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Discussion Starter #1
So I'm converting my '68 coupe into a fastback, I picked up a donor structure a couple weeks ago, and ordered new quarters and roof panel. The roof panel arrived yesterday, but is does not have the pins welded in for the molding clips at the windsheild and rear window area.

I'm curious how others have dealt with this...
Years ago I made up a rear window channel, and simply drill holes, stuck a shortened stainless nail through the hole, and welded it from the backside. It hasn't given me any problems, but just wondering if there is a better way.

Also, has anyone installed one of new these roof panels? if so how did you deal with welding the gutter area as this was normally pinch welded at the factory.

Thanks,
 

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White Elephant Guy
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Wow, I didn't realize the whole "make your coupe into a fastback" thing was getting so popular, now I know how the guys with real Shelby's feel.
 

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After most of the coupes are converted to FB's and verts then my coupe will be more valuable ::
 

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If you know someone that has a pin welder, they come with those pins. They also come with a special attachment head used to weld them on the car. I have used mine to replace them and it works great. You could also just do it like all 65 mustangs and drill a hole and use screws to install the clips.

BTW: I am also in the process of a fastback conversion. I feel you guys that look down on these restorations are wrong. People in this hobby have been preaching for years to restore the old classics instead of crushing them. That is what we are doing. My fastback was way beyond repair but with a coupe donor it will be back and better than ever. It's really no different than adding AC or PS to a car that never had it. I am just adding the fastback option. One more thing, I know for a fact that there are tons of "restored" shiny fastbacks that are about to split in half. It's funny those cars will get more respect than a rust free conversion.


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Discussion Starter #5
Larry, Thanks for the pin welder info... With the roof off It sounds like I can probably get one of the local body shops to install them for me. As a backup, I'll look into finding the screw in style as well, but I think I like the welded pin method much better.

In regards to the idea of fastback cloning, My sediments exactly... My donor car had been sitting in dirt for many years and was simply rotting away from the bottom up. In my opinion, I'm preserving classic ford lines using my current rolling chassis. I view my car as more of a street rod skinned in a Mustang body... These days nothing is sacred, but original will always be original. So "original" owners should have nothing to fear.

Thanks again...
 

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Stangg, your 68 looks nice! I wouldn't worry what others think about the conversion, it's your car do what YOU want with it. With that said, If you ever sell the car, I believe in full disclosure with everything that has been done to the car. Would sure like to see more pics of the car?? [email protected]
 

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Stangg,

You mentioned a donor structure. It that the inside panels? I found a T code coupe that has a straight frame but it pretty much gutted and lots of bondo in the quarters, so I was thinking about buying the fastback panels, but I guess I would need the inside panels, or would just have to fab some.
 

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White Elephant Guy
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I don't look at it as wrong at all, if anything it looks like a severe PITA and I wish you the best of luck. I just never realized how popular the fastbacks are, considering that whenever I go to a car show or cruise I am lucky to see 1 or 2. Maybe it's just a PA thing...
 

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"considering that whenever I go to a car show or cruise I am lucky to see 1 or 2. Maybe it's just a PA thing..."

No not a PA thing. I find the same here in Texas. Very few fastbacks left on the road, or in car shows. That's why I am in the process of saving one that should have been crushed years ago. BTW: It's less of a pain than replacing the whole bottom of a rust bucket. Plus it makes a better car. JMHO

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They never made all that many of them in the first place and that was total production for the world! Add 40 years, rust, not really being held as classics until only a few years ago, importers looking to send everything overseas and the car is quite rare.

As for the conversion thing, thats OK.. I saved a rare Type 3 Karmann Ghia years ago that was rotting since he PO had stripped the paint off and let it sit in the New Jersey muck for 15 years... He did leave the paint on the rare factory optioned electric sliding steel sunroof... So I bought the car, cut off the roof and put it on my own type three Karmann ghia.. Yep, I added it as an option 38 years later.. The car would have easily been crushed if I had not done that.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I think you'll need the donor structure regardless, since it dictates the roof placement, door seals, quarter, rear window and trunk placement. That would be quite a challenge to fab all from scratch.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I can see where some would see it as a pain... but I've already been through the worst on this car (cowls), and working on the topside of the car is so much easier.

Regarding body types, at the shows they seem about even to me, but on the street I typically see convertibles and coupes.
 
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