Vintage Mustang Forums banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm working on my 65 coupe and want to replace all of the electrical while I still have the engine and interior out, but I'm not sure which wiring harness is the best option for me. I'm not adding power windows or anything so I don't need a mod/update kit. Would something like this kit be sufficient if I'm not adding anything extra? 14 Circuit Ford Wire Harness

Any advice and other recommendations are appreciated
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
I'm working on my 65 coupe and want to replace all of the electrical while I still have the engine and interior out, but I'm not sure which wiring harness is the best option for me. I'm not adding power windows or anything so I don't need a mod/update kit. Would something like this kit be sufficient if I'm not adding anything extra? 14 Circuit Ford Wire Harness

Any advice and other recommendations are appreciated
I purchased the EZ Wiring kit which is similar to that. I had to purchase/reuse bulb sockets and other connections. Overall, I am pleased with the outcome but if I had to do it all over I would probably go the Painless Performance route. I would also suggest buying a kit with more fuses/wiring than you need and just rolling up whatever you don't use. You may want to add stuff later and having the wires available really helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,168 Posts
If you are going back stock, there is (IMO) no reason to really shop beyond the Alloy Metal Products harnesses available at NPD. They may cost a bit more, but the quality is excellent and they track exactly with the originals so they're easy to install and trace.
The AMP harnesses are pretty darn good. You may find, however, that they aren't an exact replica of what you've got in your car--but that doesn't mean they are wrong. Like me, you may find that people have buggered with your car's wiring and you'll have some clean up to do. Regardless, the AMP harnesses are fairly painless overall and can be plug-and-play if you're disciplined about labeling the old stuff before you take it out.

I haven't worked with Midlife, but I've heard only good things about him and his harness restoration. That's an option for sure, if you're looking to preserve a certain wiring modification or something.
 

·
Registered
1966 Coupe
Joined
·
87 Posts
The AMP harnesses are pretty darn good. You may find, however, that they aren't an exact replica of what you've got in your car--but that doesn't mean they are wrong. Like me, you may find that people have buggered with your car's wiring and you'll have some clean up to do. Regardless, the AMP harnesses are fairly painless overall and can be plug-and-play if you're disciplined about labeling the old stuff before you take it out.

I haven't worked with Midlife, but I've heard only good things about him and his harness restoration. That's an option for sure, if you're looking to preserve a certain wiring modification or something.
What about American Autowire, for non original, are they a good harness?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,168 Posts
What about American Autowire, for non original, are they a good harness?
Never worked with American Autowire, but I've heard good things about them--at least, their harness quality. They seem to be in the same classification as Painless Wiring, which is less focused on replicating stock harnesses and more focused on being a dynamic application for restomods or cars with upgraded components. Somebody who has worked with either Painless or AA should chime in and confirm this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,162 Posts
The AMP harnesses are pretty darn good. You may find, however, that they aren't an exact replica of what you've got in your car--but that doesn't mean they are wrong. Like me, you may find that people have buggered with your car's wiring and you'll have some clean up to do. Regardless, the AMP harnesses are fairly painless overall and can be plug-and-play if you're disciplined about labeling the old stuff before you take it out.

I haven't worked with Midlife, but I've heard only good things about him and his harness restoration. That's an option for sure, if you're looking to preserve a certain wiring modification or something.
Sure, that's true - if your wiring is non-stock, they won't 100% jive. Of course, the wiring diagrams that are available new are a God-send when rewiring our cars. But you're right - I'm referring to stock wiring configurations.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
506 Posts
What about American Autowire, for non original, are they a good harness?
I have one and would use it again in a heartbeat. Installation is pretty straightforward, and covered here in a few posts by members. Also, they provide plenty of wire that allows for flexibility routing the harness in the engine compartment. So if you want it hidden, that is possible. Adding modern conveniences like power windows/locks and other circuits is already included.

Rusty
 
  • Like
Reactions: emk65

·
Registered
Joined
·
38,218 Posts
On the '65 project we're currently working on, we're cleaning the harness and wires with GoJo (non abrasive version) which cleans and "reconstitutes" the plastic insulation, replacing any terminal ends, repairing any breaks, rewrapping and taping and, from the looks, we'll be re-using 98% of the original wiring while modifying it for relays to control headlights, horn, electric choke and solid-state ignition feed.
 

·
Registered
1966 Coupe
Joined
·
87 Posts
I have one and would use it again in a heartbeat. Installation is pretty straightforward, and covered here in a few posts by members. Also, they provide plenty of wire that allows for flexibility routing the harness in the engine compartment. So if you want it hidden, that is possible. Adding modern conveniences like power windows/locks and other circuits is already included.

Rusty
thanks Rusty
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thank you all so much! Going to compare the all of the suggested options :) hopefully I'll have the job finished and the car running by the end of July if time permits
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
222 Posts
Since you are staying close to stock if you have your original under dash harness I cannot say enough good about midlife harness. have him go over your original harness making all repairs to the under dash harness then buy all the other harnesses that you need and plug and play.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,177 Posts
I just bought the Scott Drake upgraded wiring harness with larger fuse box and built in relays . It is a plug and play harness
 

Attachments

  • Like
Reactions: emk65

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Plus one for Alloy Metal Products harnesses via NPD. I replaced everything except the steering column wires in my '66, and couldn't be happier with the result. All connectors matched the originals. All wires the correct length. All colors tracked with the original diagrams as well. No crimping or any of that needed. It looks stock, because it pretty much is. Also, American made stuff!

Only issue I had, and this was overcome with research, was the running production variations Ford made during 1966 (for example; there were multiple versions of the under-dash harness used in '66, depending on build date). And this was easy to solve, since I was replacing everything, by just getting the last versions of the '66 harnesses and talking with the NPD guys. For '65, this might not be an issue at all.

I also, since I was in there, replaced any questionable parts (voltage regulator, headlight switch with NoS, heater fan switch) that could be worn or faulty. And added some things here and there, like the radio noise filter.

And now for me, everything works, including the much-maligned AMP gauge. Dash lights are bright, turn signals aren't slow, alternator charges fine - all good. Next I'll be installing relays for the headlights I plan to run (probably 6024s - 35watt low/60 watt hi beam). Relays will take a load off the headlight switch and the wires themselves -- the kit I plan on using won't require cutting into the headlight feed and is easily concealable.

One tip I'd make, is to test fit some things together prior to installation. New wires and parts are pretty tight, I mean really tight, especially the firewall connectors, and the headlight switch connector. Fit them together once, then separate them on the bench and that'll ease final installation.

A final word - old wiring is a potential safety issue that can spur a car-b-que. These cars are very old, and have a varied history of previous owners doing stupid things to them. My wiring had some bizarre modifications and poor connections (often just wires twisted together with a bit of E tape to protect it). I also found numerous wires that were corroded inside the insulation, and toasted as well. It was one of those "oh my God, I'm so glad I'm doing this" experiences... So gut the old stuff and make your car safe!

Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,832 Posts
On the '65 project we're currently working on, we're cleaning the harness and wires with GoJo (non abrasive version) which cleans and "reconstitutes" the plastic insulation, replacing any terminal ends, repairing any breaks, rewrapping and taping and, from the looks, we'll be re-using 98% of the original wiring while modifying it for relays to control headlights, horn, electric choke and solid-state ignition feed.
@Woodchuck , you mentioned replacing terminal ends. Have you found a good source for original style connectors? I've spent hours over the years hunting without much luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,832 Posts
@emk65 I don't have a vendor product to recommend.

My thought to add to this thread is that if you're not auto electrically inclined a reproduction or midlife restored harness may save a lot of frustration. You will also then be able to go back and refer to original wiring diagrams if you need to trouble shoot later.

If you go the painless or similar products route you need to rely on your memory, documentation and troubleshooting skills.

Also. if you do go with a repo, consider taking that old harness and putting it in a box on a shelf. The wiring diagrams are fine but having an old harness to spread out on the workbench can save a bunch of time/crawling around under the dash with mirrors and flashlights. (the "spare" terminal ends may come in handy someday too)

There is no one right answer to which way to go with this. You're doing the right thing to address it now while it is all apart.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top