Vintage Mustang Forums banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part JUNE's Ride of the Month Challenge!
  • May's Ride of the Month contest ended with a tie! Go to this thread to vote on the winner! VOTE HERE
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,761 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
1) I am looking for information on the outer engine bay seam sealer locations for a 67 San Jose Fastback, at Jeff's request I am starting a new thread to avoid confusion.

2) Also do you have this information for the trunk area?

3) I also would like to know if the 3M Rubberized Undercoating that NPD claims is the closest thing out of a can is similar to the sound deadener that would have been applied in this area.

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,761 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Jeff - any major differences form the recent post? I plan on going over this with the painter next weekend so any tips would be greatly appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,807 Posts
Sorry will mark up a few examples (like I did for the other post) and post them tomorrow
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,807 Posts
In three responses

Front wheel well inner fender panel prep (before the black had been sprayed over the entire area) for very late San Jose built 1967's

By late 67 it appears that they didn't do the horizontal seams (as they did on some cars earlier) along the front frame rail to inner fender panels.


Pretty simple

- Along the rear inner fender panel to firewall

-Along the top of the footbox

Normally done with a tan colored sealer.And of course most of this is covered over much later with sound deadener. Can be small (just as it came from the end of a chalking gun or ugly and spread with a brush or rag.



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,807 Posts
GT_SCODE said:
2) Also do you have this information for the trunk area?

Details related to the sealant applied to the trunk seams prior to the application of paint

- first you have the seam sealer along the trunk opening lip. They used a light tan to smooth these seams (one at each end of the taillight panel to filler panels between quarter panel and taillight panel. In addition the two angled seams at the forward corners of the trunk opening.

- Often the same light colored chalk was applied to the seam between the wheel wells and trunk floor.

- Over the wheel well to trunk floor, the trunk floor (ahead of the gas tank) to trunk floor sides seams, two short seams at the bottom of the taillight panel to floor sides (Green Arrows) and to the inner surface of the quarter panels sound deadener was applied (REd arrows). In the first two areas this served to seal these seams and in the quarter panel application deadener the sounds that the uncoated panels might produce - often referred to as the oil drum effect

In addition the spray (though applied very heavy - 1/4" or more thick) was applied over the rear bumper supports (Yellow Arrow)





- Along the bottom edge of the taillight panel this seam was filled with chalking - or shot with the same sound deadener material (more cars were done with the spray on than the chalking this year.




At all of the seams that were sealed with what appears to be shot from a gun may instead have been chalked and spread - no real sign of overspray typically. What is more important IMHO as to how it was done is to correct reproduce the look.

The original material used for the spray sealing and sound deadener was likely asphalt based with some asbestos. Because of this the underlying material would alter the color of the exterior color that was sprayed over it when the color was one of the lighter ones.

Hope this helps
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,807 Posts
GT_SCODE said:
3) I also would like to know if the 3M Rubberized Undercoating that NPD claims is the closest thing out of a can is similar to the sound deadener that would have been applied in this area.

Now to how to get there. I wish I could be of more help here as currently I'm not pleased with any current products out there. Most of the rattle can and spray stuff is too thin (too much solvent) so it runs too much, dissolves the earlier coats making build up difficult and reduces the texture to almost nothing.

Years ago there was a great product that was sold through an individual. It was water based, but dried well and allowed for good build up (with the sagging curtain effect. A great by product was that it also turned light colored overspray like the original stuff.

Found some stuff the other day that I'm going to alter and use on the next car ... will see how it works.

As for currently some restorers are using roofing asphalt to do some of the seam areas (for the black not the tan). For tan 3M firm and fast works well in most climates but be careful of using it too thickly.

For sound deadener there is 3M or Wurth (with my preference being Wurth currently. But neither is great. If you using rattle cans then the nozzle seems to have allot to do with it (might consider cooling the cans first to increase the build up). And shake for a long time to get as much product suspended in the solvent,.

Used a can of Bondo brand rubber sound deadener and for what ever reason the stuff shot great for a while. Finished, small area I was patching on my Boss looked like the rest of the wheel well (was stripping off the original stuff to confirm the layering process).

In a resent application of 3M on one of the cars I was helping with the end product was way too flat (absorbed all the light) to the point where it looks like a flocked Christmas tree finish. Though it was thick enough IO had the owner go over it lightly with a 3M greeny pad to knock the rough surface off and produce a somewhat pebble finish like the original.

Hope this helps a little... but its going to take a bit of playing. Hopefully others can share what they have found useful

While we are on the subject... make sure the rear wheel well sound deadener is shot before you paint the car ;) with some overspray on the frame rail (forward and aft) as visible through the wheel well opening. Normally there were three of four passes of the wand (front to back normally)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,807 Posts
GT_SCODE said:
Jeff - I am not worthy!! Thanks for the excellent information! I truly appreciate the time you put into helping us all out.

Go out and help others my son LOL

Seriously - your welcome.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,807 Posts
Give me a day or two to organize a response/post. If I forget remind me please ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,807 Posts
GT_SCODE said:
Sorry to bug but one shot of the fender well seem sealer would be very helpful!!

Thanks!

I told you to remind me .... too easy with all my other things - to get distracted

OK here are the front wheel wells from a late 67 SAN JOSE cars.

Notes:

- As always the amount and where depended on the worker so any application can be found in "a little" or "allot" conditions

- Its difficult to determine the order of things since there are at least four stages and each one hides/ ereases information from the earlier one. SO the sound deadener (added last) sometimes becomes confused with an earlier application of seam sealer that was also sprayed on. IMHO focus on what the finished look should be then plan to get there by what ever method you choose.

Green tint indicates where I see a seam sealer applied in a thick manner. On the firewall/cowl section of the wheel well (not seams) the stuff was sprayed on a couple of the examples in a very heavy up and down or back and forth pattern

Purple tint indicates where I see sound deadener applied. We can discuss front wheel well sound deadener later if you wish

Hope this helps - will post the trunk and floor seam seal details (print the page for later reference - with all the pictures the server I use to post has limitations - there are 1000 pictures on it currently)

DRIVERS SIDE


















PASSENGER SIDE












 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,807 Posts
67 SAN JOSE TRUNK SEAM SEAL

Applied before the exterior color

Pattern appears to be pretty consistent though the a little/or allot rule still applies

The seam at the base of the taillight panel appears to be the biggest difference in application between workers


A little along the talilight panel edge


A lot



Other seams










 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top