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Discussion Starter #1
I'm currently researching what would be needed to put a 460 cubic inch engine in my 69 fastback. I don't have much experience with engine work, so any help is appreciated. Is a 460 block better than a 429 block? I've heard that they're basically the same block, but that the crankshafts are different (obviously more displacement in the 460). Also, I've read that 429 heads will work on a 460 block. Any truth to that? Finally, would there be any cutting of the shock towers or any other modifications to the engine bay in order to fit said engine? I'm sure these questions have been asked before, and I'm also sure I sound like an idiot asking them. Thanks everyone.
 

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Theres a company that makes a kit to put a 429/460 in a 67-70 mustang. The 429/460 blocks will interchange. The heads will interchange. The intakes will interchange. The connecting rods are the same. The piston pin locations are different and will not interchange. The cranks are different and will not interchange. A 2 bolt main 429/460 block is plenty strong for a street engine.
 

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I'm currently researching what would be needed to put a 460 cubic inch engine in my 69 fastback. I don't have much experience with engine work, so any help is appreciated. Is a 460 block better than a 429 block? I've heard that they're basically the same block, but that the crankshafts are different (obviously more displacement in the 460). Also, I've read that 429 heads will work on a 460 block. Any truth to that? Finally, would there be any cutting of the shock towers or any other modifications to the engine bay in order to fit said engine? I'm sure these questions have been asked before, and I'm also sure I sound like an idiot asking them. Thanks everyone.
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/429-460Stangs/info
 

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I'm currently researching what would be needed to put a 460 cubic inch engine in my 69 fastback. I don't have much experience with engine work, so any help is appreciated. Is a 460 block better than a 429 block? I've heard that they're basically the same block, but that the crankshafts are different (obviously more displacement in the 460). Also, I've read that 429 heads will work on a 460 block. Any truth to that? Finally, would there be any cutting of the shock towers or any other modifications to the engine bay in order to fit said engine? I'm sure these questions have been asked before, and I'm also sure I sound like an idiot asking them. Thanks everyone.
Welcome to the board. They're the same series, just stroked.

460

Produced from 1968 to 1996.
Available in Ford, Mercury and Lincoln.
Same as 429, but with longer stroke. (3.85 inch)
During its earlier years, pre 1973, horsepower was rated at 365. After 1972 horsepower ranged from 208 to 275.
Intake/exhaust valves are 2.08/1.66
Intake/exhaust valves for the Police Interceptor 460 heads (from 1973-’74) measure 2.19/1.66
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks everyone for the input. I'm gonna go with the 460 block more than likely, since I've found quite a few for only a few hundred bucks.
 

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Thanks everyone for the input. I'm gonna go with the 460 block more than likely, since I've found quite a few for only a few hundred bucks.
The 460 is a tired engine best suited for a truck or fullsize car...It is not a performer at all!
The weight and dimensions is a problem for the 69 engine bay and even if you get it it it will be a pain when you need to work on it

You will also get problem with the front brakes that will need to work more than they are designed for.
Also there are often a C6 transmission wish also is a slow tranny that robs a lot of horsepower.

Go for a regular 351 is my recommendation.
 

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The 460 is a tired engine best suited for a truck or fullsize car...It is not a performer at all!
The weight and dimensions is a problem for the 69 engine bay and even if you get it it it will be a pain when you need to work on it

You will also get problem with the front brakes that will need to work more than they are designed for.
Also there are often a C6 transmission wish also is a slow tranny that robs a lot of horsepower.

Go for a regular 351 is my recommendation.

Not so,....a 460 will produce more power than you can handle at a much lower rpm. How about a Very easy 500/500 hp tq turning at a comfortable 5,400 rpm? :surprise:

Stroke that baby, 502/557, and now you're really getting scary.

The 69's easily handle the 429/460 as far as size, they were made for this.
 

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Not so,....a 460 will produce more power than you can handle at a much lower rpm. How about a Very easy 500/500 hp tq turning at a comfortable 5,400 rpm? :surprise:

Stroke that baby, 502/557, and now you're really getting scary.

The 69's easily handle the 429/460 as far as size, they were made for this.
Sorry I have seen lots of build with 460 and it is almost a terrible result.....It is not only a "power" issue
The front end cant handle it as simple as that if you don't replace to aluminum parts in the engine and it will cost you.
500hp feels like only 300 when it reach the asphalt.
The C6 eats up a second with its huge internal rotating mass.

It simply is a waste of time and money and something folks did in the 70's...Todays winsor strokers is the easy way to go and the Mustang performs overall better with lighter load.

If you want to bury money to a stroked 502/557 you could likewise drop in a Chevy LS7 and really make power
 

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I agree with above ...unless want the underhood eye candy of a big block or more than 427 CIs a stroker 351w is the best of both worlds.

Big block cubes in a small block package..
 

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Sorry I have seen lots of build with 460 and it is almost a terrible result.....It is not only a "power" issue
The front end cant handle it as simple as that if you don't replace to aluminum parts in the engine and it will cost you.
500hp feels like only 300 when it reach the asphalt.
The C6 eats up a second with its huge internal rotating mass.

It simply is a waste of time and money and something folks did in the 70's...Todays winsor strokers is the easy way to go and the Mustang performs overall better with lighter load.

If you want to bury money to a stroked 502/557 you could likewise drop in a Chevy LS7 and really make power

We'll agree to disagree.
 

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Per,
You may simply lack the talent in your country to build a high horsepower 460 and a reliable C6. Sure a 460 is heavy but so is a "talldeck" big block Chevy. Both can be built to 632ci with an aftermarket block and make similar power.
 

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fact vs fiction

I don't know if some people speak as if they are an authority on something they have no actual experience with, but I'll offer some facts rather than just an opinion. FACT: I have had a 385 series engine in my 67 since 1990. FACT: The car has been driven in 18 states and year round. FACT: I have done the HRPT 5 times with the car (about 3,000 miles in a week round trip in June driving in traffic and the heat). FACT: I have done two open track events (Nashville Speedway) with it and run it on the drag strip. Up until about a year ago it was a 1970 iron head (D0VE-C) 429 with a C6. The car has Granada spindles (also since the 90's), OPR roller perches and idler arm. The Arning drop, 620lb springs, an added passenger side torque box (was originally a 289 car and didn't have one), it has welded in sub-frame connectors and a repop export brace. FACT: The car handles great considering it is nose heavy. But it still handles great. FACT: I don't have any concerns throwing it into a corner at speed, going over RR tracks, pot holes or panic braking if needed and taking on-ramps well over the posted limit is no problem. FACT: I drive this car anywhere. It was a PS car but in the 90's with the old crossover headers I had to remove the PS. A few years ago I did upgrade to EPAS which made it much more fun to drive. I also tossed the old headers in favor of some FPA shorty headers. I built the engine on a budget many many years ago and it was a stock bore 429. I recently pulled the engine and had it bored .030" over, put a SCAT crank in it making it a 502. I added the Eddelbrock RPM heads which use the standard ports vs the SCJ so I could use my FPA headers. FACT: I ran the engine on the dyno with the FPA headers, and everything on it that will be in the car with 93 octane pump gas and it made 615hp @ 6K and 628 lb ft of torque @ 4200 rpm with a very broad and flat torque curve. I am converting it to a TKO 600 at this time because I like to shift but naysayers of the 385 series engine and C6 that don't have actual experience should be ignored. I can attest to the the strength, durability and smiles per gallon that I have enjoyed in nearly 30 years with this combo. FACT: I never dyno'd the basically stock 429 (218 @.050" duration and .500" lift cam, Edelbrock Performer 460 intake and 750 Holley carb) but it would run 12's in the 1/4 on pump gas with 3.25 gears and stock stall converter. The car weighed 3400 with me and fuel in it at the track. Full interior and stereo and trunk loaded with a spare tire and jack, etc. With the aluminum heads I have shaved at least 60 lbs off the nose, I also added an aluminum radiator and water pump so maybe shed a couple more pounds and it definitely has more power now! So I'll keep my truck engine. I fully expect to be deep into the 11's and maybe get kicked off the track since I can't run faster than 11.49 without a cage. I will need some slicks though, the 429 ran 12's spinning the tires and had a lousy 60 foot. Don't get me wrong, I have nothing against a Windsor or Cleveland but I only spent about $5000 on my 429 (cam, heads, rotating assembly, etc.) to make over 600 hp and over 600 lb ft of torque and it's still a very mild build that will be reliable and streetable. FACT: The car has no trouble being street driven, hasn't cracked or tweaked the body, and has been safe and fun to drive with a big block in for nearly 30 years. That is all fact, not an opinion... Now could a small block car have a few tenth quicker lap times? maybe, Can you make over 600hp from an LS engine? yep. Now based on those facts, here is my opinion, there is absolutely NOTHING wrong with a big block Ford!!!
 

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Post your progress on the trans swap, I’d like to follow.
 

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I don't know if some people speak as if they are an authority on something they have no actual experience with, but I'll offer some facts rather than just an opinion. FACT: I have had a 385 series engine in my 67 since 1990. FACT: The car has been driven in 18 states and year round. FACT: I have done the HRPT 5 times with the car (about 3,000 miles in a week round trip in June driving in traffic and the heat). FACT: I have done two open track events (Nashville Speedway) with it and run it on the drag strip. Up until about a year ago it was a 1970 iron head (D0VE-C) 429 with a C6. The car has Granada spindles (also since the 90's), OPR roller perches and idler arm. The Arning drop, 620lb springs, an added passenger side torque box (was originally a 289 car and didn't have one), it has welded in sub-frame connectors and a repop export brace. FACT: The car handles great considering it is nose heavy. But it still handles great. FACT: I don't have any concerns throwing it into a corner at speed, going over RR tracks, pot holes or panic braking if needed and taking on-ramps well over the posted limit is no problem. FACT: I drive this car anywhere. It was a PS car but in the 90's with the old crossover headers I had to remove the PS. A few years ago I did upgrade to EPAS which made it much more fun to drive. I also tossed the old headers in favor of some FPA shorty headers. I built the engine on a budget many many years ago and it was a stock bore 429. I recently pulled the engine and had it bored .030" over, put a SCAT crank in it making it a 502. I added the Eddelbrock RPM heads which use the standard ports vs the SCJ so I could use my FPA headers. FACT: I ran the engine on the dyno with the FPA headers, and everything on it that will be in the car with 93 octane pump gas and it made 615hp @ 6K and 628 lb ft of torque @ 4200 rpm with a very broad and flat torque curve. I am converting it to a TKO 600 at this time because I like to shift but naysayers of the 385 series engine and C6 that don't have actual experience should be ignored. I can attest to the the strength, durability and smiles per gallon that I have enjoyed in nearly 30 years with this combo. FACT: I never dyno'd the basically stock 429 (218 @.050" duration and .500" lift cam, Edelbrock Performer 460 intake and 750 Holley carb) but it would run 12's in the 1/4 on pump gas with 3.25 gears and stock stall converter. The car weighed 3400 with me and fuel in it at the track. Full interior and stereo and trunk loaded with a spare tire and jack, etc. With the aluminum heads I have shaved at least 60 lbs off the nose, I also added an aluminum radiator and water pump so maybe shed a couple more pounds and it definitely has more power now! So I'll keep my truck engine. I fully expect to be deep into the 11's and maybe get kicked off the track since I can't run faster than 11.49 without a cage. I will need some slicks though, the 429 ran 12's spinning the tires and had a lousy 60 foot. Don't get me wrong, I have nothing against a Windsor or Cleveland but I only spent about $5000 on my 429 (cam, heads, rotating assembly, etc.) to make over 600 hp and over 600 lb ft of torque and it's still a very mild build that will be reliable and streetable. FACT: The car has no trouble being street driven, hasn't cracked or tweaked the body, and has been safe and fun to drive with a big block in for nearly 30 years. That is all fact, not an opinion... Now could a small block car have a few tenth quicker lap times? maybe, Can you make over 600hp from an LS engine? yep. Now based on those facts, here is my opinion, there is absolutely NOTHING wrong with a big block Ford!!!
That thing sounds like fun and one better respect how much torque that thing has or you could get in trouble quickly. Like to see pics of engine compartment if you have any.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

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I wrote this back on 2003, but the bulk of it is still valid. I have changed a few things like carb & valve covers but the bulk of it is still the same.


This post describes how I installed a 460 in my 69 Cougar without cutting it all up. Hopefully it will be of some help to those of you who are considering this swap.

<big><big>Installing a Lima (429/460) engine into a 67-70 Cougar</big></big>

<hr width="95%" size="1">

Dropping a 429 or a 460 into an early Cougar (or Mustang) seems to be becoming more popular, and I know that when I did mine there was not a whole lot of information available, so I figured that I would share my experiences with you here.



First of all, I want to say that contrary to what the purists and naysayers preach, the swap is possible, it is affordable, they don’t overheat, they are streetable, can have factory power steering and power brakes, and it can be done as a bolt in conversion. My 1969 Mercury Cougar XR7 is rolling proof of that. Keep in mind that this car was built as a driver with stops at local show and shines and an occasional run at the drag strip so what you have to do to your particular car may differ. As I said, this was to be a drop in bolt in project. I can drop a 351W back into this car and no
one will ever know that it ever had a 460 in it.



These cars came with FE (390/427/428) engines from the factory. The Lima and FE are the same width. The widest part simply falls in a different spot. The Lima is longer though and this causes some clearance issues at the radiator. The Lima is also taller than the FE and the FE is certainly easier to change the sparkplugs in.



However, the Lima makes TONS of stump pulling torque at a very low RPM and a stock rotating assembly is good for 6000 RPM anyway. A Lima engine is cheaper, easier to find parts for and a hell of a lot better looking too (IMHO). So, here we go….



<hr width="95%" size="1">
<big>Get your <s> </s><s>s***</s> stuff together</big><big>

</big>


Before you start ripping and tearing it’s a good idea to get your plan and parts together. There are several vendors that offer conversion kits to do this. Crites Restoration and MPG Head Service are a couple. I used the Crites mounts in my conversion and they use Boss429 style frame mounts and insulators, which raise the engine approximately one inch. They also bring the motor forward about 1”. From what I hear the MPG
set up does not do either of these, but is not a bolt in kit.

Both Crites and MPG offer complete kits with long tube headers (I believe Crites even has the plates to notch your shock towers if you want to.), but I went with shorty style headers from FPA for ground clearance.

You will also need a transmission. The Lima engines have the same bell housing bolt pattern as the 351M/400 engines, so a C6 or AOD will bolt right up. You can also get C4 bell housings for Lima engines, but make sure that you build it strong enough to hold all the torque.



<b><big>Don’t sweat (or forget) the little stuff</big>

</b>

Your conversion may vary depending on what equipment you bolt to your engine, your chassis, etc., but here are the little things that I had to do:



  • I used the original FMX crossmember and elongated the holes in the rear mount about ½” to line it up.
  • I had to have a driveshaft made since the C6 is longer. I ended up cutting 3.5” off of my 351W/FMX driveshaft length. To figure your new driveshaft length, do this: Once the engine, tranny and rear end are in place stick a yoke into the transmission and bottom it out. Then pull it back about 1”. Measure from the center of the u-joint cup back to the center of the u-joint cup on the rear end. That is your driveshaft length. Easy, huh? I had a new shaft made and it cost $100 with new u-joints and balanced.
  • All Cougars from 68 on came with reinforcement plates welded around the lower shock towers. The quality of these installations varies. I had to cut out 2 small pieces out of the plate on the right side. Strangely enough the left side was fine. Looking back, I could have just hammered those 2 small areas back, but I cut them instead. Either way works.
  • When I did my test install with the headers I noticed that the header on the driver’s side was hitting the frame mount in the back and this was keeping the engine from dropping all the way in. How did I discover this? Because the bolt wouldn’t slide through from the front and the engine was obviously crooked. A few minutes with a grinder on the Crites frame mount and that obstacle was cleared.
  • No matter how much you look, bang and grind you are going to get some banging at an idle. This is due to the engine being on rubber mounts and being able to move around. I have a fairly mild cam and I still got them. I fixed this by installing a torque strap like the one described here. By putting some preload on the strap I solved a bunch of annoying knocks.
  • Find an angled oil filter adapter. I believe that Ford Racing offers them, but you can get one in a junkyard from a truck or van. Any V8 (except an FE) will fit. Be sure to get all 3 pieces – adapter, bolt and block insert. While not necessary for the swap it will make things cleaner and neater in the area of the engine bay.
  • Power steering drop bracket. You may need one you may not. I put one on to help keep the header heat away from the bellows type cover on the PS ram.
  • Sway bar: If you want to run a front sway bar you will need to switch from the straight small block style to the bent big block one. The SB one might work but is right tight to the oil pan. I used a 1” bar from Mustangs Unlimited.








  • Speaking of won’t fit: Don’t buy an MSD billet #8580 distributor and expect your hood to close. Ask me how I know. I have a rebuilt Duraspark distributor in mine.
  • Oil pan: I used a stock 429 7 quartt pan from Ford Racing. Plenty of room.
  • Lower crossmember: All V8 cars have this brace for a reason. With the Crites mounts and FPA headers this stays with room to spare.
  • Export brace, Monte Carlo Bar, Sub-frame connectors: I highly recommend a one piece export brace. Monte Carlo bar? The straight one will go in, never tried
    a curved one. Sub-frame connectors? A must! The 460 engine has a lot of torque
    and twisting your ride is no way to enjoy it. I installed a set of bolt-in style connectors from Competition Engineering. I bolted them in before the engine install, and then welded them to be sure. BTW – The Mustang ones DO FIT the Cougars.
  • Springs. I had FE springs in the front of my Cougar. The ride was not too bad, but I thought that the front end sat too high. Probably because of all the lightening I did. I changed to SBF (351W) with a 1" drop and am much happier with the look. Amazingly enough she corners better now, too.
  • Starters? I have used both the mini and the stock Ford unit. Both go in and out easy with the headers in. No heat issues.
  • Battery relocation: I did move my battery to the trunk but with the fuel tank being the trunk floor NHRA says that's a no-no. So I put it back under the hood. Plenty of room. I have since gotten a Taylor battery box and moved the battery back to the trunk.
  • If you are not installing power steering then you can gain another ½” or so of clearance between the water pump and radiator by using a water pump and pulley set from a 68 or 69 Thunderbird or Lincoln. Make sure that you get all of the pulleys and brackets as well as the harmonic balancer and spacer. The early and late styles are not interchangeable. The early style balancer has 2 grooves in it that act as pulleys.










  • Accessory brackets. I looked long and hard because my engine came from an 85 Ford truck and had that huge cast PS/AC bracket and all I could find were brackets that put the PS pump way too high. I got to thinking that Cougars and Mustangs came with 429s in the early 70s and did a web search.
    The 71 429
    CJ Mustang and Cougar Megasite

    had
    pictures of just what I needed

    ! I ended up getting my brackets off a late 70s Ford truck. I also picked up a set from a 74 Cougar with a 460.
  • Belts and hoses: I used the belts from a 71 Cougar with a 429. For the top hose I used a molded one from a 69 Cougar 428, cut to fit. A molded hose for the 71 Cougar 429 works well on the bottom.
  • Air breather assembly. With the engine sitting up higher I had to either swap my Eliminator hood scoop for a Boss429 one, or give up my Performer RPM intake manifold. I went with an Edelbrock Performer 460 intake, which is essentially an aluminum reproduction of the factory 4V manifold. Using this manifold and an Edelbrock carburetor I can run a 14” x 2.25” air filter element in a 289 HiPo chrome breather under my Eliminator hood scoop. If you want to run factory looking RamAir you’re going to have to play games with drop bases and everything else.
<big><big>So put it in,
already!
</big></big><big><big>

</big></big>


Alright, so you’ve got your parts and pieces and you’re ready to put it in. Here’s how I did it:

Have the radiator out of the car. Leave all accessories (alt, pulleys, PS pump and brackets) off of the engine. I do have the WP on as it makes a great handle for swinging and jiggling the engine.


  • Put the frame mounts (they are marked L and R and Forward) into the engine bay but leave them loose. Put the insulators onto the block and tighten them down.
  • Do a dry run with just the engine and headers installed to check the side-to-side clearance. I customized one tube on each header to make a bit more room.






  • Bolt the engine and tranny together (don’t forget the torque converter).
  • Bolt on the left (drivers) side header. Tighten it right up.
  • Start lowering the engine & tranny assembly into the engine bay. A tilt device for your hoist is a good thing to have here since the tail shaft has to be way down to clear everything.
  • About the time the engine is lined up but still up in the air – above the shock towers – I install the right (passenger) side header and tighten it down. You can swap this header once the engine is in and bolted down (it takes about an hour to R&R it) but it’s a lot easier to do it now.
  • Finish lowering the engine/tranny assembly into place. Put in the rear crossmember, line everything up and then tighten it down. That’s it. It’s in. This part takes me about 30 minutes working by myself in a 1 stall garage with a chain falls to raise and lower the engine.






















<big><big>But 460s run hot…

</big></big>





  • I used an OEM three core 24” radiator and an 18” flex-a-lite plastic fan with a fan shroud from a 69 Cougar. I did trim the fan a bit with a pair of scissors and I cut off the A/C pulley from the bottom pulley set, but this plastic POS fan pulls a ton of air and has a flat face. You will have to drill out the center hole of any fan you get since the BBF water pump shaft is ½” and most fans are made to fit Chevvies which are 7/16”.
    I went through 3 fans (can’t return ‘em once you drill ‘em) before I found this one. I did have a 17” flex-a-lite metal fan that worked okay but this plastic one is much better. I also installed an external AT cooler so that the radiator is only cooling the engine. I have a 195º Stant thermostat and according to my Autometer temp gauge the engine runs at 195º. She did hit 205º one day when I was idling in gear at 550 RPM and it was in the mid 80s. Perhaps I will try a 180º
    thermostat…












So there you have it. A 460 cubic inch engine installed in a 1969 Mercury Cougar. Contrary to what a lot of purists say, it looks really good in there and with the aluminum heads, intake and tube headers it is actually as light if not lighter than the FEs that Mercury installed from the factory. And if it starts feeling slow you can always stroke it to 514 cid!
 

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Here is my limited experience with those big ole truck engines: I have been disappointed at times in the take off in some big block trucks, expecting them to be much faster than the small block trucks. Then I hooked up a trailer that would have the trans down shifting and the small block screaming and that 460 just pulled away as smooth as ever like it didn't even notice the 8,000 extra pounds back there.
A buddy pulled the 460 out of his nice running but worn out F150 and dropped it in his Mach 1 along with a thumper cam and valve job. Not many folks around wanted to go up against it and it was VERY difficult to get him on a rolling start. Didn't matter what speed or gear he was in: he had torque that would raise the front end and dig.
Still remember too, those old Police Interceptors with 429s and the sound they made sucking huge volumes of the atmosphere when they took off. Rode in ex trooper car once and that heavy boat didn't snap your neck on take off but the power came on and it just kept accelerating, it kept pulling through every gear shift.
 

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TheRktmn, that is a great write up! I wish I would have had that back in the 90's when I did mine!
So a request for some pics of the engine compartment and follow up on the TKO conversion. As I mentioned I did this a long time ago. I did use the Crites motor mounts (now referred to as Gen 1) and Tubular Automotive headers. They were like the Crites headers and crisscrossed under the engine. With this combo the engine sat exactly where the C6 could use the factory trans crossmember, driveshaft and shifter linkage. I had accumulated many parts cars and had all the parts needed for that. The first engine was a 460 from a T-Bird. It was bone stock except for the Holley 750. I ran a 85 Mustang GT air cleaner and it fit under the hood. I ran a repop for core copper/brass radiator for a 428 Mustang (clamp-in style) with a 16" pusher fan and a flexlite mechanical fan. This worked. I ran this way until 99. In 99 I moved and the car sat in storage. Someone poured water in the carb while it was in storage. It was outside but had a car cover and a tarp over it so someone was just mean. Anyway, by the time I had gone back to get the car and move it the rust had set in. A couple of the cylinders where the valves had been open were full of water and the engine wouldn't turn over. It had sat for almost a year like that. So long story short I pulled the engine, machine shop sonicly checked the block and said it would need sleeves in those cylinders because it had been bored once before and wasn't enough casting to clean it up. So I began the search for a new block. I found this 1970 429 with about 70,000 miles on it. It was 10.5:1 CR and upon inspection was in great shape. I just put rings and bearings in it, a mild cam, aluminum intake and a new 750. I had also converted it to a Duraspark ignition in 1990 so I reused my distributor. The remained like that until just about a year ago. I decided to put a more aggressive cam in it and upgrade to aluminum heads. I did the swap and was very pleased until three of the Comp Cams roller rockers I used had failed and sent metal thru the engine. The 429 had not been apart in 18 years and when I tore it down it still looked pretty good but there was some scoring on the crank. I priced getting it reground. Then I saw that I could buy a stroker crank for just a bit more. I would have to replace the pistons with the stroker crank so I decided to clean up the cylinders and go .030" over. So that's where i am. I had a custom ground cam made, had the curve of the distributor checked on a machine because I had changed the springs and limiter myself. I used new push rods and Voodoo rockers to replace all the comp cam stuff. i had the rotating assembly balanced because it was all new forged pistons and rods and new crank. I degreed the cam which was good because the Cloyes double roller chain actually retarded the cam 4 degrees. I gapped the rings for a NA engine and so on. So it was balanced and blueprinted, degreed and all assembled. My cam guy recommended breaking in the cam without the inner springs. Since that would be unpleasant to change springs in the car I decided to pay for a dyno day and get the cam broke in and see what it would make. So a couple weeks ago we made did that. He didn't have Ford headers or electric water pump for the dyno so I ran the engine with my Alternator, water pump, headers and I provided the 93 pump gas because he had only race fuel. So the dyno runs were made exactly as the engine will be in the car. The engine is ready to go back in the car. I mocked up the trans and had to modify the trans tunnel just a little. I had to use Crites Gen 2 motor mounts to lower the engine and move it back so the shifter would be in a god place and to get the driveline angle correct. I have all that done so all I have to do is put it together. I travel for me job so I'm not able to work on it every weekend. But it will be back together before it gets cold!
 

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