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I think I am going to make and try out a solid state instrument voltage regulator. Mostly because I fried mine today and don't want to wait for a replacement to get here via UPS. I know after some reading the stock unit isn't a true 5v. It is a pulsed output that is supposed to average around 5v. I have run across lots of threads where people have made these with parts from radio shack that put out a nice constant 5v. I saw a couple of posts that at 5v the fuel gauge reads a little low because the gauges are actually designed to run at 6v. Does anyone know for sure whether it is 5v or 6v?
 

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I made my own, and haven't seen any issues with any of the gauges.
 

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Does anyone know for sure whether it is 5v or 6v?
Doesn't the output voltage vary according to the input voltage? 12.5V In (Engine off) = 5V Out and 13.5V In (Engine running) = 6V Out?

I'm not an electrical engineer and I didn't stay at Holiday Inn last night.
 

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Ford spec: average voltage of 5.0 VDC.

Paul
 

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I made my own, and haven't seen any issues with any of the gauges.
Many solid state applications run at 5V. (Not 6V)

Look up Radio Shack voltage Regulator #2761770
 
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Realize the difference in the voltage is in the resulting deflection of the needle. I would go for 5V, but if it is slightly less or more, the needle will move more or less. As along as you know where the needle is reading when displaying a normal reading, it's all good.
 

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voltage regulator

I used the radio shack 276-1770 on two of my cars its a 5V output, the gauges do read a little low, if i had to do it over again i would try to find something that averaged 6V.
But its still better than the factory CV regulator was.
 

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Generally around 6 volts is the spec for the Fords.
Just converted a '48 F-1 pickup to 12V, but left the gauges at 6V, going through a solid state
voltage reducer to accomplish that. There are several different units commonly in use out on
the market, including some that will allow you to vary the output slightly to compensate for
slight variations on electric inputs (that seem to be the rule) with electrical gauges.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Voltage-Reducer-Regulator-12-Volts-to-6-volts-or-easy-select-Voltage-output-/141904823093?hash=item210a2fc335:g:xCAAAOSwstxVRqXG

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Voltage-Reducer-Regulator-12-VOLTS-to-6-VOLTS-15-AMPS-/141904817823?hash=item210a2fae9f:g:kLAAAOxyNDhSZtbB
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Just to follow up on this. I ended up going with the 5v regulator chip from radio shack that most people seemed to be using. The 276-1770 that Flade and mustang6 mentioned above. I'll have to drive it a bit to know for sure but everything seems to be working fine. Fuel gauge seems to be in the same spot it was before I shorted the old regulator. Temp gauge is running in about the same position. That was a quick, cheap and easy little upgrade. I'm glad I did it and it saved me 2 or 3 days waiting on a new one to arrive.
 

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Generally around 6 volts is the spec for the Fords.
Not sure where your getting this from. My 1968, 1972, and 1978 Ford Shop manuals all say 5V. Ford used the same basic 5V IVR from the mid-60s to the mid-80s.

Paul
 
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