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Discussion Starter #1
Good day folks further to my previous thread(project car) these are the 3 main suggestions.Please give your opinion and the pros and cons.
1-Original body?Purchasing a genuine car and build it from the ground up.
2-Dynacorn? Purchasing one of their bodies and building it.
3- Buy a car already near completion?
My original budget was around 60-70g
Thanks again for all your insight.
 

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Having a shop build you one will be Crazy expensive, 100 ish?
 

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if you're looking for a completed car then #3 is the only option that makes sense. Most shops will try to convince you that #1 or #2 is the only way to go but that is in their best interest.

david
 

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Another vote for #3. Unless you are going to be doing a lot of the work yourself, I don’t think 1 or 2 can be accomplished for the same amount of money.
 

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1966 Fastback, 289 - C4
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Another vote for #3. It's what I did with a similar budget in mind.
I did alot of thinking, got pretty lucky to find the car I did... Doing alot of the work myself to make it "mine".

Good luck with any route you take!
 

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#1 works if you can find a rust free one. If.

#2 works pretty much always. Keep in mind that all the joints are going to be bare steel. It's new steel but it's worth mentioning.

#3 works if you can find one and it's also not been "hacked." Unless a car is in bare metal, you never know what sins could be hiding. Almost done doesn't mean anything unless it comes with a very detailed picture book showing exactly what was done. If you go this route, make sure you knock on all the exterior panels to make sure they don't "thud" when you hit them, indicating lots of thick bondo work. It's easy to cover things up, it's hard to do it right - which is why most people don't do it right. Hard = expensive.

In my experience on my 67 Fastback, I thought I had a pretty decent one (#1 option) but then I had it dipped and realized rust got the best of it. Ford didn't coat the backsides of many of the panels (roof, dash, cowl, front frame rails, torque boxes, quarter panels, quarter structure, roof structure, door pillar structure, etc) and used seam sealer that eventually, years later, holds moisture to the surface of the metal resulting in pits. I've more or less saved the lower galvanized portions and replaced nearly everything else, nearly making a new shell. At times I wished I had just purchased the #2 option. It would have saved me 3-4 years. Coming up in the next month of two, I'll finally have a shell that's the equivalent of #2, in terms of readiness for the next step - and saved me a lot of grief. Not saying I'm not happy with the result, it's just worth mentioning.

I think if I ever build another car like this (restomod), I'll probably buy pre-built body. Far less to worry about other than fitment issues. The #2 option reduces the concern of what's hiding under the surface and gives you a pretty good understanding of what you purchased. The #1 and #3 options have the obvious risks involved of not knowing what's under the surface (and weld seams).

Check out @j persons build thread of a dynacorn body LINK
Also, this link shows good dynacorn build info LINK
 

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Discussion Starter #10
#1 works if you can find a rust free one. If.

#2 works pretty much always. Keep in mind that all the joints are going to be bare steel. It's new steel but it's worth mentioning.

#3 works if you can find one and it's also not been "hacked." Unless a car is in bare metal, you never know what sins could be hiding. Almost done doesn't mean anything unless it comes with a very detailed picture book showing exactly what was done. If you go this route, make sure you knock on all the exterior panels to make sure they don't "thud" when you hit them, indicating lots of thick bondo work. It's easy to cover things up, it's hard to do it right - which is why most people don't do it right. Hard = expensive.

In my experience on my 67 Fastback, I thought I had a pretty decent one (#1 option) but then I had it dipped and realized rust got the best of it. Ford didn't coat the backsides of many of the panels (roof, dash, cowl, front frame rails, torque boxes, quarter panels, quarter structure, roof structure, door pillar structure, etc) and used seam sealer that eventually, years later, holds moisture to the surface of the metal resulting in pits. I've more or less saved the lower galvanized portions and replaced nearly everything else, nearly making a new shell. At times I wished I had just purchased the #2 option. It would have saved me 3-4 years. Coming up in the next month of two, I'll finally have a shell that's the equivalent of #2, in terms of readiness for the next step - and saved me a lot of grief. Not saying I'm not happy with the result, it's just worth mentioning.

I think if I ever build another car like this (restomod), I'll probably buy pre-built body. Far less to worry about other than fitment issues. The #2 option reduces the concern of what's hiding under the surface and gives you a pretty good understanding of what you purchased. The #1 and #3 options have the obvious risks involved of not knowing what's under the surface (and weld seams).

Check out @j persons build thread of a dynacorn body LINK
Also, this link shows good dynacorn build info LINK
Thanks a lot for the in depth response I appreciate it.
 

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I think if I ever build another car like this (restomod), I'll probably buy pre-built body. Far less to worry about other than fitment issues. The #2 option reduces the concern of what's hiding under the surface and gives you a pretty good understanding of what you purchased. The #1 and #3 options have the obvious risks involved of not knowing what's under the surface (and weld seams).
I agree with these points. You might save yourself a lot of toil and trouble by buying project already completed or close to completion. If you are familiar with it or know someone that can vouch for it, that is the way to go. HOWEVER, you may be buying someone else's mess. I have read so, so many stories about people buy supposedly restored cars only to find out they bought a rusted out crack whore with a ton of makeup hiding years of neglect. You watch some of the restoration shows on TV and probably 80% or better of cars they purchase or have brought to them for restoration have tons of hidden issues.
 

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#1 is not a bad idea if you can find an original car with minimal to no rust (very challenging.) The problem with this is too many sellers state rust free and unless you are versed in how to check all the usual places there will be hidden rust. Buy a rusty project car and be prepared for years of struggles, everything from finding a shop to do the work to one that says they will do the work but puts you on the back burner with a requirement of you giving them an open checkbook.

# 2 is like building a new car because you will need to source all new parts for the shell. Even if you buy a used donor you will probably not want to use many of the parts due to their cosmetic condition and wear and tear. This is another open checkbook scenario.

#3. For the money you are willing to spend you can easily find a properly redone, running and ready to enjoy car. You just need to do a thorough inspection. Bring a friend who's familiar with these cars. Invest in a paint thickness gauge to check the body to see if there is any hidden areas with too much bondo.

If it were me, having been down this road a few times before, I'd go #3. If you go #1 or #2 be prepared for a long journey, with an uncertain $ 's and timeframe endpoint. Many people lose interest in this long journey. If you opt for #3, you get a nice, running car that you can enjoy while making it your own. It's much harder to get discouraged and lose interest with this choice.
 
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If you go #3, take a scope camera to look into every crevice (you can buy ones that plug into your cell phone) as well as a paint thickness gauge (I have a spring loaded magnetic one). I had a fellow inspect my car (I purchased at an auction on-line, talk about pucker power) and he sent me 180 pictures including into the doors, under the dash, and everywhere else you can think. I got lucky, it appears to be all original sheet metal. If you can find one with a scrapbook full of pictures of the restoration that's a real plus.
 

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What does restomod mean to you? Figure out what you want the car to be and then look for #3 unless you have interest in a multi year project and plan to do most of the work yourself. You should be able to find a lot of really nice cars all done and sorted for that kind of money.
 

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I chose option #1 for my 68 fastback. I don't have the skill or proper equipment to do sheet metal work. I currently have it at a shop that specializes in 65-70 mustangs. The car has the usual rust in the quarter panels and doors but overall is pretty clean. When I dropped it off at their shop last September, they inspected it and noticed a lot of things I didn't see or know to look for. Bent frame rails from a previous accident, bent torque box, rust in the cowling etc. Their recomendation was to replace all body panels with aftermarket sheet metal. The logic was there is always hidden areas of rust that will show up down the road. With new sheet metal that problem is eliminated. The cost to repair and patch would be almost as much as replacement. They even found a parts car to salvage the frame rails from. Their promise to me is they will give me the car back completely assembled with all gaps set, primered and ready for block sanding and paint. Cost will be around $20K. They will finally get into their shop in the next couple of weeks so I should be able to give an honest assessment of their quality soon. You can see pictures of my car as I found it in the Build forums.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I chose option #1 for my 68 fastback. I don't have the skill or proper equipment to do sheet metal work. I currently have it at a shop that specializes in 65-70 mustangs. The car has the usual rust in the quarter panels and doors but overall is pretty clean. When I dropped it off at their shop last September, they inspected it and noticed a lot of things I didn't see or know to look for. Bent frame rails from a previous accident, bent torque box, rust in the cowling etc. Their recomendation was to replace all body panels with aftermarket sheet metal. The logic was there is always hidden areas of rust that will show up down the road. With new sheet metal that problem is eliminated. The cost to repair and patch would be almost as much as replacement. They even found a parts car to salvage the frame rails from. Their promise to me is they will give me the car back completely assembled with all gaps set, primered and ready for block sanding and paint. Cost will be around $20K. They will finally get into their shop in the next couple of weeks so I should be able to give an honest assessment of their quality soon. You can see pictures of my car as I found it in the Build forums.
Thanks I will keep a eye on your build are you doing rest of the work yourself?
 

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Yes... My plan is to build a Bullitt tribute car. I am in the process of building a 390 fe to replace the 289. I have the 4 speed toploader transmission. Should have a correct bell housing and 9" rear end in the next couple of weeks. Once I get the body from the fabricator I will do the final body work and paint. I have a friend who does paint work and another that has a professional paint booth. After that, I'll be doing everything myself.
Just something to consider... if you choose option #2, you will have a car that "looks" like a Mustang but it won't be a Mustang. Only cars built by Ford are genuine Mustangs. If that's not important to you then it's a viable option.
 

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#1 if you can find a deal on a clean complete driver car, you will have all the original parts. you will have money leftover to modify any way you want ( bonus if you can do work yourself)
# 2 will be expensive because you will have to source out hundred of parts that add up quickly. lots of man labor involved.
#3 could be the best option IF you find a good car. there is always a good chance you are buying a mess that looks nice from the outside. if you go this route have it inspected well. if you end up buying a pricey hack job, you will spend double making it right.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
#1 if you can find a deal on a clean complete driver car, you will have all the original parts. you will have money leftover to modify any way you want ( bonus if you can do work yourself)
# 2 will be expensive because you will have to source out hundred of parts that add up quickly. lots of man labor involved.
#3 could be the best option IF you find a good car. there is always a good chance you are buying a mess that looks nice from the outside. if you go this route have it inspected well. if you end up buying a pricey hack job, you will spend double making it right.
Thanks for the input.
 
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