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Discussion Starter #1
I have come across a real find. A friend of mine, who works for a law firm, is handling the liquidation of an estate which includes a 66 C code convertible. She knew I had an interest in vintage Stangs so called me to check it out.

The car has been in a garage in Colorado (dry) since 1977 when it was last plated. The odometer reads 22,371 which is probably original miles because the pedal rubber shows no wear. The car still has the local dealer emblem. Unfortunately I cannot document the mileage. Structurally the car is in excellent shape. There is no rust to be found anywhere on the car. There is a large, but very fixable, dent in the middle/front of the right door that includes part of the right fender. The door works fine, no glass is broken.

The wiring is fine, no dry rot. The rubber trim is good and the top looks new.

The car is sitting on 4 flat tires. Fortunately someone took the battery out. The question I have is what has to be done with the fluids (gas, oil, coolant) to get the car running again. Do I have to change gas tanks and fuel lines? What about suspension, will the springs need to be changed?

Details: Auto, PS, Emblerglo, parchment std interior, visibility package, 6 rear axel (2.80:1 ???)and somebody added after market cruise control.

Weave
 

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I'm sure the gas, if there is even any left in there, has turned to a not so gaslike substance, so that will have to be drained out. I would just leave the original tank unless it starts causing you problems. change the oil, and prime the engine by turning the oil pump manualy... I'm sure all the oil has drained out of that motor and is all in the oil pan.

I would bet the tires are dry-rotted, so you might want to get new ones if you plan on going any farther than the bottom of the driveway.

sounds like an awsome find!

- Jason
 

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The first thing you should do is remove all of the rubber brake lines to the wheel cylinders, drain and flush the brake fluid. Replace the brake hoses with new, replace the brake fluid, bleed and test brakes.

The rubber hoses are likely dry rotted. Your brake fluid will be contaminated by water vapor at this point (which can cause the fluid to boil when the brakes get hot...leading to brake failure).

The gas tank may very well have pinholes in the top of it due to vapor condensation inside the tank...so replacing it would be wise. I'll leave the engine start up procedure to someone who knows more than me...But I would consider rebuilding the carb before I even tried to start it.

Phil
 

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I once bought a parts car. the engine had about 125,000 miles on and had not been run in something like 16 years. I connected a can of fresh gas and cleaned the oxidation off the points and the sucker fired right up and ran well!

How ever I would not recomend doing this. Do as mrsiv says. Take the plugs out, squirt some oil into each cylinder, put fesh oil in and oil in a new filter. Crank the car over with out the plugs to lube the cylinder walls and to get oil pressure through out the engine and valve train. Flush the carb out or preferable rebuild it.

Most important though! Before you ever drive it, rebuild the whole brake system!
 

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I am RIGHT where u are headed. My car had sit for 20 years.

Plan on replacing the entire breaking system. You may be able to save the hard lines but you may not be able to get the soft lines off the hard lines without ruining them. BUY a breakline wrench!

Plan on a redoing the fuel system. I had a few little pin holes and at first figured no big deal, they can me filled for now. Well I ended up replacing since I was doing some trunk work anyway. WELL... once I had it out dumped out the "gas" that was left and about a POUND of rust/sludge fell out! I took off the fuel pump hose and blew out the line and it looked like brown paint! Even the gas filler tube was rusty.

I ran the fuel pump line into a gas can to test the engine (after the hand priming) and it did start but ran poorly. So I took the carb apart and there was SO much gum and varnish I had to scrap it off with a screw driver. I ended up replacing the carb (thanks Eaglekepr).

Once I did these things I was able to get it running and had it one the hiway earlier this week.

But dont let this slow you down. The vert sounds like a great find.

James
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the reply. Did you have any issues with the coolant. I would think over time that it would become gummy. I have another radiator so that's no beig deal, but it seems the water chambers in the engine could gum up with old coolant. Did you experience this?
 
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