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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I recently got a 65 Mustang with the 200 CID engine and an 1100 Autolite carb. I have verified that the starter solenoid works and have jumped a new ignition coil with a direct 12v from the battery. I have also cleaned every ground and connection I can find and took apart and polished all connections on the distributor and retimed everything with cylinder #1 at TDC with 12 degrees advance. I gapped the points to 0.025". The plugs and wires look decently new and I've cleaned them out as well. I've also cleaned out the carb and oiled and freed up all of the cylinders. The only thing I haven't done is a compression test.

I am getting a pretty consistent yellow spark when I take the wire from the ignition coil and bring it 1/8" away from the block. And all of the spark plugs are firing. I'm not sure what to do about the yellow spark, ideally, it should be blue, right?

When I hook up a battery and jump it with my truck it turns over but weakly, sort of like the battery is low but it is brand new. Possibly the starter is weak? I can barely get any cylinders to fire even with squirting fuel/starting fluid into the intake. Sometimes it will putter a little bit like it is trying to but that is the best I've gotten.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated. The next step I am thinking is to try to figure out why I am getting a yellow spark after replacing the ignition coil and maybe get a new starter.

Thanks for any help,
Ryan
 

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Make sure the point gap is correct, so proper spark can develop. Check that you are getting 12V to the coil while starting.
 

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Here's where the "basics" come into play. You have to have fuel, spark,compression and spark at the right time. So far you have spark (even if it might be weak), and get something from fuel/starting fluid. That's 2 out of 4. If your timing is correct (not 180* out), then look seriously at the compression. After so much time, the rings might be stuck in their grooves and not opening to get compression. My 66 ran with all compression in the 50-60 psi bracket (I'm now doing a ring & bearing job on it) (the ring gap on the old ones is 0.150 when it should be .010-.020). I soaked the cylinders with Marvel Mystery Oil for 48 hours (I added extra oil several times a day as it seeped past the rings) and that brought the compression up after it all seeped away.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Here's where the "basics" come into play. You have to have fuel, spark,compression and spark at the right time. So far you have spark (even if it might be weak), and get something from fuel/starting fluid. That's 2 out of 4. If your timing is correct (not 180* out), then look seriously at the compression. After so much time, the rings might be stuck in their grooves and not opening to get compression. My 66 ran with all compression in the 50-60 psi bracket (I'm now doing a ring & bearing job on it) (the ring gap on the old ones is 0.150 when it should be .010-.020). I soaked the cylinders with Marvel Mystery Oil for 48 hours (I added extra oil several times a day as it seeped past the rings) and that brought the compression up after it all seeped away.
Alright, thank you very much for your help. I'll look into getting some Marvel Mystery Oil for the rings. Even if it has low compression, shouldn't I be able to at least get it to somewhat idle? As far as I am aware the timing is correct. I put my finger in the plug hole and turned it until the compression stroke for cylinder #1. After that, I rotated it to 12 degrees and tightened the distributor so that the rotor was just touching the #1 spark plug post. This is my first time messing with a distributor so I am just going off of what I've seen online. I am thinking it's possible I have it slightly out of time.

When cylinder 1 is at 12 degrees before TDC should the rotor cap be directly on the #1 post on the distributor cap or should it be just before it? I guess the spark is controlled by the points opening and closing and since I am seeing a spark the rotor and cap must be close enough for the spark to bridge the gap.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well I put a new starter in and that got her going. However, she's running pretty rough and keeps dying. I noticed a small amount of smoke coming out of the top coolant pipe. From what I can tell its exhaust smoke. That pretty much means it has a blown head gasket right? Most likely why she was parked.
 

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If you don't have a compression gauge, rent one (Autozone, etc.). That way you can find the bad cylinder/s. If it's just one, you can pull that plug wire and maybe keep it running for a bit.
 

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You should buy a compression tester at the auto parts store. Over the years you will use it a lot.

I can guarantee the carb will need to be rebuilt and have some passages cleaned out. Like any other carb you should see fuel squirt into the bores when you open the throttle. Also the idle speed should change when you turn the mixture screws. You won't see that though. The passages are extremely small on autolite carbs. They clog up even from several weeks of not driving. I use a welding tip cleaner for oxyacetylene welders.
 

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Smoke coming from a coolant pipe? Maybe steam? Is the cooling system even clean and full? Pictures are helpful.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Smoke coming from a coolant pipe? Maybe steam? Is the cooling system even clean and full? Pictures are helpful.
It could very well be steam. I'll get you some pictures tomorrow after I go and rent a compression gauge. Thanks for the help everyone
 

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