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My engine is out of a '71 Mustang, but I've been searching for a double roller timing chain kit for it. For whatever reason when I search on Summit, it excludes the double roller from the '71 engine year option. Is this a mistake? Surely I can use a double roller on this block, right?

Any preferred double rollers?

Tim
 

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The issue is a very minor one. There are two types of fuel pump eccentrics. A one piece cast and a later model which is a two piece stamped steel. The early one piece is thicker, requires a longer dowel and the cam gear is slightly thinner. The two piece eccentric is thinner, requires a shorter dowel and the cam sprocket is slightly thicker then the cam sprocket for the one piece eccentric. You have to keep all the parts matched.

I bought a billet Cloyes double roller set that will only work with the early one piece eccentric. I think Ford started using the two piece eccentric right around 71. So yes you can use it on your 71 302 as long as you use the correct eccentric and dowel for that timing chain set.
 

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Thanks, fellas! I appreciate the detailed response and the link to which double roller will work.

I assume the double roller is the way to go?

Tim
 

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Thanks, fellas! I appreciate the detailed response and the link to which double roller will work.

I assume the double roller is the way to go?

Tim
Significant overkill for most builds. The point behind double row chains is to reduce stretch caused by high camshaft loads (high lift, heavy valve springs, high pressure/volume oil pump, etc.). This "security" comes at the expense of increased friction and, thus, heat. Heck, even the HiPo had a single row chain.:yoho:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Significant overkill for most builds. The point behind double row chains is to reduce stretch caused by high camshaft loads (high lift, heavy valve springs, high pressure/volume oil pump, etc.). This "security" comes at the expense of increased friction and, thus, heat. Heck, even the HiPo had a single row chain.:yoho:
I thought the rollers helped reduce friction and heat?

Tim
 

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I thought the rollers helped reduce friction and heat?

Tim
99-44/100% of SBF timing chains are "roller chain". This is a chain with a cylindrical roller mounted on the link pin. This is where you get friction reduction over a plain "link chain".

Unfortunately, many folks...including manufacturers, have come to call "double row" roller chains "double roller", meaning chains with two rows and sprockets to match, with two parallel toothed wheels.

Double the chain, double the teeth, double the friction.:yoho:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
99-44/100% of SBF timing chains are "roller chain". This is a chain with a cylindrical roller mounted on the link pin. This is where you get friction reduction over a plain "link chain".

Unfortunately, many folks...including manufacturers, have come to call "double row" roller chains "double roller", meaning chains with two rows and sprockets to match, with two parallel toothed wheels.

Double the chain, double the teeth, double the friction.:yoho:
I agree that there will be friction, regardless, but if I compare this to the functionality of roller lifters and a cam, would these not produce more heat as well versus flat tappet?

I'm trying to draw the logic behind what the difference between the two would be.

Tim
 

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I agree that there will be friction, regardless, but if I compare this to the functionality of roller lifters and a cam, would these not produce more heat as well versus flat tappet?

I'm trying to draw the logic behind what the difference between the two would be.

Tim
Exactly the opposite. Since there is GREATLY reduced friction between the lifter and camshaft there is much less force required to spin the cam.... one of the reasons why 5.0 timing chains last just about forever.:yoho:
 
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