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Discussion Starter #1
What am i looking at to put a 5.0 from a late model mustang into my 65? What about a 4.6L?

thanx for any info

by the way i would keep carburation(sp), going to EFI would be more trouble than its worth to me
 

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This is one topic for which a search would be useful. Here are a few topics to get you started...
5.0L swap 1 and 5.0L swap 2
For starters, for the first years of the Mustang, the mod motors are too wide (wider than a 429, in fact) to fit in the engine bay without a huge amount of front end surgery due to their overhead cam configuration. They also have limited aftermarket carburetion (read it exists, but is VERY expensive.
By contrast, the 5.0L block is essentially interchangeable with the earlier "non-roller" blocks, with the exception of a few details listed in these articles. The intake bolts on, the early model water pump and timing cover bolts on, etc. And, many have done this swap and found it relatively easy. The only thing you will have to change is your bellhousing (to a 66 6 bolt bell), and you'll have to get a clutch pivot arm adaptor, too.
Good luck!
Daniel
 

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Discussion Starter #3
sounds good, thanx, i try searches all the time and it never seems to work very well. Maybe its a newbie thing?
 

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I hear ya... that's what we're here for. ::
Daniel
 

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sounds good, thanx, i try searches all the time and it never seems to work very well. Maybe its a newbie thing?
Maybe, maybe not. But I would strongly reconsider the carb swap if I were you. If you are goint to a 5.0, the EFI is the way to go.
 

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I've been researching and preparing for the 5.0 swap in my '66 using a carb, and here is what I have found out.

From 1962-1981, all Ford 221-260-289-302 small blocks used the 28.2oz imbalance. From 1982-2001, the 5.0 (302) used the 50oz imbalance. In 1985, the 5spd 5.0 Mustangs used a roller cam 5.0,
and from 1986, until the end of 5.0-prowered Mustang production in 1995, all Mustangs used the ‘roller motor’, and by 1986, 5.0s with EFI were using ‘roller motors’. This information is written assuming that you want a ‘roller’ motor and have a small block car or all of the small block parts. Most 5.0s have a serpentine belt in place of the traditional V-belts. 5.0s also use a 4-bolt crank pulley, which complicates things more This leaves you with several choices, keep the serpentine setup, switch to V-belts and find a 4-bolt crank pulley, or use a conversion damper and bolt up the stock 3-bolt pulleys. If you want to stay with the serpentine belt setup, you would be able to keep the late model alternator which is a plus. The 5.0 timing cover will accept any style water pump (except the ones for 289s that dont need a backer). The 5.0 timing covers and timing chain sets accept the eccentric to drive the mechanical fuel pump. If you want an electric fuel pump, go to the junkyard and look at F150s with EFI. These trucks should have a frame rail mounted electric fuel pump that you can use in a classic car (take the brackets and related items). To fix the waterpump outlet problems encountered when using a ‘70 or later water pump on a pre ‘70 car, you can buy a special radiator, have yours modified at a radiator shop, or find a hose that you can trim down and use for the lower hose (a stock upper hose should fit fine). You will need to relocate your oil dipstick to the front of the motor. To do this you could buy a new cover, use your old cover, or drill a hole in the 5.0 cover (‘86-93) to put the dipstick in front. Don't forget to put a plug in the old dipstick hole on the side of the block (the hole just needs tapped for a 1/8in NPT brass plug.) You will need to reuse your original oil pan. ************************************************************************
The Mustang HO 1985 was the first year for the ‘roller’ 5.0, which was used in ONLY 5spd cars. 1986 Mustang 5.0 HOs had E6AE truck heads, cast pistons with no valve reliefs, Speed Density EFI, roller cams, and are generally considered the ‘worst’ 5.0 HO in stock form. 1987-’88 Mustang 5.0 HOs had E7TE heads, cast pistons, Speed Density EFI, and roller cams. 1988 Calif. Emissions Mustang 5.0 HOs had E7TE heads, forged pistons, Mass Air EFI, roller cams, and are generally considered the ‘best’ stock 5.0. The MAF EFI responds well to modifications, and the forged pistons are extremely durable and tolerate high-lift cams. For 1988, ONLY Calif. Emissions cars had Mass air, the rest were speed density. 1989-1993 Mustang 5.0 HOs had E7TE heads, forged pistons, Mass Air EFI, roller cams, and are generally considered the ‘best’ stock 5.0. The MAF EFI responds well to modifications, and the forged pistons are extremely durable and tolerate high-lift cams well.
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There are also clutch issues depending on which manual transmission you use, as Ford deleted the hole for the 60's style clutch linkage, but you can buy a bracket to fix this. When using a C4, there is a special flexplate/flywheel required; one is made by TCI and sold by Summit for about 60 bucks.
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You can put a 4.6 in a '65 by using a mustangII or SN95 style suspension that eliminates the shocktowers. This swap requires a special oil pan and some other things manufactured specifically for the swap.
HTH
-Kyle
 
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