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I am new to this site, and new to the Classic Mustang world. I have a 1966 coupe that was purchased for a project to build for my 13 year old daughter. This car is all there, Pony interior, air, automatic, 2892V, rear posi, radio antenna on the trunk. In looking at my $2000 purchase, I see that all 4 corners of the frame need replaced due to rust, most all of the sheet metal, including floor pans need replaced. The hood, trunk lid, roof, and right door appear fine. Most of the chrome needs work, etc. I have a large task and project in front of me. Should I try to cut my losses now, or is the car worth all of the work. I can do about 90% of the work, sheet metal, body prep, transmission, motor, etc. I need to know if this car is worth the time, energy, and money invested to make a non show, daily driver for my daughter. Or could I invest like dollars into a better project car. Did I make a mistake. Any opinion would be appreciated. Thanks
 

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It is always cheaper to buy the car you want than to take a lesser car and fix it into the car you want. We're all about and all for fixing old mustangs on this board...but it's mostly because we are just "ate up" with fixing old mustangs.

You're looking at several hundred hours and several thousand dollars to fix the car you describe. :

You probably ought to sell it if you are trying to make the best financial decission.

Phil
 

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i agree with phil..your 66 sounds smilar to my 65 fastback..without the front frame rot.., but i bought it because i like woking on em, and no plans to sell it and "come out ahead"..also i have the advantage of my brothers bodyshop, with all the equipment at my disposal..example...frame machine..welders..spray booth..etc. if i buy one for my daughter (shes 15)..its not gonna need much..cant afford 2 projects..lol..good luck..by the way..not sure where you aquried this one, but look for a rust free west, or southern car to buy and have shipped too you,purchase price should be similar, then shipping, but shipping is cheaper than rust repair...just my opinion..
 

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Wonder what !0% you can't do and what will that xost you?
Is it the paint job? After you do the body AND paint prep you'll be looking at 6-700 at Macco and only Macco. Regular shop won't touch it.
If you are really wondering, put it back on the market andd see what happens..probably won't sell for 2k again, especially if it's looked at by someone who knows about these cars. The frame rails would of made all of us walk away at 2k.
Consider the time it will take you and the tieing up of garage space for quite a while and the drain on your wallet..all of which will be alot!!
Sell it for whatever, take some time to get the most you can...then look over the next car alot closer....Besides, most fathers don't want sons/ddaughters ddriving cars with poor break systems/ spear-o-matic steering columns and gas tanks subject to fill drivers seat with gas/fire...
 

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I agree with the others to an extent. Will your daughter be helping you with the project? That right there is priceless if she is.

My daughter, when she was 15-16 helped me build my car, and wanted one of her one. So we bought her a $1500 '69 coupe (although that car was probably the deal of the century), and she (with my help) fixed it up. I've done the same with my son's $200 '65 coupe.

Yes, you probably spent too much for the car, given the rust, but, if it were me, I'd call what's done, done, and start the project. The time you'll get to spend with your daughter in the garage is priceless. And when you're done ... she can't be taken advantage of by non-ethical mechanics, 'cause she'll know as much as them.

I'd also guarantee, that she will love the car when done, having done the work herself. My daughter is now 18, and I don't think anyone could offer her enough for her '69 for her to ever part with it ... now you could offer ME enough, though *LOL*
 

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Lets look at bth sides. #1. What does your daughter think of the car...That is very important.
#2 Will she appreciate all the work that goes into the car...
Sounds to me like you are itching to do the car for"Her"??
I would build the car. If you can do most of the work, you will save a lot of money. And, you will know what the child has when she is out.
You have alreadt spent the money, so forget about that...
You could buy her a Honda??? and the repairs to keep it running for a couple of years would probably amount to what the resto. on the Mustang will cost, and you still won't have anything...
Bottom line is, you bought the car with good intentions. Don't back out now...Just DO It....
 

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Take a hard look at the distance you have to go to reach your goal of a reliable daily driver. The problem in doing one of these is if you're like me you can't resist fixing everything you see thats wrong. If you take this approach, the project is going to be expensive in both parts and labor. The best thing I can tell you is to look at every part on the car you can see and decide if you'd plan on replacing it. Then make up a spreadsheet or list and get out some parts catalogs and start adding up the parts cost. Once you have your best guess, then whatever you think it will take, double it. However long you think it will take to do the job, double it. If the job still looks achievable then go for it and don't look back! OTOH, if you suspect its more costly than you initially thought and are considering bailing out, now is the time to bail out. The best car you can find is often the cheapest one to restore.
 
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Thanks for all of the great information. All very helpful. That is the reason for posting. I needed some experiance to help me make a decision on this car.

I will give this project some thought over the next few weeks. I am not bored or in need of more work.
I have several opportunities to bond with my children on a daily basis, and do. I also have projects that are ongoing, such as a Classic Bronco, and a very clean Turbo Seca bike.

So the real question to me is, time, money, and energy.
How much of each do I have, and and how much am I willing to let go of.

I am still interested in anybodys thoughts or ideas. Thanks again

Dave Wixom
 
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