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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
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As long as we're on the subject, would a windage tray really make that much difference? If so, how much? Any disadvantages of using one?

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[color:green] '67 cpe, daily driver </font color=green>
 

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as long as were on the subject. . .how do they work? i always see them advertised but have no idea what advantages they have

'66 coupe resto in progress... IT NEVER ENDS
 

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That was my reasoning for asking. I am pretty sure my motor is date coded as a late '66 (ok, so it's not the orig, '68 motor! you all got me :) ). I assumed it was a 390GT block. The person working on my car went to change the oil pan and said it has a windage tray so I need another gasket.

Mike

Mike
Cortlandt Manor, NY
'68 GT390 FB, 4spd bench seat
http://www.geocities.com/stangman39/stangsho.html
 
G

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A windage tray fits around the crankshaft throws to prevent crankshaft wind currents from aerating the oil.
It is also wise to use the deep sump pan to get the oil further away from the crank throws to help resist oil frothing
Without the tray the the crank wind current picks up the oil and churns it into a froth. The froth now fills the lower end of the motor causing the crank to now have to pass through it robbing horse power. The oil becomes aerated during all this churning. the aerated oil is now pumped through the motor causing a lack of lubrication to the bearings

Greg B
 
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