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55K - 65K seems a little low?
Agree completely. In fact I'd say if that thing went to Mecum or B-J it would bring six figures easy and I'd bet Perkins knows that too. For some that's the Holy Grail.
 

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55K - 65K seems a little low?
45K - 50K "wholesale", and 55K - 65K retail. Yeah, I think someone is throwing a low price at the owner and using "wholesale" and "retail" as excuses for the low ball figures.
 

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While I don't know Perkins personally, from what I know of him, I don't think he would low ball a potential seller. Consider Boss 302 Mustangs are rare among Mustangs, but compared to the really high priced cars that go up for auction, there's a lot of them. Also, while this particular Boss 302 is in good shape for a survivor, it's in need a lot of cleaning up and other work to be show-worthy as a Thoroughbred entry. Likely the engine the seized.
 

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Perkins is not far off:


Yes, one owner but that goes away once it is sold. 11k miles is nice, but Perkins has some with a lot fewer. As nice as the car is as a survivor, it needs $$$ to get it to concours. A concours '69 is worth $135k and those are much more rare than a '70.
 

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Perkins is not far off:


Yes, one owner but that goes away once it is sold. 11k miles is nice, but Perkins has some with a lot fewer. As nice as the car is as a survivor, it needs $$$ to get it to concours. A concours '69 is worth $135k and those are much more rare than a '70.
I was under the impression Ford sold many more '69 Boss 302 Mustangs than '70 Boss Mustangs. (??)
 

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I can’t help but think that after a good clean up, there’ll be a long line of guys hoping to pay 65K for this low mileage car.
 

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From the article:

"Who knows, this could be the last original owner Boss 302 in the world. Is there another original owner out there that still has his or her Boss 302?"

As a matter of fact that's easy to answer. I know of at least one member on boss302.com who is the original owner of his '69 B2.
 

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I was under the impression Ford sold many more '69 Boss 302 Mustangs than '70 Boss Mustangs. (??)
Nope

1,628 in 69
7,013 in 70
 

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I can’t help but think that after a good clean up, there’ll be a long line of guys hoping to pay 65K for this low mileage car.
I would agree if by "good cleanup" you mean a typical day at the detail shop. That's different than a historically correct detail that would include rust repair of everything that even has flash rust, paint and chalk marks that would get it to a show winning level. One would probably have to put $25k into it to get it close to that $100k level. Then there is the mechanical freshen-up of a car that has sat for so long. One would expect seals to be gone everywhere.
 
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I don't think I would do a single thing to it, except prevent any new flash rust. In fact, I would offer not to buy the car, but arrange a contract where I became a caretaker and ownership would pass upon the original owner's passing if he preferred.
Once it is sold, it's not a one-owner.
Once it's restored, it's not an unrestored survivor.
They're only new once.
 

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I would agree if by "good cleanup" you mean a typical day at the detail shop. That's different than a historically correct detail that would include rust repair of everything that even has flash rust, paint and chalk marks that would get it to a show winning level. One would probably have to put $25k into it to get it close to that $100k level. Then there is the mechanical freshen-up of a car that has sat for so long. One would expect seals to be gone everywhere.
This! And, as I said above, the engine is likely seized. Any work attempted by anyone other than a Boss 302 restoration expert would end up lowering the car's ultimate value. Such work is extremely expensive. Thus, the seemingly low current value.
 

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I'm not sure what makes anyone think the engine would be seized, IME unless the hood was off and the carb rained in, it is very unlikely that it is seized. I have seen engines older than this stored inside and fire up with minimal work. And I wouldn't touch anything that didn't absolutely need to be fixed, not sure what the fixation is about tearing apart things that just don't need it on a car of this caliber. Clean it up, do some basic maintenance and leave the rest alone.
 

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I don't think I would do a single thing to it, except prevent any new flash rust. In fact, I would offer not to buy the car, but arrange a contract where I became a caretaker and ownership would pass upon the original owner's passing if he preferred.
Once it is sold, it's not a one-owner.
Once it's restored, it's not an unrestored survivor.
They're only new once.
I agree. I think spending $25K to restore this car might actually lower its value. I hate the phrase "It is what it is"....but in this case I think it applies. It isn't perfect, but "it is what it is"....and that is a survivor....

Phil
 

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What!!! make another trailer queen out of it? Patooey, get it so it runs and stops and drive the ever loving wheels off of it.
 
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