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Discussion Starter #301
My brother, grandson and his friend showed up on Saturday to help me guide the Coyote into place for hopefully the last time. Took some real finesse but got it set into place. Lifted the engine back up some to slide the headers into place long enough to determine the right clocking of the O2 bungs, then pulled them back off, will deliver them to welder tomorrow night. Set the top of the radiator support back into place, set the radiator (temporarily) installed the air tube and CAI box. Did another test fit of the hydrauboost brake system. WOW! very close all around but everything fitting.
Pulled the control box cable kit out...getting the fuse/relay box set in there someplace is going to be interesting, may go under the dash on passenger side. Looks like some creature that Sigourney Weaver would defend against.
Went ahead and temporarily installed the shifter and old drivers seat where I could sit in and check out placement of the shifter and parking brake....all good. I ran the shifter through the gear position several times, no brummm brummm motor sounds, at least not outloud.
 

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Real quick... what front suspension setup did you go with again?
 

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Discussion Starter #303

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Discussion Starter #305
At the time, and maybe still not, Maier didn't have anything conducive to a Coyote swap. And Griggs definitely had proven track record for many years. Both good setups.
 

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At the time, and maybe still not, Maier didn't have anything conducive to a Coyote swap. And Griggs definitely had proven track record for many years. Both good setups.
Oh ok... Maier is further along now.

He has a setup for the coyote and there’s a guy getting a voodoo setup through him now as well.

That’s going in an early falcon.

It has it’s own fb page that I’m following.

My plan is to go the Maier route.
 

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Discussion Starter #307
So been doing lot of planning lately, deciding what order to install bunch of stuff. I have found that spending a couple evenings measuring and planning, while not seeming to be productive, can save a lot of time later.
Some things though, take a LOT of time no matter how well planned. Had one of those "What was I thinking about, doing a Coyote swap?!" , but it went away when I finally go things in place.
I raised the engine some and wrestled the headers into place. Passenger side was a real bear, but once in place they fit great. The real tear jerker was getting the bolts in. I had already found that even with full access, engine out of vehicle and no headers, the bolts were a pain to get started. I ended up tapering the bolt ends slightly and that helped immensely.
Now set the engine in place, with headers and gaskets and no visibility, and it became a nightmare. Had to start most of them by feel, I couldn't see the bolts holes and start them at the same time, had to bend my wrist and fingers at seemingly impossible angles to reach in there. I had to use two different ratchets, a swivel, sockets of course, and box end wrench. The worst was the last bolt, the back top one on the passenger side. I finally figured out that by peering through a hole in the inner fender, that I could see the bolt. So I ended up inserting a 1/4 inch flexible extension through the hole, THEN snapping the flex joint and socket on the end. I was then able to get it in to the point I could get larger 3/8s on it to tighten it up. Incidentally, I had picked up a swivel handle ratchet from Harbor Fright a while back, can't remember how much I paid but it was worth every penny that night. Finished up about 12:30 in the morning. My 60+ year old body was so worn out from climbing under the car, getting back out to either adjust the hoist or start a bolt, and then stretching in all sorts of positions, and stressing joints, all on a icy cold concrete floor, I spent the next few evenings recovering. BUT it looks awesome!
 

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So been doing lot of planning lately, deciding what order to install bunch of stuff. I have found that spending a couple evenings measuring and planning, while not seeming to be productive, can save a lot of time later.
Some things though, take a LOT of time no matter how well planned. Had one of those "What was I thinking about, doing a Coyote swap?!" , but it went away when I finally go things in place.
I raised the engine some and wrestled the headers into place. Passenger side was a real bear, but once in place they fit great. The real tear jerker was getting the bolts in. I had already found that even with full access, engine out of vehicle and no headers, the bolts were a pain to get started. I ended up tapering the bolt ends slightly and that helped immensely.
Now set the engine in place, with headers and gaskets and no visibility, and it became a nightmare. Had to start most of them by feel, I couldn't see the bolts holes and start them at the same time, had to bend my wrist and fingers at seemingly impossible angles to reach in there. I had to use two different ratchets, a swivel, sockets of course, and box end wrench. The worst was the last bolt, the back top one on the passenger side. I finally figured out that by peering through a hole in the inner fender, that I could see the bolt. So I ended up inserting a 1/4 inch flexible extension through the hole, THEN snapping the flex joint and socket on the end. I was then able to get it in to the point I could get larger 3/8s on it to tighten it up. Incidentally, I had picked up a swivel handle ratchet from Harbor Fright a while back, can't remember how much I paid but it was worth every penny that night. Finished up about 12:30 in the morning. My 60+ year old body was so worn out from climbing under the car, getting back out to either adjust the hoist or start a bolt, and then stretching in all sorts of positions, and stressing joints, all on a icy cold concrete floor, I spent the next few evenings recovering. BUT it looks awesome!

How much room is there between the firewall and the back of the motor?
 

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Good job. I can relate on that 60+ body ache as well. Wife decided she wanted us to rent a 6” chipper/shredder and clear out some of our view down the valley. We did about 150 trees from saplings to 6” diameter trees, all hardwoods. I feel like I’ve been in 3 consecutive car wrecks. My suggestion for you would have been to fabricate a tilt front end first thing....
 

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So been doing lot of planning lately, deciding what order to install bunch of stuff. I have found that spending a couple evenings measuring and planning, while not seeming to be productive, can save a lot of time later.
Some things though, take a LOT of time no matter how well planned. Had one of those "What was I thinking about, doing a Coyote swap?!" , but it went away when I finally go things in place.
I raised the engine some and wrestled the headers into place. Passenger side was a real bear, but once in place they fit great. The real tear jerker was getting the bolts in. I had already found that even with full access, engine out of vehicle and no headers, the bolts were a pain to get started. I ended up tapering the bolt ends slightly and that helped immensely.
Now set the engine in place, with headers and gaskets and no visibility, and it became a nightmare. Had to start most of them by feel, I couldn't see the bolts holes and start them at the same time, had to bend my wrist and fingers at seemingly impossible angles to reach in there. I had to use two different ratchets, a swivel, sockets of course, and box end wrench. The worst was the last bolt, the back top one on the passenger side. I finally figured out that by peering through a hole in the inner fender, that I could see the bolt. So I ended up inserting a 1/4 inch flexible extension through the hole, THEN snapping the flex joint and socket on the end. I was then able to get it in to the point I could get larger 3/8s on it to tighten it up. Incidentally, I had picked up a swivel handle ratchet from Harbor Fright a while back, can't remember how much I paid but it was worth every penny that night. Finished up about 12:30 in the morning. My 60+ year old body was so worn out from climbing under the car, getting back out to either adjust the hoist or start a bolt, and then stretching in all sorts of positions, and stressing joints, all on a icy cold concrete floor, I spent the next few evenings recovering. BUT it looks awesome!
Measuring and pre-planning are necessary, never doubt how fit checks will save you rework down the road. Sometimes I think the planning I put into the placement and harness routing for my PCM was excessive, on the other hand, I am happy with it and it does not have to be redone, priceless!
Yeah, I have had more than a few of those moments too where you ask yourself if the Coyote route was worth it. When you get the car on the road, those thoughts will be quickly forgotten.
I have only used a couple of the bolts so far, just used a few of the original studs to secure the headers for now. Thanks for the suggestion on tapering the bolt ends, I will remember that. Any reason you did not install the headers on the engine before dropping it in? We have had my engine in and out several times with the headers installed, plenty of room with my TCP subframe.
The question asked by Vogelsong is a good one. There will be almost no room at all if the CMCVs are retained unless provisions are made for more room in the firewall. Many remove the vacuum actuators and lock the CMCVs to gain room. I chose to push my firewall back 2 inches on the PS of the rear intake area so that I could keep them and to have some room for the heater bypass valve and the fuel pressure regulator. All of these items need a home and it is basically behind the intake. That said, when my engine goes in for the last time, the intake with the CMCVs will be removed and reinstalled after the engine is in. I intend to install the engine and transmission together as a unit requiring a pretty steep angle on the tail shaft end of the transmission. Its like better, faster, cheaper, pick one or two as you cannot have all three. Stuffing the Coyote in fully dressed is the same problem.
I agree that the Ultimate Headers look great. I will have mine coated before final install.
I see you welded the clamps on with the O2 bungs in a fixed position, looks good and the O2 sensors will be a bit closed to the ports. Not sure if mine being a couple inches further downstream will be an issue, likely not when you consider where they are placed in long tube headers.
Keep up the good work, always good to see some progress.
 

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Measuring and pre-planning are necessary, never doubt how fit checks will save you rework down the road. Sometimes I think the planning I put into the placement and harness routing for my PCM was excessive, on the other hand, I am happy with it and it does not have to be redone, priceless!
Yeah, I have had more than a few of those moments too where you ask yourself if the Coyote route was worth it. When you get the car on the road, those thoughts will be quickly forgotten.
I have only used a couple of the bolts so far, just used a few of the original studs to secure the headers for now. Thanks for the suggestion on tapering the bolt ends, I will remember that. Any reason you did not install the headers on the engine before dropping it in? We have had my engine in and out several times with the headers installed, plenty of room with my TCP subframe.
The question asked by Vogelsong is a good one. There will be almost no room at all if the CMCVs are retained unless provisions are made for more room in the firewall. Many remove the vacuum actuators and lock the CMCVs to gain room. I chose to push my firewall back 2 inches on the PS of the rear intake area so that I could keep them and to have some room for the heater bypass valve and the fuel pressure regulator. All of these items need a home and it is basically behind the intake. That said, when my engine goes in for the last time, the intake with the CMCVs will be removed and reinstalled after the engine is in. I intend to install the engine and transmission together as a unit requiring a pretty steep angle on the tail shaft end of the transmission. Its like better, faster, cheaper, pick one or two as you cannot have all three. Stuffing the Coyote in fully dressed is the same problem.
I agree that the Ultimate Headers look great. I will have mine coated before final install.
I see you welded the clamps on with the O2 bungs in a fixed position, looks good and the O2 sensors will be a bit closed to the ports. Not sure if mine being a couple inches further downstream will be an issue, likely not when you consider where they are placed in long tube headers.
Keep up the good work, always good to see some progress.
So if you’re not running the factory intake the CMCV’s aren’t an issue, and there’s no extra clearance at the firewall needed... correct?
 

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So if you’re not running the factory intake the CMCV’s aren’t an issue, and there’s no extra clearance at the firewall needed... correct?
I will leave that determination up to the builder. So many variations on engine position due to subframe choice, no way for me to say.
 

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Discussion Starter #313
How much room is there between the firewall and the back of the motor?
Here is post where I addressed that. Lot of hammer and dolly work.
 

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Discussion Starter #314
Any reason you did not install the headers on the engine before dropping it in? We have had my engine in and out several times with the headers installed, plenty of room with my TCP subframe.
Even without them installed, I knew it was going to be a tight squeeze getting it into place. Also, my grandson and his buddy showed up kind of late so I thought it might be just my brother and I setting it into place. Maybe with the full crew I would have attempted it. I will readily admit, once I got into installing them, I was wishing we had attempted to install them before setting the engine.

I see you welded the clamps on with the O2 bungs in a fixed position, looks good and the O2 sensors will be a bit closed to the ports. Not sure if mine being a couple inches further downstream will be an issue, likely not when you consider where they are placed in long tube headers.
Keep up the good work, always good to see some progress.
Yeah, I went back and forth on that, then decided I wanted them where Ford designed them. AND I wanted to be able to go ahead and get the sensors installed with the control pack and figured having the bungs in the down pipes might slow up exhaust install further down the road. When I had the crew there, we set the headers in place and I took a paint pen and marked where I wanted the bungs and then had guy down the road weld them up for me. Maybe one day I will set up for stainless, but figured it was easier and cheaper to have someone who knows it to go ahead and do it.
 

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Here is post where I addressed that. Lot of hammer and dolly work.
I don’t plan on running the stock intake so I don’t think fhe CMCV’s will be somethjng I’ll have to worry about.

hats off to you for going the extra mile. 👍🏻
 

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Discussion Starter #316
Getting closer to installing the pedals in the car so figured I should go ahead and address the fact that I had no cover on clutch pedal, new original style on brake and new style on gas pedal.
I have seen too many non Shelby, non-Cobra Jet Mustangs turned into cartoon caricatures by sticking cobra emblems all over the place and had decided to keep mine original looking and NO cobras or Eleanor crap. Well, decided to make a subtle exception and get a set of Mustangs To Fear covers. Just a little shout out to the Cobra performance world. May change my mind later but then again, they do look pretty slick.
 

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Discussion Starter #317
Getting close to the time I will be running brake lines, fuel lines, exhaust, drive shaft, wires etc on the bottom side with no room to crawl under there and no lift. Seen guys build cribbing under the tires to set car on. Nice, stout, but there the car sit immobile. Decided to build some cribbing that sits on and in my roller pads. I had a bunch of 2x4s from the crate that the motor came in and box of spiral deck screws left from building back deck. The bottoms have stops that fit down inside the rollers and lock into place, the top have roll stops that the tires lock into. This way I can have it elevated to work on and still be able to move it around. And it moves very nicely.
 

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Getting close to the time I will be running brake lines, fuel lines, exhaust, drive shaft, wires etc on the bottom side with no room to crawl under there and no lift. Seen guys build cribbing under the tires to set car on. Nice, stout, but there the car sit immobile. Decided to build some cribbing that sits on and in my roller pads. I had a bunch of 2x4s from the crate that the motor came in and box of spiral deck screws left from building back deck. The bottoms have stops that fit down inside the rollers and lock into place, the top have roll stops that the tires lock into. This way I can have it elevated to work on and still be able to move it around. And it moves very nicely.
Innovative. If you wanted to be even safer you could probably run a ratchet strap around tire/cribbing/dolly and lock it down.
 

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Getting closer to installing the pedals in the car so figured I should go ahead and address the fact that I had no cover on clutch pedal, new original style on brake and new style on gas pedal.
I have seen too many non Shelby, non-Cobra Jet Mustangs turned into cartoon caricatures by sticking cobra emblems all over the place and had decided to keep mine original looking and NO cobras or Eleanor crap. Well, decided to make a subtle exception and get a set of Mustangs To Fear covers. Just a little shout out to the Cobra performance world. May change my mind later but then again, they do look pretty slick.
I can’t believe you didn’t make your own....
 
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