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Mine is recessed, has one valve inlet eyebrow, and stamped TRW inside, can't find any photos except mine, I SEE ONES NO RECESS, 1 INLET, RECESS 2 INLET?
 

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I don't know the answer to your question... But I think I know that 1970 was the first year for the 429SCJ.. And 1971 was the only year it was available in a Mustang.
 

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429 SCJ 69 and 70, remember seeing a 69 at auto dealer, Torino? anyway I have TRW pistons standard,
 

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429 SCJ 69 and 70, remember seeing a 69 at auto dealer, Torino? anyway I have TRW pistons standard,
Nope, 1969 Torino/Fairlane came with the FE 428SCJ... I know, because I owned a Q-code SCJ Cobra.

It wasn't until 1970 that the Torino switched to the 385-series 429. Absolutely-positively.
 

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Nope, 1969 Torino/Fairlane came with the FE 428SCJ... I know, because I owned a Q-code SCJ Cobra.

It wasn't until 1970 that the Torino switched to the 385-series 429. Absolutely-positively.
Check 69 429 BOSS/Jay Leno garage--I rest my case
 

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Introduced in 1968, Ford's 385-series V-8s replaced the tried-and-true FE-series big-block engines in passenger cars by 1970. Designed before the famous “Cleveland" small block, it was Ford's first V-8 that used canted-valve "poly-angle" cylinder heads, very similar to those used on Chevrolet's big-block engine. Valves are canted in two planes relative to the cylinder's centerline to facilitate flow, and also for more subtle purposes. Several more advantages were achieved by this canting. The tilted valves cause the heads to open obliquely into the combustion chamber, away from any shrouding effect that might be caused by the adjacent cylinder walls.
Both intake and exhaust valves tilt off the centerline in the longitudinal plane, the intake being 5 degrees off vertical and the exhaust 4 degrees & 30 minutes off in the opposite direction. They also tilt in the lateral plane, with the intake about 13 degrees and the exhaust about 16 degrees toward the center of the engine. The angled stems also created more space in the head for the round passages by splaying out the pushrod angles. It also gave designers the chance to move coolant passages closer to the valve stems, thus giving them better reliability and durability. Exhaust manifolds for the base 429 and 460 engines were made of cast iron and exit at the rear of the engine.
Thogh similar in head design and approach, the 385-series engines were not a larger version of the Boss 302/351. The 385's heads are an enhancement of the famous Chevrolet Big Block, but more refined than the Chevy's. This is because the engineers had the advantage of seeing any flaws in the "Rat" and thus were designed to have equally spaced runners for better fuel mixture distribution.
The 385 Series engines were delivered in two displacements for its entire life - 428 and 460 CID. A 370 CID version was produced for light duty trucks and had a 4.050" bore and the 429's 3.59" stroke, but was otherwise the same as the base 429.
The 429 CID version was the performance block, due to NASCAR's 7 liter (maximum engine size) rule. Two major criteria influenced block design: light weight and small package size commensurate with strength, and size to take care of any subsequent increase in displacement. The thin-wall, skirtless engine block that had the same oiling system that was the result of racing experience and it was also later used on the 302-351 Cleveland engines.
The 429-460 is low in deck height, being only 10.3" from crankshaft centerline to cylinder head mating surface. This is notably lower and narrower in overall dimension than its two predecessors - the FE 332-428 CID and the MEL 410-430 CID. Overall weight was reduced by 60 pounds from the MEL, but by only about 20 pounds from he FE. The lower deck height allowed fitment in almost all of the Ford models, where the MEL was restriced to the Lincoln and the FE used very restricive exhaust mnifolds. Block deck height was increased 0.010” in 1971-72, and again in 1973 by 0.012” to lower compression without changing the heads.
Both engines had the same 4.36” bore; the 429 CID version utilized a surprisingly short stroke of 3.59”; not much greater than the 351 CID Cleveland’s 3.50”. This relatively short stroke built in a, high-rpm capability into the 429 version of the 385 series. The 460 CID version used a stroke of 3.85”.
The nodular iron crankshaft runs in five generously sized main bearings, 3.00" diameter by .945" in length. The center main is machined to take drive thrust. Connecting rod journals are 2.50" diameter and the rods have a new strap-type of cap which gives greater strength with less weight.

BASE 429
The 429 “Thunder Jet 429” was first used on Ford's Thunderbird in 1968. The 460 CID version first saw service on the 1968 Lincoln but was unnamed and merely called "460 CID". The base 429 CID version was used as the optional big block engine on Ford and Mercury full-size cars from 1968 to 1973 and on intermediates from 1970 to 1973. The exception was the Mustang Boss 429 which received the special version of the 385 Series for 1969 and 1970. All base 429 engines used the regular two-bolt main-bearing cap engine block, cast-iron crankshaft, forged-steel connecting rods with 3/8-inch rod bolts, and cast-aluminum pistons.
The base 429 and 460 engines came with a hydraulic-lifter camshaft, "small-port" heads, and “small” valves in relation to the 429 CJ, SCJ and Boss 429s. The base 429 valves were 2.08” intakes and 1.66“ exhausts. The cylinder heads featured non-adjustable rail-type rocker arms, a cast-iron intake manifold, and a either a 2 or a 4-barrel Ford Autolite carburetor. All other 429 and 460 engines besides the CJ and SCJ versions came with stamped-steel valve covers.
In 1968, the 429 V-8 was considered the premium engine and was available only with a four-barrel carburetor and was rated at 360 horsepower. This version of the engine was offered virtually unchanged through the 1971 model year in various Ford and Mercury full-size and intermediate cars. The four-barrel engine featured compression ratios between 10.5 and 11.0:1 from 1968 to 1970. This was standardized at 10.5:1 in 1971, then to 8.5:1 in 1972 and further reduced to 8.0:1 in 1973. The 4-barrel 429 V-8 was available in, 1972 and 1973, and because Ford used the SAE net method to determine horsepower, output was rated between 197 and 208 depending on application; however it was little changed from the 1971 version.
A 2-barrel carbureted version from 1969 through 1971. The two-barrel carburetor engine had the same high compression ratio as the 4-barrel - 10.5:1. The two-barrel version was rated at 320 horsepower.
Not commonly known is that Ford used the big-valve, big-port Cobra Jet (CJ) heads on the 1972-1974 429 and 460 PI (Police Interceptor) engines. But they did not have adjustable rocker arms. The heads were also cast with larger combustion chambers to reduce compression ratios to 8.8:1.


COBRA JET AND SUPER COBRA JET 429
Like the FE 428 before it, the 429 also received the famous “Cobra Jet” option. Two versions were made, the 429 CJ and the 429 SCJ (Super Cobra Jet). Both were available during 1970-1971 on Ford and Mercury performance intermediates and the Ford Mustang and Mercury Cougar.
The 1971 CJ and the 1970-1971 SCJ used a four-bolt-main engine block, however the 1970 429 CID CJ engine only used the base two-bolt-main engine block. The four-bolt main-bearing caps were used in the 2, 3, and 4 positions. All CJ and SCJ 429s came with a cast-iron crankshaft and the standard 429 CID connecting rods. The CJ engines were fitted with cast-aluminum pistons and the SCJ got forged-aluminum pistons. Compression ratio on both engines was 11.3:1.
The big difference between the base 429 and the 429 CJ and SCJ was the cylinder heads. The ports on the CJ and SCJ engines were considerably larger than the base 429, as were the valves. CJ and SCJ engines featured 2.25” intakes and 1.72” exhausts. The CJ engine used a hydraulic-lifter camshaft, while the SCJ used a mechanical-lifter version. Both engines used stamped-steel 1.73:1-ratio rocker arms on sled-type fulcrums, with threaded screw-in rocker studs and pushrod guide plates. The rockers on the SCJ engines were adjustable, and so were those of CJ engines built before November 1, 1969. Later CJ engines used screw-in, positive-stop rocker studs, which were nonadjustable. The CJ and SCJ engines came with aluminum valve covers.
There was a difference between the intake manifolds and carburetors on the CJ and SCJ. The CJ engines used a Rochester Quadrajet carburetor mounted on a spread-bore cast-iron intake manifold; the SCJ engine used a similar intake manifold but was set up for a Holley 780-cfm four-barrel carburetor and had Holley ports and bolt pattern. The CJ and SCJ exhaust manifolds are cast iron, but are much more free-flowing and have larger outlets.

BOSS 429
The Boss 429 was the ultimate 429 V8. It was fitted to Boss 429 Mustangs so that Ford could use the engine in NASCAR. NASCAR’s rules at the time stated that the engine had to be installed in at least 500 street cars, and Ford chose to install the engine in the 1969-1970 Boss 429 Mustang rather than the intermediate they were using in racing, some say in response to the famous L-72 COPO Camaros and Hemi ‘Cudas.
One can easily see that the Boss engine is radically different from all other 429s. The cylinder heads are massive but are cast in aluminum to reduce engine weight. Since it was intended for NASCAR, the engine was designed to run at high rpm for extended periods of time, so Ford made sure that every component of the engine could withstand the punishment. In NASCAR racing, it was as reliable as Ford's venerable 427 “Side Oiler” FE series. Although the engine used in the Boss 429 Mustang resembled the NASCAR 429 race version, there were quite a few differences between the two engines.
The aluminum Boss 429 cylinder heads used a modified hemispherical combustion chamber. Ford called these unique chambers, "crescent chambers”. They were a shallow but clearly of hemispherical design, however, the sides were filled in to increase the compression ratio. The valves were huge and located transversely – in a typical hemi cross-flow configuration. The street engine had 2.28” intake and 1.90” exhaust valves. The intake ports were round, but the large exhaust ports were D shaped.
The cylinder heads did not use conventional head gaskets for sealing to the block. Each water and oil passage on the heads was completely round and made to accept rubber Viton 0-rings. As such, there was a machined 0-ring groove around the passages and around each cylinder for use with special copper sealing rings. This was deemed necessary because the engine used only 10 bolts to secure the cylinder head on the block. The engine used individual shaft-mounted rockers with a 1.76:1 ratio for the exhaust rockers and 1.65:1 for the intakes.
The engine block used on the Boss 429 engines was also different from other 429 CID blocks. There was a cast-in “429-horsepower” on the left front of the block. Internally, four-bolt main-bearing caps were used on the numbers 1, 2, 3, and 4 positions, and the Boss blocks had a revised oiling system that had four oil galleries, whereas the regular 429 block had only two.
There were two pedestals in the Boss 429 block's lifter gallery area as opposed to one in the standard block. The cylinder walls on these blocks were much thicker than those of regular production blocks. Boss blocks could be over-bored 0.160”, according to Holman Moody. They were also cast with higher nodular iron content.
There were two versions of the street Boss 429 engine, the “820-S” and “820-T”, as identified by the engine identification tag mounted underneath the coil. The S version, used only on early 1969 production Boss 429 Mustangs, had much stronger connecting rods with 1/2-inch 12-point rod bolts. These rods were 6.549“ long. The T version used rods that were the same length as the regular 429 rods but stronger.
Both 1969 engines used a hydraulic-lifter camshaft and both had forged-aluminum pistons, forged-steel cross-drilled crankshafts, and a 10.5:1 compression ratio. The 1970 version of the T engine came with the mechanical camshaft used in the 429 SCJ. Both engines used distinctive aluminum valve covers.
All street Boss 429s came with an aluminum dual-plane, a high-rise type of intake manifold, and a 735-cfm Holley four-barrel carburetor. The cast-iron exhaust manifolds of the Boss 429 were also unique, made to fit within the tight confines of the Mustang engine compartment.

NASCAR 429
There was no "set" NASCAR 429 engine configuration, but these engines generally shared certain characteristics that made them different from the street engines, and these changed based on the requirements of each track and as the engine developed. Tuners such as Holman Moody tweaked the configurations to meet differing track conditions and Ford supplied parts and pieces not ever found in the street engines. Many times the tuners would develop a part and Ford would merely give it a factory number to ensure NASCAR's approval.
The NASCAR engine blocks were different from the street Boss. They had larger outboard bolts in the number one main-bearing cap, and the block's deck was grooved for the 0-rings. The blocks also had larger machined reliefs for the exhaust pushrods. The crankshaft of the NASCAR engines was forged steel. The rods were similar to the street S rods but longer. Several types were made, and one even had an oil passage running through its center to bring oil up to the piston pin.
The cylinder heads were either of the crescent type or the full Hemi design. The intake valves, usually stainless steel, were larger on the race engines, measuring 2.37”. The rocker arms rotated on thinner shafts, and the intake valve rockers had a 1.75:1 ratio. The race engines also used lighter, magnesium valve covers.
There was a great variety of intake manifolds for the race engine—some cast in aluminum and some in magnesium. Unlike the street intake manifold, these did not have provision for a thermostat and water outlet; the race engines used a special water manifold that connected the cylinder heads.
The ultimate configuration of the race Boss engine was the all-aluminum block (and in fact, some magnesium blocks were also cast). These were used in Ford's abbreviated Can Am race effort. The block used cast-iron liners bored out to 4.54”. With the 460's 3.85” stroke, the result was 494 CID.

 

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Check 69 429 BOSS/Jay Leno garage--I rest my case
What case? The 429 Boss is not a Cobra Jet by any stretch of means. As to the CJ/SCJ they didn’t come in cars until the 70 model year.
As to your pistons, it’s been a while but I think TRW made the forgings for the SCJ version of the engine, I think the regular CJ just got cast pistons but I could be wrong about that. At any rate sounds like you have something cool on your hands.....what’s it going in or already in?
 

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Check 69 429 BOSS/Jay Leno garage--I rest my case
A Boss 429 is NOT a 429 CJ or 429 SCJ... As is explained in heavy detail above.

I happen to own a 1969 Boss 429 as well. So I don't need to view Leno's video, I have one sitting about 150 feet from me.

Again, the first year for the 429CJ and SCJ (the Boss 429 was Ford's semi-hemi headed NASCAR engine, and quite a different animal) was 1970, available in the Torino and Montego. 1971 was the first year it became available in the Mustang and Cougar.

There are many extremely experienced and knowledgeable members here on this forum, you'll find it to be a deep well of good advice and information.

We're here to help.
 

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Mike ,
The original '70 429 CJ and SCJ used a flat top single relief , forged TRW piston. They used the same heads but the CJ used a hydraulic cam and Quadra Jet carb. The SCJ used a solid lifter cam and Holley 780. Both were first released in '70 model year Torinos. It became available in Mustangs for '71.The piston should have a DOOE 6108 part number stamped on the top.
 
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