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Discussion Starter #1
Im sure this subject has been covered before. I want to restore my own 66 mustang woodgrain pony wheel. Small section of plastic missing. Whats best to use to fill in missing section ? How can i redoe the fake woodgrain look after i fix cracks ? If anyone has step by step process let me know. Checked youtube saw one video but its not complete or in depth . Bob
 

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What I read recently was using pretty much any two-part epoxy to fill the gaps, painting it a base-coat lighter brown, let dry, then using a rag or a short bristled brush to wipe on a darker brown in a single pass all the way around, let dry and apply clear coats.
 

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I have restored 4 of these over the past 5 years. I use JB Weld epoxy and have not seen any cracks to date. One thing I do is drill a small horizontally into each side of the crack. Acts as sort of an anchor point for the JB Weld when I pour it in. I also use myfirstcar66's method of painting. You won't get an exact match to the factory finish but if you take your time you can get a really nice wood finish.
 

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I've done a few myself, but I take a back seat to professionals, who can achieve results like this
742765
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I have restored 4 of these over the past 5 years. I use JB Weld epoxy and have not seen any cracks to date. One thing I do is drill a small horizontally into each side of the crack. Acts as sort of an anchor point for the JB Weld when I pour it in. I also use myfirstcar66's method of painting. You won't get an exact match to the factory finish but if you take your time you can get a really nice wood finish.
I have restored 4 of these over the past 5 years. I use JB Weld epoxy and have not seen any cracks to date. One thing I do is drill a small horizontally into each side of the crack. Acts as sort of an anchor point for the JB Weld when I pour it in. I also use myfirstcar66's method of painting. You won't get an exact match to the factory finish but if you take your time you can get a really nice wood finish.
Looks Great. What method of painting do you use ?? Do you sand the whole wheel before paint ? What kind of paint ?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
do you sand the j
What I read recently was using pretty much any two-part epoxy to fill the gaps, painting it a base-coat lighter brown, let dry, then using a rag or a short bristled brush to wipe on a darker brown in a single pass all the way around, let dry and apply clear coa
What I read recently was using pretty much any two-part epoxy to fill the gaps, painting it a base-coat lighter brown, let dry, then using a rag or a short bristled brush to wipe on a darker brown in a single pass all the way around, let dry and apply clear coats.
Do you sand the JB weld or epoxy to shape the part missing ? then do you sand the whole wheel rim ? what specific paints did you use ? does any kind of primer go down first ? What kind of clear is used ?
 

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Well, yeah you'd need to sand the epoxy, give a slight roughing to the original stuff. I'm sure you'd benefit from some primer, basecoat, grain color and clear that are designed to work together like SEM lacquers.
 

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After trying a few things to contain the expoxy as I poured it in, I wound up using aluminun furnace tape because it held its shape better. All I did was wrap a piece around the area I was filling with expoxy, used a dremel tool with a sanding drum to rough out the shape and then used just sandpaper to finish the shaping. Keep in mind you have to mask off all areas around the area you are working on. After finish shaping I sanded the entire wheel, used 1/8 inch pin striping tape to mask the stainless trim rim and masking tape to cover the spokes. Then used an acrylic primer. For color paint, I used acrylic paint from an art store. I used a brush for the light under color, let it dry for about 30 minutes then applied the darker top coat using a piece of sponge in long strokes until I got the finish I wanted. Don't get me wrong, many times I had to let it dry and then sanded it off because I didn't like how it came out. Once I got the finish I wanted, I put on a few coats of satin clear.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
After trying a few things to contain the expoxy as I poured it in, I wound up using aluminun furnace tape because it held its shape better. All I did was wrap a piece around the area I was filling with expoxy, used a dremel tool with a sanding drum to rough out the shape and then used just sandpaper to finish the shaping. Keep in mind you have to mask off all areas around the area you are working on. After finish shaping I sanded the entire wheel, used 1/8 inch pin striping tape to mask the stainless trim rim and masking tape to cover the spokes. Then used an acrylic primer. For color paint, I used acrylic paint from an art store. I used a brush for the light under color, let it dry for about 30 minutes then applied the darker top coat using a piece of sponge in long strokes until I got the finish I wanted. Don't get me wrong, many times I had to let it dry and then sanded it off because I didn't like how it came out. Once I got the finish I wanted, I put on a few coats of satin clear.
Sounds easy enough. Thanks for detailed steps.
 

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PICTURES !!!!
 

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I don't have any pictures of using the aluminum tape or pouring the epoxy. These photos are of another wheel I did for a buddy who wanted a darker walnut shade on the wheel. It had multiple cracks and missing some pieces of the wheel. The spokes were in terrible shape with a lot of rust. Once I sanded them, removed the rust and filled the pitting, I sprayed them in a stainless steel finish.
 

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