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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,

Got everything up to the pushrods installed today on the 289, not bad for a day's work. I decided to call it a day because I wasn't sure what I was supposed to do next.

Can somebody give me an idiot-proof rundown of how to install rocker arms and adjust valve lash? Or tell me what needs to be done? The book I am following does not make much sense to me and I would love to hear from others about what needs to happen.

Thanks!

Alex
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I have hydraulic lifters (all new) along with new pushrods, if that's necessary information.
 

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What book do you have? I have the Monroe book. The procedure there is almost identical to one I saw on YouTube a few weeks ago. Basically, you get a cylinder at TDC on the compression stroke so you know both valves are fully closed and both lifters are on the cam base. Turn the adjusting nut for one rocker arm until you just take up all the slack movement in the pushrod, then tighten 3/4 turn more.

#1 at TDC on the compression stroke - Adjust #1, #7, and #8 intake and #1, #5, and #4 exhaust
Rotate the crank 180 degrees (1/2 turn) and adjust #4 and #5 intake, #2 and #6 exhaust
Rotate the crank 270 degrees (3/4 turn) and adjust #2, #3, and #6 intake and #7, #3, and #8 exhaust

I've never done it either, but it's pretty simple and the procedure makes sense.

The video said NOT to fill the lifters with oil. The Monroe book (which I have heard is good) says to prime them with oil. I'm not entirely sure it will make a difference... I haven't gotten far enough along to fully understand the way the lifters work internally, but it would seem that after a few seconds the oil in the lifter would be forced into the pushrod.
 

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I, for one, have never "not" primed the lifters. Not sure the why "video" author stated "Not" to fill?
If using the adjustment process mentioned, It's very helpful to first, carefully, chalk mark the pulley every 90º. There are other methods that don't require this. One I've used, has you follow the firing order, starting with #1, then progressing through the F/O.
Which ever is easier to follow will be fine. But, the key is insuring the valve(s) is fully closed during the firing stroke in each case.
BTW, are you assembling a stock engine, that is stock heads, cam etc?
 

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I just did this today on my motor. Everything said so far is correct. I chose to do each valve pair in the firing order rotating the crank 90 degrees each time. I put a piece of 1" masking tape around the balancer and cut it to fit just right. Then removed it and measured out 90 degree marks and reinstalled the tape. This way it was fast and easy to rotate to the right place. When you take up push rod slack make sure move it up and down until all slack is gone. Then go 1/2-3/4 turn more after that.

One thing to consider is if you have guide plates, now is the time to adjust/center them. My new heads from Edlebrock looked like a 3 year old aligned the plates. I re-aligned all of them (bring cyl to TDC loosen studs X2, install push rods, install rocker without nut, adjust plate to get best centering and torque it to 45 Ft.Lbs or whatever spec if for your heads). Then rockers go on and pre-load set. Easy and quite a rewarding step to complete!
 

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<style> <!-- /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:"Cambria Math"; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:3 0 0 0 1 0;} @font-face {font-family:Cambria; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-536870145 1073743103 0 0 415 0;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; mso-bidi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Cambria",serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:Cambria; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} .MsoChpDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; mso-default-props:yes; font-size:10.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; mso-bidi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Cambria",serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:Cambria; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} @Page WordSection1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.25in 1.0in 1.25in; mso-header-margin:.5in; mso-footer-margin:.5in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.WordSection1 {page:WordSection1;} --> </style> Adjust hydraulic valves with the engine cold.

Do this, and it will run smoothly, and likely with more power:


Disconnect the coil + wire.

Attach a bump switch to the solenoid, or just use a screwdriver.

Turn the engine so the #1 intake valve is fully opened. Loosen the exhaust valve until you can move the #1 exhaust valve pushrod up and down (NOT spinning).
Tighten this valve until no up and down movement can be felt, then tighten an additional 3/4 turn.


Note: Spinning the pushrod can cause a false adjustment, as a slowly collapsing lifter can allow the pushrod to spin freely, thus throwing off the base line of your adjustment.

Turn the engine so the #1 exhaust valve is fully opened. Loosen the intake valve until you can move the #1 intake valve pushrod up and down (again, NOT spinning).
Tighten this valve until no up and down movement can be felt, then tighten an additional 3/4 turn.

Repeat for the other 7 cylinders.

I did this on a friend’s engine that had been adjusted when built, then driven for several years. It was running OK, but not great, you could hear some valve noise. After doing the above, it did not seem to be much better immediately after adjustment, mostly because the lifters had been varnished into position by years of driving. Coupla miles around the block, though, and it was a whole 'nother engine.


Adjusting mechanical valves.

I drove a 289HP daily for 20 years, and every 6000 miles I adjusted the valves, which took less than an hour.

Adjusted properly, they aren't noisy, either, just a high-pitched singing sound.

Factory spec for the 289HP C3OZ-6250-C cam is .022" cold, .018" hot.

The procedure in the Manual is a bit complicated, and involves marking the balancer at 90° points, and then you follow some weird pattern, like I1, E4, I6, E2, or some complex crap. Takes an hour just to figure out what they want you to do.

Do this instead-

Run the engine until it is a full operating temperature. Disconnect the coil + wire.

Attach a bump switch to the solenoid, or just use a screwdriver.

Bump the starter until the second valve on the #1 cylinder is all the way open. This means the one closest to the radiator is closed, on the base circle of the cam lobe. Adjust the valve to .018".

Bump the starter until that valve is fully open, and adjust the second valve.

Continue to adjust the valves in pairs until the RH head is adjusted, and install the valve cover.

Repeat the process on the LH side of the engine. I like to start and run the engine to be sure it is still fully warmed up.

Remove the LH valve cover, and adjust the LH valves to .018".

Very quick, and very accurate.

If the engine has just been assembled, do the procedure cold, at .022”. Then warm up the engine and do it hot.
 

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What book do you have? I have the Monroe book. The procedure there is almost identical to one I saw on YouTube a few weeks ago. Basically, you get a cylinder at TDC on the compression stroke so you know both valves are fully closed and both lifters are on the cam base. Turn the adjusting nut for one rocker arm until you just take up all the slack movement in the pushrod, then tighten 3/4 turn more.

#1 at TDC on the compression stroke - Adjust #1, #7, and #8 intake and #1, #5, and #4 exhaust
Rotate the crank 180 degrees (1/2 turn) and adjust #4 and #5 intake, #2 and #6 exhaust
Rotate the crank 270 degrees (3/4 turn) and adjust #2, #3, and #6 intake and #7, #3, and #8 exhaust
I use this procedure from the Tom Monroe book and It works perfectly every time. You only have to turn the engine twice, much easier!
 

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Getting the exact 90° turn on the engine makes my head hurt. The procedure I posted can be done in less than an hour.
 

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Getting the exact 90° turn on the engine makes my head hurt. The procedure I posted can be done in less than an hour.
Pretty simple really, put a socket wrench on parallel to the ground, turn it til its perpendicular. Everyone has their way, I find this the easiest.

And also, how do you do your procedure with the engine on a stand? I get you can turn it by hand, but why do that 16 times?
 

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Socket and a ratchet or breaker bar on the balancer bolt lets you easily turn it 90, 180, 270 with no problem at all. In the car or out. It's easier with the plugs out, of course. On the other engine I regularly work on, you just turn the prop. :)
 

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On a new motor build while on an engine stand with no spark plugs it is so easy to rotate the crank 90 degrees at a time and get two valves per turn in firing order. If the motor was in the car all built up I think I like 22GTs way.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
What book do you have? I have the Monroe book. The procedure there is almost identical to one I saw on YouTube a few weeks ago. Basically, you get a cylinder at TDC on the compression stroke so you know both valves are fully closed and both lifters are on the cam base. Turn the adjusting nut for one rocker arm until you just take up all the slack movement in the pushrod, then tighten 3/4 turn more.

#1 at TDC on the compression stroke - Adjust #1, #7, and #8 intake and #1, #5, and #4 exhaust
Rotate the crank 180 degrees (1/2 turn) and adjust #4 and #5 intake, #2 and #6 exhaust
Rotate the crank 270 degrees (3/4 turn) and adjust #2, #3, and #6 intake and #7, #3, and #8 exhaust

I've never done it either, but it's pretty simple and the procedure makes sense.

The video said NOT to fill the lifters with oil. The Monroe book (which I have heard is good) says to prime them with oil. I'm not entirely sure it will make a difference... I haven't gotten far enough along to fully understand the way the lifters work internally, but it would seem that after a few seconds the oil in the lifter would be forced into the pushrod.
Well, oops. I primed the lifters with oil with a squirt gun (as directed by Tom Monroe-- I do have his book) before I installed them. Perhaps I was just tired yesterday; I'm looking at his instructions now and they don't seem so bad. Thanks for pitching in.

I, for one, have never "not" primed the lifters. Not sure the why "video" author stated "Not" to fill?
If using the adjustment process mentioned, It's very helpful to first, carefully, chalk mark the pulley every 90º. There are other methods that don't require this. One I've used, has you follow the firing order, starting with #1, then progressing through the F/O.
Which ever is easier to follow will be fine. But, the key is insuring the valve(s) is fully closed during the firing stroke in each case.
BTW, are you assembling a stock engine, that is stock heads, cam etc?
I did end up priming the lifters-- see above. Thanks for the advice on marking the pulley with chalk.
I am building a mild performance 289 for my driver. It's on the performance end of street, but not track. Cam card below:

camspecs.PNG
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I just did this today on my motor. Everything said so far is correct. I chose to do each valve pair in the firing order rotating the crank 90 degrees each time. I put a piece of 1" masking tape around the balancer and cut it to fit just right. Then removed it and measured out 90 degree marks and reinstalled the tape. This way it was fast and easy to rotate to the right place. When you take up push rod slack make sure move it up and down until all slack is gone. Then go 1/2-3/4 turn more after that.

One thing to consider is if you have guide plates, now is the time to adjust/center them. My new heads from Edlebrock looked like a 3 year old aligned the plates. I re-aligned all of them (bring cyl to TDC loosen studs X2, install push rods, install rocker without nut, adjust plate to get best centering and torque it to 45 Ft.Lbs or whatever spec if for your heads). Then rockers go on and pre-load set. Easy and quite a rewarding step to complete!
Thanks, this is helpful. I will probably end up using your masking tape method to ensure I get proper 90* turns!

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Do this, and it will run smoothly, and likely with more power:


Disconnect the coil + wire.

Attach a bump switch to the solenoid, or just use a screwdriver.

Turn the engine so the #1 intake valve is fully opened. Loosen the exhaust valve until you can move the #1 exhaust valve pushrod up and down (NOT spinning).
Tighten this valve until no up and down movement can be felt, then tighten an additional 3/4 turn.


Note: Spinning the pushrod can cause a false adjustment, as a slowly collapsing lifter can allow the pushrod to spin freely, thus throwing off the base line of your adjustment.

Turn the engine so the #1 exhaust valve is fully opened. Loosen the intake valve until you can move the #1 intake valve pushrod up and down (again, NOT spinning).
Tighten this valve until no up and down movement can be felt, then tighten an additional 3/4 turn.

Repeat for the other 7 cylinders.

I did this on a friend’s engine that had been adjusted when built, then driven for several years. It was running OK, but not great, you could hear some valve noise. After doing the above, it did not seem to be much better immediately after adjustment, mostly because the lifters had been varnished into position by years of driving. Coupla miles around the block, though, and it was a whole 'nother engine.


Adjusting mechanical valves.

I drove a 289HP daily for 20 years, and every 6000 miles I adjusted the valves, which took less than an hour.

Adjusted properly, they aren't noisy, either, just a high-pitched singing sound.

Factory spec for the 289HP C3OZ-6250-C cam is .022" cold, .018" hot.

The procedure in the Manual is a bit complicated, and involves marking the balancer at 90° points, and then you follow some weird pattern, like I1, E4, I6, E2, or some complex crap. Takes an hour just to figure out what they want you to do.

Do this instead-

Run the engine until it is a full operating temperature. Disconnect the coil + wire.

Attach a bump switch to the solenoid, or just use a screwdriver.

Bump the starter until the second valve on the #1 cylinder is all the way open. This means the one closest to the radiator is closed, on the base circle of the cam lobe. Adjust the valve to .018".

Bump the starter until that valve is fully open, and adjust the second valve.

Continue to adjust the valves in pairs until the RH head is adjusted, and install the valve cover.

Repeat the process on the LH side of the engine. I like to start and run the engine to be sure it is still fully warmed up.

Remove the LH valve cover, and adjust the LH valves to .018".

Very quick, and very accurate.

If the engine has just been assembled, do the procedure cold, at .022”. Then warm up the engine and do it hot.
Getting the exact 90° turn on the engine makes my head hurt. The procedure I posted can be done in less than an hour.
Thanks. I think I saw this somewhere doing some research last night??? Very detailed instructions, thank you for posting.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Socket and a ratchet or breaker bar on the balancer bolt lets you easily turn it 90, 180, 270 with no problem at all. In the car or out. It's easier with the plugs out, of course. On the other engine I regularly work on, you just turn the prop. :)
On a new motor build while on an engine stand with no spark plugs it is so easy to rotate the crank 90 degrees at a time and get two valves per turn in firing order. If the motor was in the car all built up I think I like 22GTs way.
Yeah, I think I'm going to do the 90 degree rotation method. Just seems to be more simple to me and it's what the book talks about.
 

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You using OEM type heads with your cam change? Are you aware of push rod geometry and the importance of adjusting for it, if it applies in your case? Not suggesting that it does, 'cause except for your cam change, we don't know the other details of your build.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
You using OEM type heads with your cam change? Are you aware of push rod geometry and the importance of adjusting for it, if it applies in your case? Not suggesting that it does, 'cause except for your cam change, we don't know the other details of your build.
New hypereutectic pistons as well. I think I mentioned earlier that I had all new lifters and pushrods, and a 4 barrel intake.

The heads are the original heads, but reconditioned. The only change is that we put some Chevy valves into them-- they're bigger and our machinist said it was a worthwhile upgrade. Does that change how I should be adjusting the valves?
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Okay guys, I found something.

It appears extremely simple and it's what I'm going to do.


He explains common methods of doing it in the first few minutes of the video, but he explains his method starting at about 8:30.

Input?
 

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289 valvetrain

Alex, you might be screwed. You should not put Chevy valves into your heads. Do you know what sizes he used ? Bigger Valves can be helpful, but the normal Chevy vaves are too short. If thats what you have, you may need new pushrods, rocker arms and thread in studs for the adjustable rockers. It is no bargain, and creates problems. Ask for what part number and what sizes did he use ? Do you have hard seats in the exhausts ? LSG
 
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