welding in the SFCs I learned a number of lessons about making good welds. Good access, light, and closeup vision are key to not making a mess. The car was loaded onto the lift a bit off center and found it was much easier on one side than the other. Being too far away from the weld resulted in ugly welds and, in a couple of cases, blow throughs. I performed enough welding on the 4-post lift to feel we could move the car back to my 2-post lift to finish up the welding.
Other things learned, overhead welding comes with potential injury from splatter, ask me how I know. As an amatuer welder, I never had issues before, but also never performed overhead welding. I have a number of burns from the first day that are still healing, ouch! On day two I borrowed a friend's welding jacket, no more burns. As a result I purchased a my own welding jacket. I was also loaned a magnetic ground clamp, very useful as there were only a few places where I could attach my ground without it. I bought one for myself as well.
I still have some more welding to do, but it had gotten very hot here in AZ. Too hot to wear all the protection and be even halfway comfortable.
Here are a few pictures of the results so far.

Here is the car on the trailer, first time out of my garage since this build started.


Here is the passenger side working from the rear forward






Here is the passenger side working from the rear forward




 

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Discussion Starter #176 (Edited)
Absolutely NOTHING ever fits like what's claimed!
Boy isn't that the truth! As I have discovered many times, vendors parts mostly fit, but are not designed to work with other vendors aftermarket parts. Modifications and adjustments are simply part of the process, so I have gotten used to it. All in all, I have to be happy with the results, so I often spend far more time on something than many would. It is the engineer in me and the standards you see set by professional shops like Kindigit and others.
Once this task is complete, time to work on the brake and fuel line plumbing.
 

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Nice work. I'm going to drill some drain holes in mine. Even though I used Master Series Silver on the inside of mine before welding, I think there are spots where water could get in and don't want it sitting in there and rusting from the inside out.
 

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Discussion Starter #178
Nice work. I'm going to drill some drain holes in mine. Even though I used Master Series Silver on the inside of mine before welding, I think there are spots where water could get in and don't want it sitting in there and rusting from the inside out.
Thanks Dan. Based upon your recommendation, I also used the Master Series Silver on the inside. I applied it everywhere welding would not occur. The two coats on the bottom should really help resist prevent rust. I used a copper infused weld through primer in the areas where I placed plug weld holes and along the mounting flanges. I even coated the bottom of the floor with MSS where I could.
Once the welding is done, I will apply seam sealer to close up the gaps in the flange seams and to the beads in the floor.
Lots of work, just hope the end result is worth all the effort.
 

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Speaking of MSS and welding... I'm going to be using this on frame rails, etc. But I've been wondering if you can use it on the backside of where I'll be spot welding (i.e. bottom of the frame rail flange where I'd be spot welding the new trunk floor from the top). Or should one just leave the MSS back a couple of inches until welding is done and then coat backsides? Sorry for a possibly silly question. I'm new to all of this and just trying to learn and prep and plan ahead. Also Boss5Oh, what copper-infused weld-thru primer did you use and did you like it? TIA
 
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