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Discussion Starter #1
I just purchased a 57 Ford rear end and I noticed the spring perches have a huge hole for the locating pin. The hole is 1 inch in diameter. Did Fords of that era have locating pins that large?

 

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I'm not an expert but I did use a 57 housing in a 66 Mustang and I don't recall such a large hole but that was a long time ago (~30 years), so that detail may have faded from my memory.

What I do remember is that the spring perch was not welded all that well and the perch started to wrap up after a bunch of >7000 rpm launches on slicks. I think you would be wise to get out the welder if your going to get aggresive with the power. Don't use the stock 57 axles they are very weak, use your 66 axles they are stronger.
 

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Never seen the holes that large. Personally, I see no reason to use the old style rearend. I got a 9" out of a 79 F150. It's a much beefier housing than anything that came in the cars. I cut the spring perches and shock mounts off. I bought new housing ends that I'm going to weld on after I shorten the housing. I'm adding a back brace to further strengthen the housing. By the time I'm done I'll have just a couple of hundred bucks into a housing that is more than strong enough to hand 5,000+ rpm launches with a 5 speed on slicks.
 

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Greg, a 57 housing doesn't have the large hole like that. Have they been drilled out to fit what he was going to put it on. What is the width from outside flange to outside flange. It should be 52 3/8 and the spring center should be 43 something I believe. I can check mine for you tomorrow. Give ne a call about the measurements.
 

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Maxum96. the reason for using the 57 rearend is that it's a simple bolt in with the right width and spring centers. It's a strong housing for street and strip in the 65 and 66 cars. I've been running one for 11 years now with some road track time and a lot of 1/4 mile launches at 4000 RPM. I've never had a problem with mine but I'm only 350 hp strong.
 

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I understand the bolt it issue, but with the fairly low cost buy housing ends ($70 for nice billet ones from manufacturers such as Stange, Currie, etc) and spring pad perches ($13 for heavy duty ones from Mopar) you can build a much stronger rear end for not much money. I bet 57 housings aren't cheap these days. 9" truck housings are a dime a dozen. So if you've got a welder, or a buddy with one, you have a heavy duty housing for under a $100. It's real easy to cut a housing down and weld new ends on. I'm toying with the idea of building 9" housings for people using old truck housings as the starting point.
 

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heres the deal. i used 57 ford rears in my 65-66 mustangs and the hole was the standard 1/2". that one has ben drilled out. cougars and torinos have a rubber insulator wraped around the leaf spring and have that large pilot. my 68 torino has that large hole in the perch. a friends 68 cougar has the same BIG setup. that could have ben used in a cougar. behold a foto of the torino/cougar insulator the sits on top of the spring and the big hole in the spring perch sits on that pilot. i never measured the size of the hole but its about an inch. i bet that 57 rear was in a cougar cause it has the same center to center distance as the 57 perches. theres a metal bracket that wraps completely around the rubber and holds it in place. the leafs have the standard 1/2" pilot stud that fits in a 1/2" hole in the rubber insulator. its purpose is to reduce road noise....ssshhhhh....queit in the car !!!!!:shocked:
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Supershifter, thanks, that's exactly what I need to fix this problem.

Jim, housing measures 52 1/4" inside flange to inside of the other flange, spring centers on 43". Can't remember outside flange measurements. It's the right housing for sure, but I think those holes have been wallowed out for the Cougar application, as been mentioned.
 

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I was thinking they had been drilled just by the look of them. The 9 inch I have for the Falcon I'm working on is from a Torino and has the large holes. My friend Patrick welded in washers that reduce it to the !/2 size. When you get your's done and I get mine done we'll see who has the best looking rearend.
 

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I understand the bolt it issue, but with the fairly low cost buy housing ends ($70 for nice billet ones from manufacturers such as Stange, Currie, etc) and spring pad perches ($13 for heavy duty ones from Mopar) you can build a much stronger rear end for not much money. I bet 57 housings aren't cheap these days. 9" truck housings are a dime a dozen. So if you've got a welder, or a buddy with one, you have a heavy duty housing for under a $100. It's real easy to cut a housing down and weld new ends on. I'm toying with the idea of building 9" housings for people using old truck housings as the starting point.
Building 9" rear end housings is a large part of what I do here at my fabrication shop. While not rocket science, you will need more tools than common hand tools. A lathe will be needed to turn down the housing ends. You will also need an alignment bar with all the mandrels for the various sizes of bearing ends. A way to straighten the housings will be needed as well. Cleaning equipment for steam cleaning and sandblasting will be needed. The other obstacle is figuring out how to make an offset housing into a centered housing and vice versa. I am not saying that it is impossible, but I have been doing this for 25 years and I still find it a challenge doing these things. With the ready made housings now available, I find it easier to buy the new housings and re-sell them sometimes rather that put all the labor into one and making very little on it. Let me know If I can help.
 

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Building 9" rear end housings is a large part of what I do here at my fabrication shop. While not rocket science, you will need more tools than common hand tools. A lathe will be needed to turn down the housing ends. You will also need an alignment bar with all the mandrels for the various sizes of bearing ends. A way to straighten the housings will be needed as well. The other obstacle is figuring out how to make an offset housing into a centered housing and vice versa. I am not saying that it is impossible, but I have been doing this for 25 years and I still find it a challenge doing these things.
Very well put!!
 
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