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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I tried to do more on the 351W build but it seemed like everything I tried had a problem. The oil pump was wrong, the crank shaft hit it. Could not find my head bolts. While polishing some aluminum, I ran out of 600 grit paper.

I did install the guide plates and screw in studs. Anyone know what the screw in studs should be torque at?

How would ya’ll plug the side oil dip stick tube hole? Tap and plug or cut the dip stick tube and fill the tube with soldier and use it as a plug?

http://www.janschutz.com/Pictures/Engine1.JPG http://www.janschutz.com/Pictures/Engine2.JPG
 

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OMG the stripes on the springs line up LOL

The stud mfg has torque guidelines. The values depend on material and how they are installed (dry, certain lube, etc). I usually torque the ones in the race car to between 60-70 lb/ft. In OEM heads, the holes are sometimes open to coolant, so apply non-hardening sealer to the threads.

If you're talking about the dipstick hole in the timing cover, I just made a little plug out of delrin for it. There should be soft plugs available as well, like those used in oil galleries.

Too beautiful to run :)

Pat
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
camachinist said:
If you're talking about the dipstick hole in the timing cover, I just made a little plug out of delrin for it.
This is a 84 block with the dip stick hole on the driver's side of the block.

camachinist said:
Too beautiful to run :)
Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
camachinist said:
Can you accurately measure the hole?
I will do that tonight.
 

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I tapped mine and used a bolt to plug it. I applied thread sealant to the threads before I screwed it in.
 

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From a post the other day about the same question:

LMan said:
Ive used a tapered wooden dowel. Engine/oil heat will swell the wood and seal the hole.
 

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Unrelated, unrequested suggestion - measure the pushrod length and install the rockers to check for proper alignment before torquing the studs. I've never had an engine with factory heads where the guideplates were positioned properly to center the rockers on the valves (side to side). Maybe you've already done that?

Looks good
 

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67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
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About 10 years ago I ran into that problem when I got a used engine for my truck. I happened to have an old rear brake cylinder laying around. One of the steel pins (whatever they might be called) seemed about the right size. The ones that hang out each end and connect to the brake shoes. One end is forked and the other rounded like a bullet. After trial fitting, I used some LocTite 271 (red) and beat the bullet end carefully into the hole. Carefully because cast iron CAN be cracked by such action. The forked end stuck out and I ground it off flush. Seven years later the engine developed a knock and I rebuilt it after hot-tanking the block. The pin never did budge in the slightest. Worked for me.
I've heard simple piece of wooden dowel works but personally just can't see plugging a hole that sees hot oil with a porous material.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I just filled the oil dip stick hole in the block with high temp RTV, I will see if that holds.

I got the harden push rods in and installed the roller rockers (Sill need to do the final adjustment on them.
http://www.janschutz.com/Pictures/ABCurrentProject314.jpg

I started polishing the stainless bolts I bought for the timing cover and water pump.

http://www.janschutz.com/Pictures/ABCurrentProject315.jpg
 
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