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Discussion Starter #121
Once the trunk divider was in place, all of that inner structure in the rear of the car stiffened up substantially. Now was time to start fitting the quarter panels, tail lamp panel, quarter extensions, rear window panel, decklid, bumper, and lower valance. I need to make sure all of these parts align so I can dial in the position of the quarter panels prior to welding.

Back using the lasers to make sure the panels go back to where they were before I welded in the trunk divider. I used a sharpie before taking all of this apart last time so that I could reference them easily.
20200203_191522 by 7T02S, on Flickr

20200208_113247 by 7T02S, on Flickr

I've been having several issues all along with this rear area. The tail panel doesn't really fit the quarter panels. The quarter extensions don't fit the curve of the tail lamp panel, the decklid sticks out too far, the quarters naturally want to sit a little low so they have to be pushed upward and clamped into position, the decklid gaps are a little off, and the lower valence has a curve that isn't matched on the Dynacorn quarters. Also, total width of the quarters is narrow causing the quarter panel extensions to not align with the bumper's width. Lot's of issues to resolve.

Here's the valence curve mismatch. The quarters don't have the right curve.
20200208_113300 by 7T02S, on Flickr

The black lines on the quarter adapter panel are where I need to cut it to match the tail lamp panel.
20200208_102618 by 7T02S, on Flickr

Another issue I had was the repro tail light panel was taller than the OEM. Basically, the height between the upper flat area and the lower flat area were spread out by about 1/4". I was lucky to find an NOS tail lamp panel in the local adds for a reasonable price and snagged it up. It fits much better.

Sorry, don't have pictures handy of some of the above observations. Once I get the quarter panels welded in place, I be able to address these issues one by one and take some pictures.

One thing I've learned on this project is the importance of moving on. It's great to plan and measure 1000 times but at some point you've got to start welding in some panels. It's amazing how slowly welding in the underlying parts causes the next issues to have fewer solutions, which is sometimes a good thing as long as you don't have to go backwards and cut out the parts previously welded in. That's why good planning and measuring is important, so that you don't have to go backwards. When you have fewer solutions to solve the problem at hand, issues that seem to have been insurmountable in the past all of a sudden have a solution. When the entire car is just clamped together, any issue you find can be explained by seemingly an infinite number of different ways the underlying parts can be clamped together, not to mention having some flex in the assembly. As they are methodically welded in place, the structure starts to become more rigid and when you push and pull on the next parts to address issues, things get easier solve and to lock down. That's why the big list of issues I listed above I'm not overly worried about. Once I get the quarter panels welded in about 75% (leaving some room to flex in the back), I know that I'll be able to start solving the puzzle.
 

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Discussion Starter #122
Made some good progress over the few days. The was a LOT of prep in getting the quarters ready to go onto the car for the last time.

Last weekend, I marked and drilled/punched the plug welding holes in the quarters.
20200215_155054 by 7T02S, on Flickr

Next up was prepping all the surfaces for the weld thru primer. Since there were large areas that would be extremely hard to get primer/paint on later, I decided to do both weld-thru primer priming and epoxy painting. Since the Cobre weld thru primer sets up nicely overnight and can be taped/masked the next day without pulling it up, I decided to do the primer first.
20200215_173234 by 7T02S, on Flickr

Masking done after a couple hours. Then it was time for priming.
20200215_173208 by 7T02S, on Flickr

Masking removed.
20200215_205835 by 7T02S, on Flickr

I let the weld thru primer dry over night then masked over it in the morning.
20200216_121847 by 7T02S, on Flickr

I chose to use VHT Epoxy Primer (satin black) in spraycan form to coat the Dynacorn primer and areas I sanded to bare metal. I'm not set up to spray SPI Epoxy yet, so the spray cans will have to do. The VHT went down extremely nice with three light coats. Zero runs.
20200216_125408 by 7T02S, on Flickr

Here is the final result on the car, with both weld thru primer patches and the VHT Epoxy. I'm really happy with how this turned out.
20200216_143347 by 7T02S, on Flickr

2020-02-17_07-04-24 by 7T02S, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter #123
After I finished the VHT paint, I had four braces to fabricate.

The first two were to finish up the slot I made in the C-pillar to allow the wheel well mohawks to push outward.
20200216_152744 by 7T02S, on Flickr

First was to use this tool to figure out the angle for the patch.
20200216_152756 by 7T02S, on Flickr

Here are the patches made from a flat sheet of sheet metal. I cut them out with a cutoff wheel and bent them over in a bench vise.
20200216_160413 by 7T02S, on Flickr

Prepped with primer and I let them sit over night. The primer scrapes off pretty easy if not left over night.
20200217_093113 by 7T02S, on Flickr

Clamped into place.
20200217_093159 by 7T02S, on Flickr

After four plug welds and a seam weld at the top.
20200217_093959 by 7T02S, on Flickr

Other side
20200217_094700 by 7T02S, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter #124
The other two braces were to stengthen up the area where the rear of quarter panels meets the trunk floor drop off at thin metal the flexes. These braces will weld into the rear floor cross member. I used a pneumatic flange tool to create an offset.
20200217_095441 by 7T02S, on Flickr

Left side welded in place on the inside.
20200217_100035 by 7T02S, on Flickr

Welded on the outside in two places then welds ground flush.
20200217_100951 by 7T02S, on Flickr

Inside on the left.
20200217_101001 by 7T02S, on Flickr

Right side.
20200217_101608 by 7T02S, on Flickr

These really strengthened up that area. I can't believe Ford left the quarter panels welding to the thin metal there. I just flexes a lot. I like this much better.
 

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Discussion Starter #125
Next up was actually placing the quarter panels on the car for the last time!!! It's hard to describe how big of an accomplishment this feels like.

First step was to place some heavy craft paper onto the car to protect the weld thru primer as the quarters are slid into place. Weld thru primer isn't as tough as other primer and paint and it scrapes off pretty easy due to poor adhesion. It's best to protect surfaces that slide against each other when the mating panels are put into place.
20200217_114807 by 7T02S, on Flickr

I found the wheel well was a little to tight for craft paper or tape to protect the surfaces. I was able to pull the quarter around this lower area on the quarter and cleco it in place without sliding the surfaces.
20200217_121339 by 7T02S, on Flickr

Here's the left quarter panel cleco'd in place.
20200217_115848 by 7T02S, on Flickr

Here is the series of clecos used to positively locate the right quarter.
20200217_193022 by 7T02S, on Flickr

20200217_193005 by 7T02S, on Flickr

20200217_193051 by 7T02S, on Flickr

The clecos allow everything to go back together with the quarter perfectly matching the door contour and barely having to shift the panels along the fragile weld thru primer without scraping it off. The craft paper also helped.
20200217_122609 by 7T02S, on Flickr

I'm not going to actually weld the quarter until I get the tail light are sorted out a little. The clecos do allow for a little bit of movement, so I can raise and lower the back of the quarter a little that wouldn't be possible if I weld it. I just ordered some new quarter panel to tail light panel pieces to replace the sub par ones that come welded on the Dynacorn quarters. I'm going to cut them out and start fresh. I ordered some goodmark pieces from rockauto and they'll be here before next weekend.
 

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Discussion Starter #126
Well that brings me back up to date with my story line and photos. It took me 4 days (since post #108) to catch up on the last 3.5 weeks of work and photos, while also continuing to work on it this weekend, posting those as well. It got to a point where there were so many photos, I didn't know if I should skip a bunch but I decided to plug through them and get enough of them posted to show the work I had done. I can't tell you how great it feels to have the quarter panels in place never to be removed again. Next will be the tail light area, welding the quarters, drip rails, and roof. After doing more and more work, I'm starting to get a better understanding of how long each step will take. I think the tail light area can be mostly done next weekend, the drip rails and roof the week or two after that.
 

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Discussion Starter #127
Well that brings me back up to date with my story line and photos.
I really appreciate the pictures and details of your work. I thought about the HF spot welder for welding in my lower and upper cowl panels. After your failure, I will just take the time to drill the necessary holes and plug weld.
Hey @Boss5Oh , I figured I would let you know I found the problem with my HF spot welder and it works fine now. Turns out one of the threaded tips was a little loose and created a bunch of oxidation, enough to keep current from flowing! I cleaned up the mating surfaces on both tips and tightened them on down and it worked again! I figured that out after taking the whole thing apart, finding nothing wrong, testing the switch, checking the wires in the 240V plug, and so on. I decided after that the only thing that could be wrong was no continuity with the work piece, thus looking at the tips.

Even though it still works, I'm not sure what I think about it. In some places it has been really nice but it's really heavy and very difficult to get consistent results. Not only do you have to hold it in awkward positions (it weighs 30 lbs!), you also have to hold a significant amount of pressure on the handle during and after each weld. It's not for the faint of heart! That also makes it difficult to do lots of welds in succession. It's a workout, well at least for me - I walk away spent and covered in sweat! Coming full circle, MIG is WAY easier and consistent, especially if you buy a nice one that also uses gas.

For what it's worth, I think I've decided to plug weld my lower cowl in place and then glue the upper panel down with Fusor 2098, which is crash durable structural adhesive and doubles as seam sealer. I can't think of a better application for it on our mustangs. It's spendy at $70 for a tube but I think will do the whole job. I've been spending $35 for each can of weld thru primer, so that helps put in perspective. I can't think of a better way to seal the upper cowl and keep water out of the seams from the inside where all the water is. The strength of the resulting joint should be every bit as strong and tough as the factory spot welds. Anyways, thought I'd let you know the direction I was going to go on that in case it helps you out too.
 

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Discussion Starter #129
what hole punch are you using?
It's a HF pneumatic tool with a hole punch on one side of the head and a step flange tool on the other side. Works decently but I had to increase the throat on the hole punch with a cut off wheel to get the hole to the right distance away from the edge of the sheet metal part. It's a small diameter, so it works best on 20 and 22 gauge metal. If it was on 18 or thicker, I'd increase the hole size.
 

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It's a HF pneumatic tool with a hole punch on one side of the head and a step flange tool on the other side. Works decently but I had to increase the throat on the hole punch with a cut off wheel to get the hole to the right distance away from the edge of the sheet metal part. It's a small diameter, so it works best on 20 and 22 gauge metal. If it was on 18 or thicker, I'd increase the hole size.
cool thanks I just picked one of them up looks a little small I’ll have to try the cut off wheel!
 

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Discussion Starter #131
Alright, it's time for a few engine updates. I've been acquiring parts for my engine since October. It's going to be a stroker 445 c.i. with approx 500hp and just north of that on torque. My custom pistons just shipped, which are the last major part I needed for the build. In less than I week I'll be taking the block back to the engine builder (Roy Paolo in Oregon City, OR) along with all the parts. I'll give an update on all the internals soon but wanted to do a quick update on the front accessories since I fit them up tonight.

Firstly, pardon that darn C#&^! in the background. Just trying to keep it honest with an FE in the room!

Here's the new stainless, low-mount alternator bracket from a seller on ebay. I went this route so that I could fit a large frame 3G 130A Motorcraft alternator (shown is the old 1G for fitment). I like the simplicity of the bracket. The waterpump is from Tuff Stuff. The damper is a PowerBond PB1111SS SFI balancer. The pulleys are from CVF racing. They are 8 groove and should keep the high output 3G alternator from slipping. The pulleys are usually part of a conversion pully set that CVF makes but it comes with a high mount alternator bracket that is only compatible with a small frame 3G that is limited to 95A. I decided to do a low mount bracket and asked CVF if I could just buy the pulleys, and they said yes but didn't gaurantee the fitment since I wasn't using their bracket. The alternator spacer to the block needs to be 1.5" to align with the other two pulleys. My stock spacer is 1.625", so I'll likely have to space the crank and waterpump pump pulley's out that much. Not a problem there, I just have to buy some purpose made 0.125" spacers. I'm getting rid of the power steering pump and not going to install the air conditioning for a while, so this will be the setup for some time. I'm also going with an electric fan, so no fan and mechanical fan shroud to cover up the front of the engine.
20200218_185939 by 7T02S, on Flickr

Since I'm taking the block down to the engine builder within a week, I wanted to test fit the parts to the block and get the pulleys measured up for a belt so that I have it ready for the engine dyno in a few months. I used a fabric tape measure and got numbers at the ends of the travel. The measurements were 38-5/8" to 40-5/8", so I'll get one just small enough to slip on, so I'm guessing around a 39" belt but my meaurement is to the top of the grooves, so I'll to make an adjustment based on where the actual belt length is measured. CVF said they would help me with that. They sell Gates 8 rib belts for the job.
20200218_191551 by 7T02S, on Flickr

I think I'll be happy with this setup as long as I can tighten the alternator down enough to keep it from squeeling. All for the quest for more amps... I think I can use that third hole on the alternator and a bracket down to the back of the adjustment bolt to mount a turn buckle if needed but I think it will be just fine like this using the standard prybar method before tightening the bolt.

Then for nothing else than taking a photo, I placed my Edlebrock Pro-Flo 4 EFI system on the block. I think this will look killer with my Edelbrock heads and some headers! That block will look great in a corporate dark blue suit too!
20200218_190845 by 7T02S, on Flickr

Cheers
 
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