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Discussion Starter #1
I have a part I want to get 3d printed and have no experience with 3d modeling. Are there any easy to use tools online that I can use to design a piece for printing? This is a blockoff plate I'm going to use so the under-dash AC box can be used for vents only.

Details here: Converting an old OEM under-dash AC unit to work as Vents for a newer AC system

I basically want to have this piece printed and where the dots are will be 2" OD ducts for the AC hose to connect to. I figure the ducts will protrude out 1 1/2" toward the back of the unit and about 1/2" out to the front side.

Here's what the plastic piece looks like sitting in the unit.


Any thoughts or ideas on an easy way to get this setup for printing?
 

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I use fusion 360. It is free for a year. I watched two 20 minutes videos and just trial and error. Not too bad

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SketchUp or Blender...... both have free versions. The model, below, was developed in SketchUp.
750616
 

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If you’re new to drafting or modeling the learning curve to get something usable can be steep. Fortunately your part is similar to an entry level training excercise and shouldn’t be too difficult as a first part. Once you get the basic jist of modeling, sketch, extrude, feature it shouldn’t be too difficult for you.

I’d suggest Sketchup or Fusion 360. Plenty of learning resources and community for both. My preference of the two is Fusion 360. I’ve been using it for several years now.

I looked at the part and didn’t grok the dims for the location of the ducts or overall part size else I would have drawn it. I could do a screen cast that shows the basic steps. (or even draw it with dims) A screencast feature is built into Fusion 360.

Printing the part may be more challenging. When we had the 3D printer manufacturing company the biggest I had was 16”x9”. I kept that and a couple of 8”x8” when we closed. Most consumer/prosumer printers are in the 8”x8” to 12”x 12” build envelope. There are some exceptions but that’s the neighborhood. Commercial machines can be much larger. Depending on the machine you may have to print it in sections then join them when you’re done. Or you could cut the flat piece by hand, hole saw where the ducts will be and print the ducts and glue them in.

Here’s what it could look like...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the tips. I've been playing around with TinkerCad today, but having a hard time figuring out how to get measurements and put pieces right where I need them. I'll try the Fusion one and mess around with it. If I can get it close, maybe I can email the file to you and tell you what part I'm having a problem with.

I could probably use a hole saw and some PVC pipe to make the part, but I thought if I did this as a printed piece, others could use this part if they wanted to adapt an underdash unit to vents only. The vents that come with the aftermarket AC kits are really cheesy looking and I think using the vintage housing looks better.
 
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