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Discussion Starter #1
Next week I plan to update my daily driver from a single to dual master cylinder. I have seen alot of info on this but am looking for a couple of specifics. I have drums on all four corners. I am looking to use a 67 dual MC (manual drum)and I believe I just need a "t" for the front brakes, plumb into the MC and then run the back line straight into second reservior of the MC. Will this work? I know I can't use my distro block currently in the car. Do I need a propotioning valve/distro block for this to work properly? Am I going to have lock-up, or better yet, does the 67 dual MC manual drum brake system use a distro block or proportioning valve in it's application? Any help in this matter would be greatly appreciated.
 

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You don't need a propotioning valve because you're still running drum brakes. All you need is a T-block that joins the front and rear chambers of the MC lines.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
I was told just to use my old t-block for the fronts,and block off the when the T-block runs to the rear.And run the rears right to the M/C.Is that right?

SCOOP
 
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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the info....one more question. I suppose the design of the 67 drum/dual MC puts equal pressure on all four corners or is it pre adjusted to apply more to the front brakes?
 

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A drum MC should apply equal pressure to all 4 tires.
Drum brakes require less pressure than discs, so that's why the proporting valve is needed when a front disc, rear drum setup is used with a disc brake MC.
 
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Discussion Starter #7
Great info. You all filled in the gaps for me just fine.....
2bav8....great site, will spend some time there tonight. My car is restored to be as original as possible, but in the next couple of years looking to find some "torque"
thanks to all again
 

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If you don't know already you will need to use the '66 push rod in the '67 master cyl. Some of the push rods are almost impossible to get out of the new/reman. '67 master cyls. If you can buy a '67 master cyl. without the pushrod installed it will make your life easier.
 

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Here's an old post of mine with pics showing how I did the single-dual conversion. In my case I had the 67 distribution block (freebie from a fellow VMFer!). But I've seen folks route the back brakes directly to the front port of the MC too, seems to work fine. Good luck!
 
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Discussion Starter #10
Went to your site. Cool Mustang. That is approx the color red that I am planning to paint my 66 Coupe. I was wondering what it would like to paint he bumpers - yours is the first that I've seen. Now that I've seen it I like it. I wonder how it would look with a vinyl top. How did you prep the chrome to take the paint? Or did you let a body shop do it? I plan on doing all of the work including shooting the paint myself. It is hard to tell from the picture but are your bumpers molded to the body, or are they still on the hangers?

Dave
 

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Actually, the bumbers are fiberglass. Painting chrome bumpers would take a lot of work removing the chrome so paint would stick.

Other than the material, they mount identical to the stock steel bumpers. E-mail me if you have any other questions.
 

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Be certain to buy a 67 or 68 master cylinder designed for drum brakes - NOT a disk/drum combo. Also as was previously mentioned get one that has the push rod out of the assembly (PepBoys sells them this way). I would recommend a 67 or up distribution block (but many on the forum run the rear brakes directly off of the rear port). I just did this two weekends ago. I had a shop adjust everything after I did all the basic install and bleeding. Stops on a dime (or maybe a nickel).

When I bench bled my master cylinder it sure seemed to me that fluid was trasfering between the front and rear, so a 67 or up distribution block adds one more layer of safety. However, many on this forum don't use this method and at least one (350GT?) uses the rear port method and lost the rear brakes and had no probelms stopping with the fronts - so it does not seem to be critical. You can however hook up a brake warning light that will alert you to a pressure loss in either side if you use a 67 and up distribution block.

John Harvey
 

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I just completed this conversion on my 65. I installed a 67 m/c, using the 65 distribution block. What I did was to remove the front-to-rear line from where it screwed into the dist. block and put a plug there. I used the reservoir at the firewall end of the m/c/ to plumb to the dist. block, and I used the leading/front/engine end reservoir to plumb to a reducer and coupling connecting to the front-to0rear line. I used a 67 m/c brake line set - the little shorties that go to the dist. block. I did this because the fitting inlet size on the 67 m/c is different than the size on the 65 single reservoir m/c. Be sure to bleed the m/c before hooking up to the dist. block and front-to-rear line. I did this by purchasing a 18 inch or slightly shorter brake line with fittings already on it, one of each size (the m/c has different sized fittings for each reservoir.) Then, I looped the line so it went back into each reservoir. Filled the resr. and put 200 strokes of the pedal to bleed all the air out of the m/c. good luck. The m/c rod was fine, using the 67 rod that was already in the m/c
 
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