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Discussion Starter #1
I’m trying to eliminate the distribution block on my ’68 with factory disc brakes. I want to run the front circuit through a Tee to each front brake, and the rear through an adjustable prop.
The problem I’m having is that the three tubes that need to go into the Tee are 3/16” with extra large nuts (look like 7/16” or ½”) and any Tee that will accept those nuts is set up for a 5/16” line. The problem with that is the fact that the through hole in such a Tee is nearly as large around as the flare on the 3/16” line, and I wouldn’t trust it to seal on a brake line.
So, where can I procure a Tee for a 3/16” line and a ½-20 or 7/16-24 nut?
I realize I could cut the tubes and put the correct size nut on, but these are stainless lines, and I’ve heard they can be hard to flare, and I would prefer not to lose any length for fear of fitment issues.
I realize doing this will eliminate the brake warning lamp, but it will also eliminate the shuttle piston that actuates it, and any risk that the O-rings on that piston may fail leading to my two independent circuits becoming one.
Thanks,
Andrew
 

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You need to get on line pull up fittings and find the one your looking for ,I had to do the some thing on my brake lines for 65 mustang to fit a 78 granada hubs I'll try to find the web sight but they do make the fitting to work git back with you
 

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I cannot find any failure or group of failures that would fail and cause your "two independent circuits becoming one". It might leak, but there's simply no way the two circuits can "become one". If you're worried about the seals being old, put new ones in.


 

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Discussion Starter #5
Combination of failures

I cannot find any failure or group of failures that would fail and cause your "two independent circuits becoming one". It might leak, but there's simply no way the two circuits can "become one". If you're worried about the seals being old, put new ones in.

Thank you for posting that schematic - if the seal between the front chamber and the 'switch' chamber fails, and the seal between the 'switch' chamber and the rear chamber fails, the primary and secondary circuits are no longer independent. All three of those seals could be gone on my car now, and the only indication I would have is possibly a fluid leak at the switch and rear brakes that aren't proportioned.

I know I could replace the seals and have more peace of mind, but the only thing this distribution block is buying me is a lamp to come on when I have a hydraulic failure on one circuit, and to me it is not worth the (remote) risk that the seals on that shuttle piston could fail some time down the road. I've had a circuit fail on me before, and you certainly don't need a warning light to let you know you've got a big problem.:shocked:

Andrew
 

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Thank you for posting that schematic - if the seal between the front chamber and the 'switch' chamber fails, and the seal between the 'switch' chamber and the rear chamber fails, the primary and secondary circuits are no longer independent. All three of those seals could be gone on my car now, and the only indication I would have is possibly a fluid leak at the switch and rear brakes that aren't proportioned.

I know I could replace the seals and have more peace of mind, but the only thing this distribution block is buying me is a lamp to come on when I have a hydraulic failure on one circuit, and to me it is not worth the (remote) risk that the seals on that shuttle piston could fail some time down the road. I've had a circuit fail on me before, and you certainly don't need a warning light to let you know you've got a big problem.:shocked:

Andrew
There is one huge hole in your scenario: The switch isn't sealed. Not even close. Fluid trying to cross the switch port might come out the top of the switch like a geyser, but pressurize the other side? No way in hell.

There is one other function- If the front brakes fail, the shuttle bypasses the proportioning valve to allow full-pressure function of the rear brakes. Without this, the prop valve will still be trying to reduce pressure to the rear brakes. Great safety feature, and you're trying to eliminate it.
 

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I’m trying to eliminate the distribution block on my ’68 with factory disc brakes. I want to run the front circuit through a Tee to each front brake, and the rear through an adjustable prop.
The problem I’m having is that the three tubes that need to go into the Tee are 3/16” with extra large nuts (look like 7/16” or ½”) and any Tee that will accept those nuts is set up for a 5/16” line. The problem with that is the fact that the through hole in such a Tee is nearly as large around as the flare on the 3/16” line, and I wouldn’t trust it to seal on a brake line.
So, where can I procure a Tee for a 3/16” line and a ½-20 or 7/16-24 nut?
I realize I could cut the tubes and put the correct size nut on, but these are stainless lines, and I’ve heard they can be hard to flare, and I would prefer not to lose any length for fear of fitment issues.
I realize doing this will eliminate the brake warning lamp, but it will also eliminate the shuttle piston that actuates it, and any risk that the O-rings on that piston may fail leading to my two independent circuits becoming one.
Thanks,
Andrew
You are about to do yourself a huge disservice here.

Get a rebuild package from one of the vendors (Nolan/Glazier might have this) rebuild the Valve, bolt in, reinstall all the Tubing (Very Important it all fits back vs refitting).

You need the Proportioning variables of this combination block. Yes, the T method will work with a additional Proprotioning valve, but cost wise, time wise, it is much easier/smarter to restore the existing Disc Brake system.

Dan @ Chockostang
 
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