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Discussion Starter #181
The next step was removing the support at the front suspension so that I could bolt on the front suspension and place the strut rod braces for welding. This was a big step I was working toward because I wanted to make sure the car was welded together pretty solid before rotating the car up to remove the front support because the scissor jack at each rocker panel can only be raised one at a time, therefore imparting a torsion on the car.

Here's the car with only the front leaf spring support and the rocker panel scissor jacks supporting the car.
20200427_160350 by 7T02S, on Flickr

Front support removed
20200427_162558 by 7T02S, on Flickr

Next was lowering the car down to a rake stance using the level chassis jig as a reference to ground level finally. I then bolted up the new front coilover suspension. Starting at the top, the tolerance of these aluminum spacers were pretty tight so I had to clearance out the front of the spacers on both sides in order to get them to bolt up, since the holes were quite a ways off after transfer punching from the top side. Not sure why the clearances on the inside of the spacers are so tight but maybe both of my upper spring pockets were welded way off from the factory. Still, would be nice to have the tolerance loosened up. They were just way too tight on the inside dimensions against the outside dimensions of the factory upper spring perches.
20200428_175254 by 7T02S, on Flickr

20200428_191753 by 7T02S, on Flickr

But once I got the upper shock mounts in place after opening up the holes and clearancing the aluminum spacers, everything else bolted together pretty nicely!
20200427_192511 by 7T02S, on Flickr

Starting to feel a bit like a real car with some suspension bolted up!
 

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Discussion Starter #182 (Edited)
Next was figuring out where the strut rod braces needed to be. I started by putting back together the factory pieces and taking some measurements. The first was getting 110 degrees between the strut rod mounting flanges.
20200502_122057 by 7T02S, on Flickr

This equates to 35 degrees between the bracket and the frame (110/2 = 55) then (90-55 = 35). If you look closely, I have 35 degrees dialed in with the speed square.
2020-05-08_06-59-55 by 7T02S, on Flickr

I then set up the center of the strut rod bracket mounting flanges to 19.125"/2 = 9.563" apart. 19.125" is the center dimension between the lower control arm slot centers and also the dimension between the factory strut rod brace centers. I made a silver sharpie mark at the center then set them equal with the LCA slot center.
20200502_144552 by 7T02S, on Flickr

With an angle and a dimension like above, that should be enough to lock in the measurements. The other thing I noted for reference was this hole edge was 2" from the frame and 2" from the sway bar bracket. That's also good for reference to make sure both sides are equal.
20200502_144420 by 7T02S, on Flickr

With those dimensions, I prepped everything for welding after confirming the measurements working fine with the suspension bolted in place. Not shown is the welding but I've already welded it in but this picture shows the plug weld holes that are then followed up by fillet welds.
20200505_162420 by 7T02S, on Flickr
 

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Wow. Not sure how I I've missed this outstanding thread. What an undertaking. Your metal and writing skills are top notch. Be proud of your work, you'll be driving it before you know it. Kudos brother.
 

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Discussion Starter #184
Wow. Not sure how I I've missed this outstanding thread. What an undertaking. Your metal and writing skills are top notch. Be proud of your work, you'll be driving it before you know it. Kudos brother.
Thanks for the kind words rpm! The metal skills have improved as I go, I can definitely tell a difference in both the quality of my welds but also my confidence going into a weld has gone up too. Practice, practice, practice they say! Cheers!
 

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Discussion Starter #186
I'm going to fill the roof-to-quarter seam by welding in strips of sheetmetal, instead of lead or filler. I am using the original rear-window filler panel to make it from, as it has both the right curve and has a 90 degree bend already.

I started by making a template with plastic and transferring it. I made sure it was extra big so I could fit the metal afterwards to the car. I transferred the pattern by using a razor blade - it cut the plastic and left a print on the sheet metal that I later traced with a pen so I could see the line when cutting.
20200509_112228 by 7T02S, on Flickr

20200509_112948 by 7T02S, on Flickr

Cut it out with a cutoff wheel.
20200509_115157 by 7T02S, on Flickr

I'm pretty happy with the fit and think it'll weld in nice.
2020-05-16_08-13-55 by 7T02S, on Flickr
20200510_141227 by 7T02S, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter #188
Thanks so much for all the details with these posts. I am hoping to one day do a 67 and these will be handy!
You're welcome! I figure others may be able to benifit from my journey but I also see it as a way to document my own journey for future reference and memories. It's one thing to take photos but without the story, certain clarity gets lost later on. It's not just a build "thread," it's like a build journal/diary.
 

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Discussion Starter #189
Time for an update. I started going back into the office about 4 weeks ago and my progress slowed down but the 8 weeks I was working from home, I gained a LOT of momentum and worked nearly every day on the mustang - for 8 weeks.

Biggest update as of yesterday - I have my engine back!!! I will update later on since I have a few pictures to update with first.

I also have my wheels and tires now. I spent a bunch of time figuring out what wheels to buy and what sizes and offsets to go with. A exeptionally nice forum member let me borrow his Wheelrite fitment tool, so I has able to determine the best front tire size, which ended up being 225/50/17 on a 7.5" wheel with about 5" backspacing after throwing in a thin spacer. The popular tire seems to be 245/45/17 but I don't see that working well with a lowered stance and not hitting the fenders if you hit a bump with the wheels turned. My new upper a-arms are longer than stock even when adjusted as short as they'll go, so it takes away from tire size a little. I went with a 1-3/8" arning drop, so I'll have some good camber gain that will help pull the tire in as it travels but even with that, the 225's were necessary.

I went and purchased some used tires, 245/45/17, 225/50/17, and 275/40/17. Here's a pic with the 225 and 275 installed.
20200517_143726 by 7T02S, on Flickr

I went with the 275 on the rear for now, on a 9.5 w 6" backspacing. I will have tons of room and may go with a 285 later on if I'm not rubbing when the axle is articulating.
20200517_152602 by 7T02S, on Flickr

And here are my wheels and tires! I'm choosing to keep the wheels a secret for a while ;-)
2020-06-20_07-13-29 by 7T02S, on Flickr

Also, here's a test fit of the front calipers! Looking good!
20200606_122446 by 7T02S, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter #191
It's been a long while waiting for this moment. There have been some hiccups along the way getting parts after having to cancel a big order for engine parts because one vendor didn't work out, which ended up taking 3 months extra because I had to re-order parts from another vendor and start the "custom parts order clock" over again. Hat's off to Brent Lykins (Lykin's Motorsports) for getting me quite a few of the heavy hitting FE internals in a timely fashion (445 stoker rotating assembly with forged rods and custom forged pistons, custom roller cam, roller non-adjustable rocker arms, and a host of other parts). He was great to work with and very knowledgeable. I highly recommend him.

Here it is when I was picking it up from Paolo Engine Service in Oregon City, OR. Roy and Bud did a great job! No doubt it will run strong. I lucked out because I rushed to get all the parts before the lock-downs hit. While my engine was sitting at the shop with nearly all the parts required for the build and other builds in the shop's queue were running in to part availability issues, it brought mine to the front of the line. It also helped my case because the lock-downs slowed down the racing team demands. The 3 months I lost due to my original custom parts order took me right out of the "off season" window I had planned to hit at the engine shop. Isn't she pretty?!
20200619_145902 by 7T02S, on Flickr

If I could give one piece of advice on engine builds - start early to allow yourself time to re-adjust when unforeseen things happen. I started ordering parts in October 2019 and have the engine back in June 2020. Fortunately, it's just in time for when I need it. I'm going planning to install it in the car in July to start doing my test fits. Start early and do lots of planning!

Here it is, home at last! The engine cradle I made made transporting it a breeze. I also used the four chains from a engine lift leveler to attach to the engine to give me points to strap to. I ran the rear straps down to the bumper brackets and the front ones to mounts I put in the floor of the bed. I wasn't trusting the stock tie down points.
20200619_172222 by 7T02S, on Flickr

Here it is in my shop. I still need to refurbish the valve covers and air cleaner. I test fit one of tri-Y headers from FPA on this side. Sure looks great! The nice thing about the engine cradle is I can test fit the Quick Time bellhousing and even install the transmission before installing in the car.
20200620_152021 by 7T02S, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter #193
I've been playing with glue. Blue glue. I'm in the process of getting the upper cowl in place and am taking a different route than normal. I don't see welding the cowl on as a good option because of this is an area where all the water goes. It's a gutter system. Once the upper cowl is on, there's not a great way to get in there an seal it up from the inside to keep water from being sucked into all the flanges, via capillary action. So I'm using glue. Epoxy glue. It doubles as seam sealer and is impervious to moisture. This is also the perfect joint for adhesive. Except for the drains, it's completely surrounded by inch wide flanges, giving lots of surface area for glue. Surface area is what glue likes. It also works really well in shear, which is what the cowl sees when stressed.

After some research, decided to go with Fusor 2098 Crash Durable Structural Adhesive. It's got the same tensile strength as many panel bond adhesives, except it's toughness is a lot higher. It also has glass beads in it so you can't over clamp it. Also has a 90 minute work time and a 6 hour clamp time. Not bad.

I started with the inner cowl hats. I decided to cut the spot welds so that I could make sure it wasn't bare metal in the flanges. It was, even on this brand new, e-coated part. I guess I could have used seam sealer and poured something on the inside to flood the seam. Probably would have been easier. But I decided to cut the flange off and use this as my first glue experiment. I also already had the adhesive and it uses a single tube, so you don't have to buy a super expensive caulking gun, although I learned you do need an extremely good single tube caulking gun, which I already had from house work. I'm talking about the $45 dollar variety with cast aluminum, long handles. I tried normal caulking guns and they just plain didn't apply enough force to force the two part epoxy through the mixing tip. Fortunately, I already had the expensive gun.
20200530_150002 by 7T02S, on Flickr

20200614_134905 by 7T02S, on Flickr

20200620_123238 by 7T02S, on Flickr

Pretty happy with how these turned out. It's a super strong joint and completely water proof. It's also ready to epoxy prime over. Another factor in my decision. Note I already stripped the paint off while the hat was off, to make it easy to epoxy prime afterward, because I'll be sanding all the e-coat off.
20200620_213107 by 7T02S, on Flickr

Next up was positioning and gluing on the apron extensions to the upper cowl. I decided to either weld these on, or glue them on, before gluing on the upper cowl. If I welded, I would want to paint the burned off primer on the inside, and if I glued, then I would want access for clamps. I decided to use glue. This is also another really good joint for glue because it has lots of surface area and the joints are mostly in shear.

Once I positioned the assembly, I used clecos to hold them in place when I removed the cowl from the car for gluing. They offer easy positioning when gluing.
20200621_145042 by 7T02S, on Flickr

20200621_160616 by 7T02S, on Flickr

All dry. Perfectly positioned and strong as nails.
20200621_223728 by 7T02S, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter #194
Yesterday was a long one prepping and epoxy priming my upper and lower cowls. I started by sanding off all the e-coat. Once I was done with all the dust making activities, I cleaned shop a bit and de-dusted the area as much as I could. I then constructed a make-shift paint booth around the cowl after much brainstorming of the various ways I could construct and mount it. I had already purchased the two 10'x25' rolls of 6mil plastic for the purpose. This is in a lower area of my garage (dirty area), so it was critical to set this up properly to keep overspray vented outside and off of my cars in the upper garage (add on garage) that are separated by normal roll-up doors, only on the inside in between the upper and lower garages. Since I was keeping them closed, I needed to vent completely with the side window, using the other side window for inlet. Here's what I came up with that somehow took about 4 hours to construct. I used the garage door tracks to hang the plastic from and then bridged up to the ceiling with paper. I used to 20" box fans in the window and two inlet filters in the hanging cardboard. When I turned the fans on, the area effectively became negative pressure, which kept overspray from the surrounding garage. I was less concerned about dust, than overspray, hence not worrying too much about perfect filtration, especially since I had lots of gaps and used a flap for a door.
20200628_092006 by 7T02S, on Flickr

Inside the "cowl booth" with the two cowls pieces in bare metal. I later taped off the metal flanges and used waterbourne wax and grease remover twice until the rags came up clean. I followed some advice I found online of putting the WGR in a spray bottle and spraying down the surfaces. Use one rag on a small area to remove the contaminents followed closely by a clean rag to dry the surface. I did this twice until the final wiping rag came up clean.
20200627_154900 by 7T02S, on Flickr

I then sprayed two coats of SPI Epoxy Primer with mid-grade HF HVLP spray gun. It was my first time using an HVLP gun in 25 years. I followed the gun's directions on setup and tested spray patterns on a hanging piece of construction paper then I just went for it. While not perfect, I was actually impressed how they pieces came out! This was a good first time spraying on the car expirement, since it gives me confidence I can prime the rest of the car myself, albeit with a better paint booth setup. The tricky areas were in the tight troughs around the cowl hats.
20200627_212148 by 7T02S, on Flickr
 

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What was the method you used to remove the e-coat and clean the cowl panels to bare metal? From what I see in the pictures, you got it all and I can imagine that was a lot of work and not easy.
 

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Discussion Starter #196
What was the method you used to remove the e-coat and clean the cowl panels to bare metal? From what I see in the pictures, you got it all and I can imagine that was a lot of work and not easy.
I used a combination of 2" sanding 120 grit discs on an air 90 degree tool, electric DA with 80 grit, then red scotchbrite to scuff the 120 areas to make the epoxy stick. I had previously sanded the area around the hats and the hats themselves with the 120 discs. Then removing the rest yesterday took about 2 hours and a majority was done with the DA. I use an electric HF DA with variable speed, works quite well. The areas for glue, I leave in 120 grit.

Sent from my SM-G973U using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #197
Well, after all the talk about gluing the cowl on, I decided to go a different route. When I did the above adhering with the Crash Durable Structural Adhesive, I created a sample joint using the same preparation methods. It seemed pretty stout until I decided to try a peel test. Adhesive is known to not be as good in peel as shear (sliding), and I knew that, but I still couldn't resist trying to do a peel. I probably couldn't have done this with thicker steel but my test pieces were about 20 gauge sheet and easy to bend so it was easy to bend the steel back right at the start of the joint - still to my surprise, it was far to easy to peel these apart in my mind. This should have been harder to peel at room temperature, especially being the tougher crash durable variety. I followed directions but I sort of feel I didn't abrade the surface well enough, I would have preferred to use 80 grit DA on the surface but the instructions said to use "100 grit or finer disk."

20200629_182628 by 7T02S, on Flickr

I actually tried my hardest to pop the apron extensions off the cowl by prying at several points with a screwdriver. None of it budge or even cracked the edge of the glue like my sample above did. So it probably would have been just fine but I just couldn't let it be. I used a heat gun and then they were able to pop off at over 200 degrees. The larger area was actually extremely difficult to pull up and had to chisel it off when it was hot. So it was actually probably way better than my peel test above indicated.

20200705_113446 by 7T02S, on Flickr

Here I scraped them off a bit but still need to sand them back down and straighten them back up a bit.

20200712_060055 by 7T02S, on Flickr

20200712_060027 by 7T02S, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter #198
So my new plan is to take my car down to a shop that has a high end STRSW - squeeze type resistance spot welder. I'm still going to use with glue or sealer that can be spot welded through. The high end spot welders have digital controls and actually have specific settings for "weld bonding," which is welding through structural adhesive and should also have settings for welding through sealer. I think I'd still like to use the structural adhesive to create a better joint than spot welding alone and get a really good epoxy seal at the same time, but will base the decision on the shops experience I think.

I've already found two shops that said they would do the job for me. This is harder to find than it sounds. I called quite a few shops and they said they don't do "partial" repairs and corporate policy prevents them from entertaining the idea and sent me on my way!

So how to I get it to a shop? I need to take it off the chassis jig and get it on it's wheels, so that's what I'm doing this weekend. It's going to be on rubber today!
 

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Discussion Starter #199
Getting the car on the ground also fits in with my plan of assembling the engine, drivetrain, steering, and suspension before primer so that I can modify anything if needed. Also need to check hood clearance to my air cleaner. I'm also going to be installing the subframe connectors when I get my new ones and making an X-brace with driveshaft loop(s), installing a panhard bar kit, and might figure out the exhaust too. That way I don't have to mess up brand new epoxy primer. My only rub is making sure I transport the car down to a shop on a sunny, low humidity day; which nicely fits into the 10 day forecast. I also need to arrange it so that the spot welding job is completed in a single afternoon, so I can get it back home before humidity climbs back up. Don't want all my work to rust!
 

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Thanks for performing the science experiment, we all benefit.

So question, if you can spot weld through the adhesive/seam sealer, then why can't you apply seam sealer around the rosette weld holes and then rosette weld? Any seam sealer that would squeeze into the weld area could be cleaned up before welding. I ask as this would be a preferred approach if it can be done. No need to transport the shell to a shop and I have gotten pretty good at plug welding.

Thanks
 
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