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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, happy new year!
i have a 67 289 with hydraulic followers, the issue i have is, according to the haynes workshop manual they need adjusting, its all a bit confusing because i thought the fact that the followers were hydraulic, they didnt need adjusting,
perhaps there's someone out there can guide me in good old fashioned english how i do this please,
thanks in advance,
mark
 

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Generally they only need adjusting initially and then don’t need to be adjusted after that (as long as the lifters are working properly).

Your manual should have the specs, but the basic procedure is to tighten each rocker arm with the corresponding valve fully closed. The rocker arm adjusters are tightened 1/2 to 3/4 (check your specs) of a turn once all play is taken out of the pushrod (you can twist the pushrod while tightening the rocker arm to feel for play). This is all from memory, so check your manual for the exact details.

They can also be adjusted with the engine running, but it is a messy procedure.
 

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Is this a new installation or an effort to quiet noisy lifters? You don't state why you want to adjust them. They don't need routine adjusting as a normal maintenance operation and don't require anything if you are not addressing one of the two conditions I asked about.
 

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I've posted this many times, once more won't hurt. Until Ford switched to the shoulder-type studs, the lifters could and should be adjusted.

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Do this, and it will run smoothly, and likely with more power:


Disconnect the coil + wire.

Attach a bump switch to the solenoid, or just use a screwdriver.

Turn the engine so the #1 intake valve is fully opened. Loosen the exhaust valve until you can move the #1 exhaust valve pushrod up and down (NOT spinning).
Tighten this valve until no up and down movement can be felt, then tighten an additional 3/4 turn.


Note: Spinning the pushrod can cause a false adjustment, as a slowly collapsing lifter can allow the pushrod to spin freely, thus throwing off the base line of your adjustment.

Turn the engine so the #1 exhaust valve is fully opened. Loosen the intake valve until you can move the #1 intake valve pushrod up and down (again, NOT spinning).
Tighten this valve until no up and down movement can be felt, then tighten an additional 3/4 turn.

Repeat for the other 7 cylinders.

I did this on a friend’s engine that had been adjusted when built, then driven for several years. It was running OK, but not great, you could hear some valve noise. After doing the above, it did not seem to be much better immediately after adjustment, mostly because the lifters had been varnished into position by years of driving. Coupla miles around the block, though, and it was a whole 'nother engine.


Adjusting mechanical valves.

I drove a 289HP daily for 20 years, and every 6000 miles I adjusted the valves, which took less than an hour.

Adjusted properly, they aren't noisy, either, just a high-pitched singing sound.

Factory spec for the 289HP C3OZ-6250-C cam is .022" cold, .018" hot.

The procedure in the Manual is a bit complicated, and involves marking the balancer at 90° points, and then you follow some weird pattern, like I1, E4, I6, E2, or some complex crap. Takes an hour just to figure out what they want you to do.

Do this instead-

Run the engine until it is a full operating temperature. Disconnect the coil + wire.

Attach a bump switch to the solenoid, or just use a screwdriver.

Bump the starter until the second valve on the #1 cylinder is all the way open. This means the one closest to the radiator is closed, on the base circle of the cam lobe. Adjust the valve to .018".

Bump the starter until that valve is fully open, and adjust the second valve.

Continue to adjust the valves in pairs until the RH head is adjusted, and install the valve cover.

Repeat the process on the LH side of the engine. I like to start and run the engine to be sure it is still fully warmed up.

Remove the LH valve cover, and adjust the LH valves to .018".

Very quick, and very accurate.

If the engine has just been assembled, do the procedure cold, at .022”. Then warm up the engine and do it hot.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
thanks guys,
the reason im asking is that i have recently purchased the car and it has been off the road for about 10 years. one or two lifters seem to empty over night and clatter on first start up, another one or two appear to clatter when the engine is hot. so i was wondering if they need adjusting or replacement. ive done an oil and filter change , but has not made much differnce,
any ideas guys?
thank you in advance
 
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