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I am going to a local yard with approx 20 dead mustangs I am looking for a 4 speed pedal assembly for future swap. what pieces do I need to get from under the dash besides the clutch/brake assembly for the swap, and any special tools needed to remove thanks
 

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You should be able to to the work with a set of socket wrenches, and perhaps a screwdriver for the handbrake bracket. You should know the bracket itself is the same,for manual or automatic, and the pedals, small brackets, and assist spring are added to the plain bracket.

To get the whole thing out in one piece, the steering column needs to be removed first.

Mustang Clutch Assist Spring Removal and Installation
 

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I pick up Auto supports also because they will most likely not have the blown out pot metal bushings like the manual units.
 

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I have done this swap a few times and generally find that the original automatic support assembly is in much better shape than the 3 and 4-speed supports (a lot more force is applied to the manual supports via the assist spring and frequent shifting so they tend to be tweaked and have worn out openings). So I just take the pedals, assist spring and bracket, and clutch pedal stop and put them on the automatic support.

BTW, if you are going to use a diaphragm clutch (and why wouldn't you?), you don't really need the big spring and bracket anyway. So you can just get the pedals and clutch pedal stop.

Don't forget to buy new plastic bushings and little white spring insulators (if needed)when you put everything back together.

Good luck,
MrFreeze
 

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Of course, you can get the bracket new, too.

 

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I have done this swap a few times and generally find that the original automatic support assembly is in much better shape than the 3 and 4-speed supports (a lot more force is applied to the manual supports via the assist spring and frequent shifting so they tend to be tweaked and have worn out openings). So I just take the pedals, assist spring and bracket, and clutch pedal stop and put them on the automatic support.

BTW, if you are going to use a diaphragm clutch (and why wouldn't you?), you don't really need the big spring and bracket anyway. So you can just get the pedals and clutch pedal stop.

Don't forget to buy new plastic bushings and little white spring insulators (if needed)when you put everything back together.

Good luck,
MrFreeze
Ditto on what MrFreeze said. I just got done doing a 4 speed swap on my 66. You can re use your existing hanger. I left the big spring off for exactly the same reason, I'm runing a diaphragm clutch. I would suggest getting a spare hanger anyway and getting mustangsteve.com to add roller bearings to make the clutch pedal work smoother and last! Here's mine






I also made new linkage up using spherical ends to make the rest of the system work smoothly....and it does!




The big spring looks intiminating to remove or install but it's actually fairly easy if you do it right. Just remove the retaining clip on the shaft, while holding the pedal, just tap it out gently untill the pedal clears the bump stop, then just release the spring tension. Do the same to install. Very easy!
 

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Getting the pedal support out is very difficult and time consuming. Not something I would want to do in a junkyard. And the pedal bushings are probably eaten up. IMO just save the time/trouble and get a new one.

Getting the pedals out is not very difficult.
 

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Getting the pedal support out is very difficult and time consuming. Not something I would want to do in a junkyard. And the pedal bushings are probably eaten up. IMO just save the time/trouble and get a new one.

Getting the pedals out is not very difficult.
Having done it, I agree. Of course, you couldn't get new ones then. As for the bracket, I'd convert to roller, either with the snap-in Drake kit, or the more involved welded-in conversion.
 

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Just an added comment. Agree with the rest. Also the handbrake bracket removal can be a SOB! That innocent looking large phillips screw/bolt on my 68 was easy to get at but wouldn't budge. Finally got it loose but just this one bolt/screw would have been bad in a junk yard! Yes been auto yard scavanging since 1956, not a let someone else do it person!
 

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If your going from auto to manual, you can just cut the brake peddle to fit a new smaller
brake pad. Then you don't need to take out the bracket or even mess with the brakes or steering column.
Just install the clutch peddle in the bracket (providing that the existing bracket is still good).
 

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BTW, if you are going to use a diaphragm clutch (and why wouldn't you?)…
Well, the OEM 10.5" C7ZZ BOSS 302/289 High Performance clutch was semi-centrifugal, which means the higher the rpm, the better the clutch gripped. Diaphram clutches don't do this.
 

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Well, the OEM 10.5" C7ZZ BOSS 302/289 High Performance clutch was semi-centrifugal, which means the higher the rpm, the better the clutch gripped. Diaphram clutches don't do this.
I didn't know that about the Boss clutch. But my diaphragm clutch has never slipped at any rpm my moderately built 302HO coupe has reached, and it engages much nicer than the 3-finger clutch I will soon be replacing on my fastback. Unless you expect a lot of high-rpm operation, I still think the diaphragm clutch is the way to go.

Just my opinion...

MrFreeze
 

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Smoothness has never been an issue for me, my BOSS clutch works just fine.

See the three little weights (one at the extreme top of the picture)? Those, and the shape of the lever, cause pressure on the plate to increase as rpm increases.

 

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There are diaphragm clutches out there that can take any kind of abuse you can throw at them. Try a Centerforce dual friction.
 
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