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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Ok, a little out of sequence but one thing I worked on before the sand blasting was the panel below the rear glass. I ended up cutting it out and found the brace below it was eat up. I decided to try and repair it, and the repair turned pretty good but for reasons that will be revealed later, I almost wish I had replaced it.
To make a patch, I flipped the old panel over and cut out a section that mirrored the area I needed to replace and then went through the process of cutting, bending and hammering it into the shape I needed. By the time I got through, I had a very nice patch panel fabbed up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
One other step I took was to remove most of the transmission hump support to make room for T56. I cut it out then came back and hammered the raw ends flat and welded them up. I also decided to go with a convertible type one piece seat platform to help add rigidity to the area AND to give some additional head room since this platform is an inch or so lower than original.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Along the way, I had to repair the rear frame rails. I really ran into some frustration because I ordered two frame rail patches. I cut the bad section out of the first one and then got to comparing it to the patch. I am not sure that the old rusty original wasn't stronger than the patch! Especially the internal support bracket. It looked flimsy compared to the original. I ended up using the original bracket with the new patch. I didn't even bother to use the patch on the other side. I decided to send it back and made my own patches and repaired it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 · (Edited)
The rockers were pretty solid but I did fine a couple places that required repair. One was towards the front on the right...just a very small pin hole...yeah right! I cut out an exploratory hole much bigger than the pin hole and sure enough, still needed to cut more. By the time I got past the rusty area, I had a place almost 2x3 inches. I spent a long time cutting a patch just the right size and got just the right curve to it. Then started welding and immediately the heat induced some metal memory and it flattened back out. Oh well. I will either use a little filler or lead over it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
In the first picture below, you can see where I finally got to closing up the rear section, installing outer wheel houses. In the left of the picture is visible one of several patches I had to put in the floor.
I coated everything with Rust Bullet before installing the quarters.
 

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Man that is a lot of metal work. Just replacing my cowl is enough of a challenge, has me seeing spots, spot welds that is. I think someone said 154, hate they put a number out there, I think I have only done 50 so far.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Jumping into replacing the quarters was something I dreaded doing but looked forward to getting done. Over all the Dynacorn replacements fit fairly good but they did require some massaging to get to work. I hung the doors, clamped into place the filler panel below the back glass, the tail light panel and set the deck lid and quarter extensions to check the alignment of everything before I started welding. As you can see in the pictures, I had to rework the areas where the quarters met the filler panel to get them to work.
The two most difficult areas though were:
The quarters fit fine around the quarter vents but they didn't quite extend far enough down to reach the rockers, probably a 1/4 inch gap. I ended up setting sandbags along the top edges and used pipe clamps to force them down. Then I screwed it together inside to help pull and hold it while welding. I also had to use tack welds inside the seam between the quarter and rockers. Later on I will be grinding them down and might lead the seam in.
The other pain was the filler panel. I detailed in an earlier post how I repaired the panel support but bought a new panel. The problem is that the new panel didn't quite follow the contours of the of old support. I am thinking I should have replaced both. I ended up having to heat, mallet, and force the panel to fit, then had to go back and use a shrinking hammer in spots where it bulged out. I suspect I will have to use some filler along that area to level it.
I finally got everything lined up, tacked together and welded up. One picture shows my hi-tech way or adjusting the trunk opening. I cut and notched a board exactly the length I wanted and duck taped it to a house jack, set it in and cranked on the jack until the board dropped in place.
At the end of everything, I also installed new drip rails and finally went old school and leaded the seams.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Finally came the big day to start on the front suspension. The boxes arrived from Griggs and I started measuring. The shortcoming with installing Griggs is that they figure either they or their re-sellers will be installing and the instructions are pretty sparse. The expectation is that you really know what you are doing...ha ha. I did a lot of viewing pictures, reading specs and white papers and talking to the seller, Mustang Don Rositch before ever starting. I measured, measured again and.....measured again. I also used plum-bobs and marks on the floor to double check my square during installation. The K member uses existing bolt holes to locate. Once bolted in place you go to welding. It is attached at four locations, is very strong and changes the geometry quite a bit. It is similar to layout I saw of a Ferrari and of C4 Corvettes. The way the new shock tower is attached is somewhat sacrificial, it is strong but designed for racing and will bend or break in case of impact, meaning you can weld a replacement in and get back in business quickly. I decided to build it stronger. In a couple pictures you can see a triangular piece at the top of the tower, I deleted it and went with a piece that would close up the opening and give it more point of contact.
Also, I took some 1/8 inch steel and boxed in around the base of the tower.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
There was no cover made that really fit so I ordered one made for another kit and modified it. I had to cut it to fit around the tower and allow insertion of the top shock bolt. I decided to close it up and add additional strength by buying a piece of steel pipe, cutting it lengthwise and welding it in place. Once I got it all welded in place, it turned out looking pretty good and strong.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
While working on the front suspension, I wanted to add a little triangulation to add strength and stability AND add a jack point. I added small brace between torque box and frame, nothing serious, just a little additional stabilization. I ordered the combination jackpad/support/tie down from Mustangs To Fear. It is a real solid piece. Before welding it on, I welded a series of holes in the top to shave a little weight off. These holes are completely closed off as they are under the radiator support and sealer was applied all around.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
After getting the K member, new shock towers, jack pad etc installed, I wanted to get some finish on it before installing the suspension assembly. Everything received two coats of Rust Bullet, 3M seam sealer and U-Pol Raptor Liner with John Deere Blitz Black on areas not getting the Raptor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
Yep, first time. I watched several Youtubes on doing it that made it look a lot easier than it was for me. I have a suspicion that having a second person to operate the torch while I dabbed the lead and did the spreading would have helped. It is far from the amazing job the factory did. I will have to go back with some filler and finish it out but I am satisfied that leading it in made it much more permanent than filler alone.
 

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+1 on the JD Blitz Black. Painted my first ever carbon road bike with it, after having to do some carbon repair (dropped bike off rack at 60 mph doing ride recon). Also, nice work AND nice chronicling of the work.
 
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You seem to do a bunch of research before making a decision so I want to know why you choose Griggs over all the other options such as TCI, Heidts, AJE, Rod and Customs and so on. What systems did you consider and what was the final reason for going with Griggs ?

Following this build everyday and I love what your doing!
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
You seem to do a bunch of research before making a decision so I want to know why you choose Griggs over all the other options such as TCI, Heidts, AJE, Rod and Customs and so on. What systems did you consider and what was the final reason for going with Griggs ?

Following this build everyday and I love what your doing!
Thanks!

Yeah, I started out planning to go with a Mustang II and talked with and emailed a bunch of folks and shops with firsthand experience at installing them. When I started hearing the same remarks from different ones, a pattern developed.

TCI- Handles good but not very Coyote friendly and their rep admitted it. It was designed before the Coyote came out and re-designing it around the Coyote would mean changing the roll center in a way they didn't want to go. They do good on autocross.
Rod & Custom- Most liked them, handle good, priced nice and easy to install complete kit
Mustangs To Fear- Started out handling Rod & Custom but saw were some improvements could be made. I like the looks of their partial frame rail kit. Looks strong, heard it handles pretty good.
Heidt's Mustang II- Strong unit, handles good but not Coyote friendly, lot of work to get them to work with one.

Mustang II front end in general- decent handling, especially on short tight turns like autocross, fair to good handling on long sweeps. Ride somewhat on the firm side, heard that from multiple people.

One shop that I talked to really felt the Rod & Custom was the best choice for Coyote install UNLESS I wanted to step up a couple notches and $$ and look at Griggs and Cortex. Said they were the ultimate. Never heard of either one but started digging. The more I dug, the more I realized that this was a different class. I heard comments like "Ferrari like", "like driving a go cart" and "like it is on rails". Talked to Don Rostich at Mustang Dons. He has both installed and raced with Griggs setups for years. He related how he once had a Fox body with supercharged 5.0 and the regular competition add on's underneath that he raced at VIR. One day Bruce Griggs showed up with his Mustang and asked him to take it for a spin. He turned better times in a car with 100 less horsepower and decided he had been throwing his money away on power adders etc. and started using Griggs hardware. He has a 67 couple known for slaying the giants. He knows Filip and Cortex and Bruce Griggs both and likes both but leaned towards Griggs for Bruce's experience. Bruce called me personally and I got a good impression that I was talking to someone who knew his stuff.

I described the kind of car I was building and he asked me if I was building a genuine Ferrari or would I settle for a kit car. Convinced me I wanted handling to match the power of the Coyote and to go with a balanced package.

Where I parted from Don and Bruce's advise was in going with an IRS. Bruce in particular is not a fan of IRS and his torque arm setup is race proven so I didn't brush his advice off lightly. Almost went with it but I was determined to go for the advanced features and ride quality of IRS. After reading and talking to a lot of people, I suspect that I will be giving up some acceleration coming out of curves that a torque arm provides BUT the IRS will allow me to carry higher speeds through the curves. AND there is no denying that in the real world there are rough roads, unexpected bumps and the IRS handles them better, maintaining control and riding them better.

Heidt's website doesn't do a very good job of explaining the benefits of their systems. It didn't take me long to figure out that the Pro G IRS was definitely several steps above their Jag systems. If I had been able to have examined their Pro G front suspension, I might have considered it. Their web page just described their Mustang II systems with a mention that their Pro G was better. Once I actually looked at one though, I immediately saw that it was NOT a Mustang II and in fact, incorporates some of the geometry elements of the Griggs.
 

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Good stuff! Thank you for all that. That's just a few more systems to analyze before I move forward. I was leaning towards TCI as Revology choose them as their standard for the new cars they build so I figured it might be the best to go with since they will have lots of feed back on what works and what doesn't and hopefully continue to refine their setup. The other one for me was AJE as its a bolt in solution and as I understand it, once you go that way, you open up a bunch of options using Fox body parts such as spindles , brakes and tie rods and so on giving myself an opportunity to save some $$.


I will continue to watch as you drop in the Coyote so we can see how well the Griggs setup works!
 
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